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607 records – page 1 of 61.

The 1990 Fraser Gurd Lecture: a Canadian trauma registry system--nine years experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226225
Source
J Trauma. 1991 Jun;31(6):856-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1991
Author
C M Burns
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Manitoba Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
J Trauma. 1991 Jun;31(6):856-66
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Manitoba - epidemiology
Registries
Wounds and injuries - classification - epidemiology
PubMed ID
2056552 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access and intensity of use of prescription analgesics among older Manitobans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150665
Source
Can J Clin Pharmacol. 2009;16(2):e322-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Cheryl A Sadowski
Anita G Carrie
Ruby E Grymonpre
Colleen J Metge
Phillip St John
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. csadowski@pharmacy.ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Clin Pharmacol. 2009;16(2):e322-30
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analgesics, Non-Narcotic - therapeutic use
Analgesics, Opioid - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Pain - drug therapy - epidemiology
Physician's Practice Patterns
Prescription Drugs
Residence Characteristics
Rural Population
Sex Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
Under-treatment of pain is frequently reported, especially among seniors, with chronic non-cancer pain most likely to be under-treated. Legislation regarding the prescribing/dispensing of opioid analgesics (including multiple prescription programs [MPP]) may impede access to needed analgesics.
To describe access and intensity of use of analgesics among older Manitobans by health region.
A cross-sectional study of non-Aboriginal non-institutionalized Manitoba residents over 65 years of age during April 1, 2002 to March 31, 2003 was conducted using the Pharmaceutical Claims data and the Cancer Registry from the province of Manitoba. Access to analgesics (users/1000/Yr) and intensity of use (using defined daily dose [DDD] methodology) were calculated for non-opioid analgesics, opioids, and multiple-prescription-program opioids [MPP-opioids]. Usage was categorized by age, gender, and stratified by cancer diagnosis. Age-sex standardized rates of prevalence and intensity are reported for the eleven health regions of Manitoba.
Thirty-four percent of older Manitobans accessed analgesics during the study period. Female gender, increasing age, and a cancer diagnosis were associated with greater access and intensity of use of all classes of analgesics. Age-sex standardized access and intensity measures revealed the highest overall analgesic use in the most rural / remote regions of the province. However, these same regions had the lowest use of opioids, and MPP-opioids among residents lacking a cancer diagnosis.
This population-based study of analgesic use suggests that there may be variations in use of opioids and other analgesics depending on an urban or rural residence. The impact of programs such as the MPP program requires further study to describe its impact on analgesic use.
PubMed ID
19483264 View in PubMed
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Across-province standardization and comparative analysis of time-to-care intervals for cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160988
Source
BMC Cancer. 2007;7:186
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Marcy Winget
Donna Turner
Jon Tonita
Charlotte King
Zoann Nugent
Riaz Alvi
Richard Barss
Author Affiliation
Medical Affairs and Community Oncology, Alberta Cancer Board, 10123-99 Street, Edmonton, Alberta, T5J 3H1, Canada. marcywin@cancerboard.ab.ca
Source
BMC Cancer. 2007;7:186
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Delivery of Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Manitoba - epidemiology
National Health Programs - standards - utilization
Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Time Factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
A set of consistent, standardized definitions of intervals and populations on which to report across provinces is needed to inform the Provincial/Territorial Deputy Ministries of Health on progress of the Ten-Year Plan to Strengthen Health Care. The objectives of this project were to: 1) identify a set of criteria and variables needed to create comparable measures of important time-to-cancer-care intervals that could be applied across provinces and 2) use the measures to compare time-to-care across participating provinces for lung and colorectal cancer patients diagnosed in 2004.
A broad-based group of stakeholders from each of the three participating cancer agencies was assembled to identify criteria for time-to-care intervals to standardize, evaluate possible intervals and their corresponding start and end time points, and finalize the selection of intervals to pursue. Inclusion/exclusion criteria were identified for the patient population and the selected time points to reduce potential selection bias. The provincial 2004 colorectal and lung cancer data were used to illustrate across-province comparisons for the selected time-to-care intervals.
Criteria identified as critical for time-to-care intervals and corresponding start and end points were: 1) relevant to patients, 2) relevant to clinical care, 3) unequivocally defined, and 4) currently captured consistently across cancer agencies. Time from diagnosis to first radiation or chemotherapy treatment and the smaller components, time from diagnosis to first consult with an oncologist and time from first consult to first radiation or chemotherapy treatment, were the only intervals that met all four criteria. Timeliness of care for the intervals evaluated was similar between the provinces for lung cancer patients but significant differences were found for colorectal cancer patients.
We identified criteria important for selecting time-to-care intervals and appropriate inclusion criteria that were robust across the agencies that did not result in an overly selective sample of patients to be compared. Comparisons of data across three provinces of the selected time-to-care intervals identified several important differences related to treatment and access that require further attention. Expanding this collaboration across Canada would facilitate improvement of and equitable access to quality cancer care at a national level.
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Aug 21;165(4):421-511531050
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2001;1:311319944
Cites: Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1994 Aug 30;30(1):221-88083117
Cites: Can J Surg. 2005 Apr;48(2):137-4215887794
Cites: Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1995 May 15;32(2):531-97751195
Cites: CMAJ. 1998 Jun 30;158(13):1735-409676551
Cites: BMJ. 1999 Jun 5;318(7197):150710355993
Cites: CMAJ. 1995 Feb 1;152(3):398-97828105
PubMed ID
17916257 View in PubMed
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Acute myocardial infarction. A feasibility study using record-linkage of routinely collected health information to create a two-year patient profile. Manitoba, 1984-85 and 1985-86.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103865
Source
Health Rep. 1990;2(4):305-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
H. Johansen
P. Paddon
K. Chagani
D. Hamilton
L. Kiss
S. Krawchuk
Author Affiliation
System Development Division, Statistics Canada.
Source
Health Rep. 1990;2(4):305-25
Date
1990
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Coronary Artery Bypass - statistics & numerical data
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Feasibility Studies
Female
Heart Function Tests - statistics & numerical data
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Medical Record Linkage
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - mortality
Sex Factors
Abstract
Manitoba's hospital separations and physician medical files were linked for the fiscal years 1984-85 and 1985-86. The result was a study file consisting of records for 5,293 males and 3,143 females, who, during this period, suffered an Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI), commonly called a heart attack. Merging the two types of files created a comprehensive data base for these AMI victims. The Manitoba age-sex standardized AMI rate was 38.0 per 10,000 population. Age-specific rates were higher for males than for females for all age groups. Hospitalized cases accounted for 7,201 individuals or 85.4% of AMI victims. Age-sex standardized rates of hospitalization per 10,000 population ranged from 27.1 in the Central region to 36.0 in the Westman region. The Manitoba age-specific rates of hospitalization for males in the 35-54 and 55-64 age groups were about three times the female rates for the same age groups. One quarter of AMI hospitalized victims died in hospital. The Manitoba age-specific death rates for males in the 35-54, 55-64 and 65-74 age groups were double the rates for females in the same age groups. Of the 8,436 AMI victims under study, 86.4% had at least one other concurrent medical condition such as angina, other forms of ischemic heart disease, diabetes, or hypertension. Of AMI victims, 93.8% underwent at least one of the following procedures: coronary artery bypass surgery, angiogram, electrocardiogram, cardiac catheterization, arteriography, or blood cholesterol testing. A higher percentage of procedures was performed on males than on females.
Notes
Erratum In: Health Rep 1991;3(1):97
PubMed ID
2101289 View in PubMed
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Adding up provincial expenditures on health care for Manitobans: a POPULIS project. Population Health Information System.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201448
Source
Med Care. 1999 Jun;37(6 Suppl):JS60-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
M. Shanahan
C. Steinbach
C. Burchill
D. Friesen
C. Black
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation, University of Sydney, Camperdown NSW, Australia.
Source
Med Care. 1999 Jun;37(6 Suppl):JS60-82
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Female
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research
Health Status Indicators
Home Care Services - economics
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Infant
Information Systems - organization & administration
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Mental Health Services - economics
Middle Aged
Mortality
Needs Assessment
Nursing Homes - economics
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Using the POPULIS framework, this project estimated health care expenditures across the entire population of Manitoba for inpatient and outpatient hospital utilization, physician visits, mental health inpatient, and nursing home utilization.
This estimated expenditure information was then used to compare per capita expenditures relative to premature mortality rates across the various areas of Manitoba.
Considerable variation in health care expenditures was found, with those areas having high premature mortality rates also having higher health care expenditures.
PubMed ID
10409018 View in PubMed
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Adult children of problem drinkers in an urban community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103202
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 1990 Feb;156:249-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1990
Author
N A el-Guebaly
J R Walker
C A Ross
R F Currie
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 1990 Feb;156:249-55
Date
Feb-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Parent-Child Relations
Prevalence
Urban Population
Abstract
In a medium-sized Canadian city, 581 randomly selected households were contacted and responded to a survey on the impact of parental alcohol problems. Twenty-two per cent of the respondents indicated that at least one of their parents had a drinking problem. The biological father was affected in 81%. Compared with the rest of the sample, the adult children of problem drinkers were younger but they did not differ in income or education. Adult children of problem drinkers were more likely to have parents who were divorced or separated; to be divorced, separated, or remarried themselves; to be heavy drinkers and have indications of alcohol problems; and to use more sources of help for problems with stress and anxiety and problems with alcohol. They did not differ from those without parental drinking problems on measures of current positive and negative affect.
PubMed ID
2317630 View in PubMed
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Age at acquisition of Helicobacter pylori in a pediatric Canadian First Nations population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4343
Source
Helicobacter. 2002 Apr;7(2):76-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Samir K Sinha
Bruce Martin
Michael Sargent
Jospeh P McConnell
Charles N Bernstein
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Helicobacter. 2002 Apr;7(2):76-85
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Antigens, Bacterial - analysis
Body Height
Child
Child, Preschool
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Feces - microbiology
Female
Helicobacter Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Helicobacter pylori - isolation & purification
Hemoglobins
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Occult Blood
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sanitation
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Few data exist regarding the epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infections in aboriginal, including the First Nations (Indian) or Inuit (Eskimo) populations of North America. We have previously found 95% of the adults in Wasagamack, a First Nations community in Northeastern Manitoba, Canada, are seropositive for H. pylori. We aimed to determine the age at acquisition of H. pylori among the children of this community, and if any association existed with stool occult blood or demographic factors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We prospectively enrolled children resident in the Wasagamack First Nation in August 1999. A demographic questionnaire was administered. Stool was collected, frozen and batch analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for H. pylori antigen and for the presence of occult blood. Questionnaire data were analyzed and correlated with the presence or absence of H. pylori. RESULTS: 163 (47%) of the estimated 350 children aged 6 weeks to 12 years, resident in the community were enrolled. Stool was positive for H. pylori in 92 (56%). By the second year of life 67% were positive for H. pylori. The youngest to test positive was 6 weeks old. There was no correlation of a positive H. pylori status with gender, presence of pets, serum Hgb, or stool occult blood. Forty-three percent of H. pylori positive and 24% of H. pylori negative children were
PubMed ID
11966865 View in PubMed
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Age distribution of infection and hospitalization among Canadian First Nations populations during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118146
Source
Am J Public Health. 2013 Feb;103(2):e39-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Luiz C Mostaço-Guidolin
Sherry M J Towers
David L Buckeridge
Seyed M Moghadas
Author Affiliation
Centre for Disease Modelling, York Institute for Health Research, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Public Health. 2013 Feb;103(2):e39-44
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Epidemiological Monitoring
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - ethnology
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - ethnology
Manitoba - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Pandemics - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
We estimated age-standardized ratios of infection and hospitalization among Canadian First Nations (FN) populations and compared their distributions with those estimated for non-FN populations in Manitoba, Canada.
For the spring and fall 2009 waves of the H1N1 pandemic, we obtained daily numbers of laboratory-confirmed and hospitalized cases of H1N1 infection, stratified by 5-year age groups and FN status. We calculated age-standardized ratios with confidence intervals for each wave and compared ratios between age groups in each ethnic group and between the 2 waves for FN and non-FN populations.
Incidence and hospitalization ratios in all FN age groups during the first wave were significantly higher than those in non-FN age groups (P
PubMed ID
23237152 View in PubMed
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Agent-based modeling of the spread of the 1918-1919 flu in three Canadian fur trading communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141452
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2010 Nov-Dec;22(6):757-67
Publication Type
Article
Author
Caroline A O'Neil
Lisa Sattenspiel
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211, USA. cahillen@yahoo.com
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2010 Nov-Dec;22(6):757-67
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Epidemics
History, 20th Century
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - history
Manitoba - epidemiology
Population Dynamics - history - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population - history - statistics & numerical data
Seasons
Abstract
Previous attempts to study the 1918-1919 flu in three small communities in central Manitoba have used both three-community population-based and single-community agent-based models. These studies identified critical factors influencing epidemic spread, but they also left important questions unanswered. The objective of this project was to design a more realistic agent-based model that would overcome limitations of earlier models and provide new insights into these outstanding questions.
The new model extends the previous agent-based model to three communities so that results can be compared to those from the population-based model. Sensitivity testing was conducted, and the new model was used to investigate the influence of seasonal settlement and mobility patterns, the geographic heterogeneity of the observed 1918-1919 epidemic in Manitoba, and other questions addressed previously.
Results confirm outcomes from the population-based model that suggest that (a) social organization and mobility strongly influence the timing and severity of epidemics and (b) the impact of the epidemic would have been greater if it had arrived in the summer rather than the winter. New insights from the model suggest that the observed heterogeneity among communities in epidemic impact was not unusual and would have been the expected outcome given settlement structure and levels of interaction among communities.
Application of an agent-based computer simulation has helped to better explain observed patterns of spread of the 1918-1919 flu epidemic in central Manitoba. Contrasts between agent-based and population-based models illustrate the advantages of agent-based models for the study of small populations.
PubMed ID
20721982 View in PubMed
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Age-related immunogenicity of meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine in aboriginal children and adolescents living in a Northern Manitoba reserve community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33624
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1998 Oct;17(10):860-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
B J Law
T. Rosenberg
N E MacDonald
F E Ashton
J C Huang
W J King
W J Ferris
G J Gray
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Canada. blaw@ms.umanitoba.ca
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1998 Oct;17(10):860-4
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Antibodies, Bacterial - biosynthesis
Bacterial Vaccines - immunology
Carrier State - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Infant
Manitoba - epidemiology
Meningococcal Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Meningococcal Vaccines
Neisseria meningitidis - classification - immunology - isolation & purification
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serotyping
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the total and functional serogroup C antibody response to a quadrivalent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine in a group of aboriginal infants, children and adolescents. A secondary objective was to determine their prevalence of meningococcal carriage. DESIGN: Open prospective, before and after intervention study. SUBJECTS: Aboriginal children ages 0.5 to 19.9 years, living in a single Northern community and eligible for a public health immunization campaign conducted in all Manitoba native reserve communities to control a meningococcal serogroup C, electrophoretic type (ET) 15 outbreak. No outbreak cases had occurred in the community at the time of the study. METHODS: Total serogroup C capsular polysaccharide antibody (CPA) and functional bactericidal antibody (BA) responses were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and bactericidal assay, respectively. RESULTS: Neisseria meningitidis was recovered from the oropharynx of 13 (5.2%) of 249 aboriginal children including 4 (1.6%) serogroup C isolates, all with the designation C:2a:P1.2,5 ET15. Paired sera from 152 children were available for assay. For CPA the geometric mean concentrations and proportions with > or =2 microg/ml before and after immunization were 0.69, 18% and 12.3, 96%, respectively. A significant increase in serum CPA was achieved by children of all ages, with the greatest response occurring after age 11 years. Among infants or =2 microg/ml. For BA the pre- and post-vaccine geometric mean titers were 1.02 and 45.9. The response was significantly associated with age. BA titers > or =1:8 were present, before and after immunization, respectively, in 0 and 0% of infants or =2-year-olds. CONCLUSION: The age-related total and functional group C meningococcal antibody response after quadrivalent polysaccharide vaccine among aboriginals is similar to that reported for Caucasian children. After age 2 all children made excellent CPA and BA responses. In the younger age groups the BA response was blunted but 82 to 95% achieved CPA titers of > or =2 microg/ml.
PubMed ID
9802625 View in PubMed
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607 records – page 1 of 61.