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1960 records – page 1 of 196.

25-year analysis of a dental undergraduate research training program (BSc Dent) at the University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154080
Source
J Dent Res. 2008 Dec;87(12):1085-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
J E Scott
J. de Vries
A M Iacopino
Author Affiliation
Oral Biology, University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
J Dent Res. 2008 Dec;87(12):1085-8
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aptitude Tests
Career Choice
Cohort Studies
Curriculum
Decision Making
Dental Research - education - trends
Education, Dental - trends
Education, Dental, Graduate - trends
Educational Measurement
Evidence-Based Dentistry - education
Faculty, Dental
Humans
Manitoba
Program Development
Schools, Dental - trends
Students, Dental
Abstract
Research in the context of the dental school has traditionally been focused on institutional/faculty accomplishments and generating new knowledge to benefit the profession. Only recently have significant efforts been made to expand the overall research programming into the formal dental curriculum, to provide students with a baseline exposure to the research and critical thinking processes, encourage evidence-based decision-making, and stimulate interest in academic/research careers. Various approaches to curriculum reform and the establishment of multiple levels of student research opportunities are now part of the educational fabric of many dental schools worldwide. Many of the preliminary reports regarding the success and vitality of these programs have used outcomes measures and metrics that emphasize cultural changes within institutions, student research productivity, and student career preferences after graduation. However, there have not been any reports from long-standing programs (a minimum of 25 years of cumulative data) that describe dental school graduates who have had the benefit of research/training experiences during their dental education. The University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry initiated a BSc Dent program in 1980 that awarded a formal degree for significant research experiences taking place within the laboratories of the Faculty-based researchers and has continued to develop and expand this program. The success of the program has been demonstrated by the continued and increasing demands for entry, the academic achievements of the graduates, and the numbers of graduates who have completed advanced education/training programs or returned to the Faculty as instructors. Analysis of our long-term data validates many recent hypotheses and short-term observations regarding the benefits of dental student research programs. This information may be useful in the design and implementation of dental student research programs at other dental schools.
PubMed ID
19029073 View in PubMed
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1979 diagnostic radiology services in the province of Manitoba.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242684
Source
J Can Assoc Radiol. 1982 Dec;33(4):246-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1982
Author
D W MacEwan
D E Gelskey
J R Lock
J. Popoff
A M Sourkes
Source
J Can Assoc Radiol. 1982 Dec;33(4):246-54
Date
Dec-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Manitoba
Radiation Dosage
Radiography - utilization
Radiology - economics - instrumentation - manpower
Rural Population
Urban Population
Abstract
This detailed study of a stable population compares the number and type of diagnostic radiology examinations, facilities, equipment, personnel and financial allocations for the years 1974 and 1979. The data have been obtained from $12.28 to $25.90. A computed tomography service began in 1977. The 1979 genetically significant radiation dose to the population is calculated to be 260 microgray. Continuing growth in computed tomography and diagnostic ultrasound with changing referrals for nuclear medicine are not yet ready for analysis.
PubMed ID
7161303 View in PubMed
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The 1990 Fraser Gurd Lecture: a Canadian trauma registry system--nine years experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226225
Source
J Trauma. 1991 Jun;31(6):856-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1991
Author
C M Burns
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Manitoba Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
J Trauma. 1991 Jun;31(6):856-66
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Manitoba - epidemiology
Registries
Wounds and injuries - classification - epidemiology
PubMed ID
2056552 View in PubMed
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Ability and accuracy of long-term weight recall by elderly males: the Manitoba follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161375
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2008 Jan;18(1):36-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Dennis J Bayomi
Robert B Tate
Author Affiliation
Manitoba Follow-up Study, Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. Dennis_Bayomi@umanitoba.ca
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2008 Jan;18(1):36-42
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Body Weight
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Manitoba
Memory - physiology
Mental Recall - physiology
Questionnaires
Weight Gain
Weight Loss
Abstract
To assess the ability and accuracy of elderly men to recall their weights and determine what characteristics might predict recall ability and accuracy.
Eight hundred sixty-nine elderly men (mean age, 84 years), participants of the Manitoba Follow-up Study (MFUS), responded to a questionnaire asking them to recall their weights at ages 20, 30, 50, and 65 years. Recalled weights were compared with measured weights collected since MFUS began in 1948. Logistic regression was used to predict ability and accuracy of weight recall.
Only 75% of respondents attempted to recall their weights at all 4 ages. Among men recalling 4 weights, fewer than half were accurate within +/- 10%, just 7% were within +/- 5% of their measured weights. Accuracy of recall was significantly and independently associated with body mass index during middle age (5 kg/m(2)) (odds ratio 0.83, 95% confidence interval: 0.76, 0.90) and weight change. Unmarried men were less likely than married men to attempt recalling all 4 weights. Men overweight at middle age were more likely to underestimate their recalled weights.
Studies relating weight in early adulthood or middle age with outcomes in later life should not rely on elderly male participants recalling those weights.
PubMed ID
17855121 View in PubMed
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The ability to achieve complete revascularization is associated with improved in-hospital survival in cardiogenic shock due to myocardial infarction: Manitoba cardiogenic SHOCK Registry investigators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134718
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2011 Oct 1;78(4):540-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2011
Author
Farrukh Hussain
Roger K Philipp
Robin A Ducas
Jason Elliott
Vladimír D┼żavík
Davinder S Jassal
James W Tam
Daniel Roberts
Philip J Garber
John Ducas
Author Affiliation
Section of Cardiology Dept. of Cardiac Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. fhussain@sbgh.mb.ca
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2011 Oct 1;78(4):540-8
Date
Oct-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - adverse effects - mortality
Cardiovascular Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Catheterization, Swan-Ganz
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects - mortality
Female
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - complications - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Odds Ratio
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Shock, Cardiogenic - diagnosis - etiology - mortality - therapy
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To identify predictors of survival in a retrospective multicentre cohort of patients with cardiogenic shock undergoing coronary angiography and to address whether complete revascularization is associated with improved survival in this cohort.
Early revascularization is the standard of care for cardiogenic shock. Coronary bypass grafting and percutaneous intervention have complimentary roles in achieving this revascularization.
A total of 210 consecutive patients (mean age 66 ± 12 years) at two tertiary centres from 2002 to 2006 inclusive with a diagnosis of cardiogenic shock were evaluated. Univariate and multivariate predictors of in-hospital survival were identified utilizing logistic regression.
ST elevation infarction occurred in 67% of patients. Thrombolysis was administered in 34%, PCI was attempted in 62% (88% stented, 76% TIMI 3 flow), CABG was performed in 22% (2.7 grafts, 14 valve procedures), and medical therapy alone was administered to the remainder. The overall survival to discharge was 59% (CABG 68%, PCI 57%, medical 48%). Independent predictors of mortality included complete revascularization (P = 0.013, OR = 0.26 (95% CI: 0.09-0.76), hyperlactatemia (P = 0.046, OR = 1.14 (95% CI: 1.002-1.3) per mmol increase), baseline renal insufficiency (P = 0.043, OR = 3.45, (95% CI: 1.04-11.4), and the presence of anoxic brain injury (P = 0.008, OR = 8.22 (95% CI: 1.73-39.1). Within the STEMI with concomitant multivessel coronary disease subgroup of this population (N = 101), independent predictors of survival to discharge included complete revascularization (P = 0.03, OR = 2.5 (95% CI: 1.1-6.2)) and peak lactate (P = 0.02).
The ability to achieve complete revascularization may be strongly associated with improved in-hospital survival in patients with cardiogenic shock.
Notes
Comment In: Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2011 Oct 1;78(4):549-5021953751
PubMed ID
21547996 View in PubMed
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Absence of posterior subcapsular cataracts in young patients treated with inhaled glucocorticoids.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220267
Source
Lancet. 1993 Sep 25;342(8874):776-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-1993
Author
F E Simons
M P Persaud
C A Gillespie
M. Cheang
E P Shuckett
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Canada.
Source
Lancet. 1993 Sep 25;342(8874):776-8
Date
Sep-25-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adolescent
Adult
Aerosols
Asthma - drug therapy
Beclomethasone - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Bronchodilator Agents - adverse effects
Budesonide
Cataract - chemically induced
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Patient compliance
Pregnenediones - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Abstract
The prevalence of posterior subcapsular cataracts in young patients receiving inhaled glucocorticoids for treatment of chronic asthma is unknown. In a cross-sectional study, slit-lamp examinations were done on 95 consecutive young patients who were taking inhaled beclomethasone or budesonide. No posterior subcapsular cataracts were found. The median age of the patients was 13.8 (range 5.8-24.8). The median dose of inhaled beclomethasone or budesonide was 750 micrograms/day (range 300-2000), or 12.9 micrograms/kg per day (range 7.5-34.2). The median duration of treatment was 5 years (range 1-15). 77% of the patients had not used oral glucocorticoids in the year preceding the examination. This study suggests that routine screening for posterior subcapsular cataracts in this patient population is not warranted.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1993 Nov 20;342(8882):1306-77901619
PubMed ID
8103877 View in PubMed
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Absolute fracture risk reporting in clinical practice: a physician-centered survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159036
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2008 Apr;19(4):459-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
W D Leslie
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba, 409 Tache Avenue, Winnipeg R2H 2A6 Manitoba, Canada. bleslie@sbgh.mb.ca
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2008 Apr;19(4):459-63
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Bone Density - physiology
Data Collection - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fractures, Bone - economics - prevention & control - radiography
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Osteoporosis - economics - physiopathology - radiotherapy
Physicians - statistics & numerical data
Professional Practice
Risk Assessment - economics - standards
Specialization - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Non-expert clinical practitioners who had received bone density reports based on 10-year absolute fracture risk were surveyed to determine their response to this new system. Absolute fracture risk reporting was well received and was strongly preferred to traditional T-score-based reporting. Non-specialist physicians were particularly supportive of risk-based bone mineral density (BMD) reporting.
Absolute risk estimation is preferable to risk categorization based upon BMD alone. The objective of this study was to specifically assess the response of non-expert clinical practitioners to this approach.
In January 2006, the Province of Manitoba, Canada, started reporting 10-year osteoporotic fracture risks for patients aged 50 years and older based on the hip T-score, gender, age, and multiple clinical risk factors. In May 2006 and October 2006, a brief anonymous survey was sent to all physicians who had requested a BMD test during 2005 and 206 responses were received.
When asked whether the report contained the information needed to manage patients, the mean score for the absolute fracture risk report was higher than for the T-score-based report (p
PubMed ID
18239957 View in PubMed
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Accepting parental responsibility: "future questioning" as a means to avoid foster home placement of children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224567
Source
Child Welfare. 1992 Jan-Feb;71(1):3-17
Publication Type
Article

Access and intensity of use of prescription analgesics among older Manitobans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150665
Source
Can J Clin Pharmacol. 2009;16(2):e322-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Cheryl A Sadowski
Anita G Carrie
Ruby E Grymonpre
Colleen J Metge
Phillip St John
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. csadowski@pharmacy.ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Clin Pharmacol. 2009;16(2):e322-30
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analgesics, Non-Narcotic - therapeutic use
Analgesics, Opioid - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Pain - drug therapy - epidemiology
Physician's Practice Patterns
Prescription Drugs
Residence Characteristics
Rural Population
Sex Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
Under-treatment of pain is frequently reported, especially among seniors, with chronic non-cancer pain most likely to be under-treated. Legislation regarding the prescribing/dispensing of opioid analgesics (including multiple prescription programs [MPP]) may impede access to needed analgesics.
To describe access and intensity of use of analgesics among older Manitobans by health region.
A cross-sectional study of non-Aboriginal non-institutionalized Manitoba residents over 65 years of age during April 1, 2002 to March 31, 2003 was conducted using the Pharmaceutical Claims data and the Cancer Registry from the province of Manitoba. Access to analgesics (users/1000/Yr) and intensity of use (using defined daily dose [DDD] methodology) were calculated for non-opioid analgesics, opioids, and multiple-prescription-program opioids [MPP-opioids]. Usage was categorized by age, gender, and stratified by cancer diagnosis. Age-sex standardized rates of prevalence and intensity are reported for the eleven health regions of Manitoba.
Thirty-four percent of older Manitobans accessed analgesics during the study period. Female gender, increasing age, and a cancer diagnosis were associated with greater access and intensity of use of all classes of analgesics. Age-sex standardized access and intensity measures revealed the highest overall analgesic use in the most rural / remote regions of the province. However, these same regions had the lowest use of opioids, and MPP-opioids among residents lacking a cancer diagnosis.
This population-based study of analgesic use suggests that there may be variations in use of opioids and other analgesics depending on an urban or rural residence. The impact of programs such as the MPP program requires further study to describe its impact on analgesic use.
PubMed ID
19483264 View in PubMed
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Accessing health services through the back door: a qualitative interview study investigating reasons why people participate in health research in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257231
Source
BMC Med Ethics. 2013;14:40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Anne Townsend
Susan M Cox
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of British Columbia, Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2B5, Canada. atownsen@exchange.ubc.ca.
Source
BMC Med Ethics. 2013;14:40
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Altruism
Biomedical research
British Columbia
Communication
Comprehension
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Motivation
Patient Selection
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Research Subjects - psychology
Therapeutic Misconception
Abstract
Although there is extensive information about why people participate in clinical trials, studies are largely based on quantitative evidence and typically focus on single conditions. Over the last decade investigations into why people volunteer for health research have become increasingly prominent across diverse research settings, offering variable based explanations of participation patterns driven primarily by recruitment concerns. Therapeutic misconception and altruism have emerged as predominant themes in this literature on motivations to participate in health research. This paper contributes to more recent qualitative approaches to understanding how and why people come to participate in various types of health research. We focus on the experience of participating and the meanings research participation has for people within the context of their lives and their health and illness biographies.
This is a qualitative exploratory study informed by grounded theory strategies. Thirty-nine participants recruited in British Columbia and Manitoba, Canada, who had taken part in a diverse range of health research studies participated in semi-structured interviews. Participants described their experiences of health research participation including motivations for volunteering. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using constant comparisons. Coding and data management was supported by Nvivo-7.
A predominant theme to emerge was 'participation in health research to access health services.' Participants described research as ways of accessing: (1) Medications that offered (hope of) relief; (2) better care; (3) technologies for monitoring health or illness. Participants perceived standard medical care to be a "trial and error" process akin to research, which further blurred the boundaries between research and treatment.
Our findings have implications for recruitment, informed consent, and the dichotomizing of medical/health procedures as either research or treatment. Those with low health status may be more vulnerable to potential coercion, suggesting the need for a more cautious approach to obtaining consent. Our findings also indicate the need for boundary work in order to better differentiate treatment and research. It is important however to acknowledge a categorical ambiguity; it is not always the case that people are misinformed about the possible benefits of research procedures (i.e., therapeutic misconception); our participants were aware that the primary purpose of research is to gain new knowledge yet they also identified a range of actual health benefits arising from their participation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24119203 View in PubMed
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1960 records – page 1 of 196.