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6-bit and 8-bit digital radiography for detecting simulated periodontal lesions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51165
Source
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1994 Apr;77(4):406-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
B. Pass
A J Furkart
S B Dove
W D McDavid
P H Gregson
Author Affiliation
Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1994 Apr;77(4):406-11
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Comparative Study
Contrast Sensitivity
Dental Caries - radiography
Humans
Mandible - radiography
Periodontal Diseases - radiography
ROC Curve
Radiographic Image Enhancement - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of a digital radiography system that uses 6- and 8-bit displays with conventional D-speed film for the detection of simulated periodontal bone lesions. Eleven human hemimandibles were used as specimens. Simulated lesions were created at the buccal cortical plate in the marginal bone area with the use of a round bur 1.4 mm in diameter. Lesions were created in a defined sequence to preclude visual cues as to the depth of the lesions. Lesion size progressed in 0.5 mm increments. At each stage the mandibles were imaged with a Sens-A-Ray system (REGAM Medical Systems AB, Sundsvall, Sweden) and D-speed film. Exposure parameters for each specimen/receptor combination were standardized by either the mean optical density or mean gray value at the approximal crestal bone area. Film images and digital images displayed with 64 and 256 gray levels were presented to six observers for evaluation. Observers were ask to rate their confidence as to the presence or absence of a lesion using a 5-point confidence scale. A total of 96 lesion sites and 96 control sites were presented to the observers. Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated for each system. The area under the curve was used as the index of diagnostic accuracy. The mean receiver operating characteristic areas for 6-bit and 8-bit displays and D-speed film were 0.746 +/- 0.043, 0.717 +/- 0.056 and 0.742 +/- 0.059, respectively. Analysis of variance was used to compare the means. No statistical difference was found between any of the three image displays (p > 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
8015807 View in PubMed
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Abnormal mandibular growth and the condylar cartilage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90327
Source
Eur J Orthod. 2009 Feb;31(1):1-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Pirttiniemi Pertti
Peltomäki Timo
Müller Lukas
Luder Hans U
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Development and Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland. pertti.pirttiniemi@oulu.fi
Source
Eur J Orthod. 2009 Feb;31(1):1-11
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Arthritis, Juvenile Rheumatoid - complications
Cartilage Diseases - etiology
Cartilage, Articular - abnormalities - growth & development - injuries
Child
Craniofacial Abnormalities - complications
Facial Asymmetry - complications
Humans
Hyperplasia
Mandible - abnormalities - growth & development
Mandibular Condyle - abnormalities - growth & development - injuries
Mandibular Diseases - etiology
Mandibular Fractures - complications
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - etiology
Abstract
Deviations in the growth of the mandibular condyle can affect both the functional occlusion and the aesthetic appearance of the face. The reasons for these growth deviations are numerous and often entail complex sequences of malfunction at the cellular level. The aim of this review is to summarize recent progress in the understanding of pathological alterations occurring during childhood and adolescence that affect the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and, hence, result in disorders of mandibular growth. Pathological conditions taken into account are subdivided into (1) congenital malformations with associated growth disorders, (2) primary growth disorders, and (3) acquired diseases or trauma with associated growth disorders. Among the congenital malformations, hemifacial microsomia (HFM) appears to be the principal syndrome entailing severe growth disturbances, whereas growth abnormalities occurring in conjunction with other craniofacial dysplasias seem far less prominent than could be anticipated based on their often disfiguring nature. Hemimandibular hyperplasia and elongation undoubtedly constitute the most obscure conditions that are associated with prominent, often unilateral, abnormalities of condylar, and mandibular growth. Finally, disturbances of mandibular growth as a result of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and condylar fractures seem to be direct consequences of inflammatory and/or mechanical damage to the condylar cartilage.
PubMed ID
19164410 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of clinical and radiological classification of the jawbone anatomy for implantation--a survey of 374 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181217
Source
J Oral Implantol. 2004;30(1):30-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Gintaras Juodzbalys
Aune M Raustia
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kaunas University of Medicine, Vainiku 12, LT-3018 Kaunas, Lithuania.
Source
J Oral Implantol. 2004;30(1):30-9
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alveolar Process - pathology - radiography
Atrophy
Cephalometry - instrumentation
Dental Arch - pathology - radiography
Dental Implantation, Endosseous
Dental Implants
Female
Humans
Jaw, Edentulous - classification - pathology - radiography
Male
Mandible - pathology - radiography
Maxilla - pathology - radiography
Middle Aged
Patient Care Planning
Radiography, Panoramic
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the anatomical features of edentulous jaw dental segments (eJDS) in order to offer the most reliable clinical and radiological classification of such segments in planning for implant treatment. A total of 374 patients, 156 men and 218 women, participated in the investigation. The mean age of the patients was 46 years (SD 12.7), ranging between 17 and 73 years. The eJDS were estimated by means of orthopantomogram, computerized tomography, and intraorally with special ridge-mapping callipers for measurement of alveolar process width. A total of 792 screw-shaped and 1-stage Osteofix Dental Implant System (Oulu, Finland) implants were inserted. Dental segments were divided according to the results of the commonly accepted eJDS assessments into 3 clinical-anatomical types. Type I indicated insignificant or no atrophy of eJDS (232 patients with 476 implant sites; 60.1% of the total number). Type II indicated mild to moderate vertical or horizontal atrophy of eJDS (100 patients with 222 sites; 28% of the total number). Type III indicated significant vertical or horizontal atrophy of eJDS (42 patients with 94 sites; 11.9% of the total number). The accuracy of the clinical and radiological classification was adjudged to have been 95.8%. By the process of establishing clinical and radiological classification of the jawbone segments, more reliability was anticipated regarding the insertion of implants both in maxillae and mandibles.
PubMed ID
15008452 View in PubMed
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Activity-induced dental modification in holocene siberian hunter-fisher-gatherers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100395
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2010 Oct;143(2):266-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Andrea Waters-Rist
Vladimir I Bazaliiskii
Andrzej Weber
Olga I Goriunova
M Anne Katzenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Archaeology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, T2N-1N4. awaters@ucalgary.ca
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2010 Oct;143(2):266-78
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asia, Central
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Fossils
Geography
History, Ancient
Humans
Male
Mandible
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Middle Aged
Occupations
Paleodontology
Sex Distribution
Siberia
Statistics, nonparametric
Tooth - anatomy & histology
Tooth Attrition
Abstract
The use of teeth as tools provides clues to past subsistence patterns and cultural practices. Five Holocene period hunter-fisher-gatherer mortuary sites from the south-western region of Lake Baikal, Siberia, Russian Federation, are observed for activity-induced dental modification (AIDM) to further characterize their adaptive regimes. Grooves on the occlusal surfaces of teeth are observed in 25 out of 123 individuals (20.3%) and were most likely produced during the processing of fibers from plants and animals, for making items such as nets and cordage. Regional variation in the frequency of individuals with occlusal grooves is found in riverine versus lakeshore sites. This variation suggests that production of material culture items differed, perhaps in relation to different fishing practices. There is also variation in the distribution of grooves by sex: grooves are found predominately in females, except at the Late Neolithic-Bronze Age river site of Ust'-Ida I where grooves are found exclusively in males. Occlusal grooves were cast using polyvinylsiloxane and maxillary canine impressions were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine striation patterns. Variation in striae orientation suggests that a variety of activities, and/or different manufacturing techniques, were involved in groove production. Overall, the variability in occlusal groove frequency, sex and regional distribution, and microscopic striae patterns, points to the multiplicity of activities and ways in which people used their mouths and teeth in cultural activities.
PubMed ID
20853480 View in PubMed
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Age and skeletal type-related changes of some cephalometric parameters in Finnish girls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230364
Source
Eur J Orthod. 1989 Aug;11(3):283-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1989
Author
K. Haavikko
A. Rahkamo
Source
Eur J Orthod. 1989 Aug;11(3):283-9
Date
Aug-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aging
Cephalometry
Child
Facial Bones - anatomy & histology
Female
Finland
Humans
Mandible - anatomy & histology
Maxilla - anatomy & histology
Reference Standards
Skull - anatomy & histology
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to define some cephalometric standards in a group of 217 Finnish girls from 7.0 to 18.0 years of age and furthermore to estimate the influence of the skeletal classes on these standards. Age-related changes were seen between the standards of the youngest (7.0-9.5 years) and the oldest (14.5-18.0 years) group where 9 out of 15 of the inspected angles increased with age, three of them ANPr***, SNPg** and SNB* significantly, and 6 decreased, four of them significantly: ANPg***, ANB**, NL/ML* and RL/ML*. The cranial base angles did not show any significant age-related or skeletal type-related variations. Between the skeletal groups I and II significant differences were seen in 11 variables. Between skeletal I and III groups, 7 angles were significantly different. The results demonstrate that when cephalometric standards are used, they should be derived from that population, they should be age related, and the skeletal pattern should be taken into account.
PubMed ID
2792217 View in PubMed
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Age differences in adult dentoalveolar heights.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226556
Source
Eur J Orthod. 1991 Apr;13(2):149-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1991
Author
A. Tallgren
B. Solow
Author Affiliation
Institute of Orthodontics, Royal Dental College, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Orthod. 1991 Apr;13(2):149-56
Date
Apr-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Alveolar Process - anatomy & histology
Cephalometry
Female
Finland
Humans
Incisor - anatomy & histology
Mandible - anatomy & histology
Maxilla - anatomy & histology
Middle Aged
Vertical Dimension
Abstract
A previous study of age differences in facial morphology in a dentate sample representing young, middle, and old age (Tallgren and Solow, 1987) indicated an increase in lower anterior face height during adulthood. The aim of the present study was to examine in detail the accompanying age differences in dentoalveolar heights. The material consisted of lateral head films of 191 dentate Finnish women divided into the age groups 20-29, 30-49, and 50-81 years. The present study comprised 26 variables calculated from digitized reference points. The maxillary and mandibular anterior dentoalveolar heights were significantly larger in the middle and old age groups than in the young group, and the mean differences were of the same magnitude for the maxilla and the mandible. Analysis of the dentoalveolar components showed that in the mandible the extra-alveolar height of the incisors was significantly larger in the two older age groups than in the young group, while no significant differences were found in the maxilla. The mean differences in anterior mandibular ridge height between the older age groups and the young group were smaller than in the maxilla. No significant differences in dentoalveolar morphology were observed between the middle and the old age groups.
PubMed ID
2055254 View in PubMed
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Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1994 Aug;52(4):234-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
A. Jokstad
I A Mjör
V. Qvist
Author Affiliation
Dental Faculty, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1994 Aug;52(4):234-42
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Composite Resins - chemistry
Cross-Sectional Studies
DMF Index
Dental Amalgam - chemistry
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Female
Glass Ionomer Cements - chemistry
Gold Alloys - chemistry
Humans
Male
Mandible
Maxilla
Middle Aged
Scandinavia
Time Factors
Abstract
In a cross-sectional survey the age of restorations in situ was recorded in three patient groups. Group A were randomly examined regular attenders, group B were irregular attenders randomly chosen from patient treatment records, and in group C the age of posterior gold and composite resin restorations was recorded in selected regular attenders. The study material included 8310 restorations in group A, 1281 in group B, and 500 restorations in group C. The three materials amalgam, composite, and gold accounted for more than 90% of all restorations. In group A 3.3% of the restorations were scheduled for replacement. The most prevalent reasons for replacement were secondary caries, bulk fractures of the restoration, and tooth fractures. The median age of the failed restorations was fairly similar to the median age of the acceptable restorations in situ among the regular patients (group A). The data indicate median ages of 20 years for gold restorations, 12-14 years for amalgam restorations, and 7-8 years for composite resin restorations. The restoration ages were influenced by the type and size of the restoration, the restorative material used, and possibly also the intra-oral location of the restorations.
PubMed ID
7985509 View in PubMed
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Alveolar arch dimensions and occlusal traits. An epidemiologic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238626
Source
Angle Orthod. 1985 Jul;55(3):234-41, 249-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1985
Author
T. Laine
Source
Angle Orthod. 1985 Jul;55(3):234-41, 249-50
Date
Jul-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cephalometry
Dental Arch - anatomy & histology
Dental Occlusion
Finland
Humans
Malocclusion - epidemiology
Mandible - anatomy & histology
Maxilla - anatomy & histology
Sex Factors
Abstract
A statistical evaluation of dentoalveolar relationships in a cross-section of young Finnish adults, finding little relationship between occlusal anomalies and dimensions of the alveolar arches.
PubMed ID
3863504 View in PubMed
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Alveolar arch dimensions, orthodontic treatment and absence of permanent teeth among Finnish students. An epidemiologic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238627
Source
Angle Orthod. 1985 Jul;55(3):225-33, 249-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1985
Author
T. Laine
H. Hausen
Source
Angle Orthod. 1985 Jul;55(3):225-33, 249-50
Date
Jul-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cephalometry
Dental Arch - anatomy & histology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mandible - anatomy & histology
Maxilla - anatomy & histology
Orthodontics, Corrective
Palate - anatomy & histology
Sex Factors
Tooth Extraction
Abstract
Statistical comparison of arch width, length and palatal height with age, sex, orthodontic treatment and extractions finds little correlation except a tendency for larger dimensions in males, especially in palatal width, and differences related to postextraction drift.
PubMed ID
3863503 View in PubMed
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Anaesthesiological airway management in Denmark: assessment, equipment and documentation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181387
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2004 Mar;48(3):350-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
P F Mellado
L P Thunedborg
F. Swiatek
M S Kristensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia, The Abdominal Centre, Section 2043, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Denmark.
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2004 Mar;48(3):350-4
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Anesthesia
Anesthesia Department, Hospital
Denmark
Fiber Optic Technology
Humans
Intubation, Intratracheal - instrumentation - methods
Laryngeal Masks
Laryngoscopes
Mandible - physiology
Medical Records
Movement
Neck - anatomy & histology - physiology
Needs Assessment
Patient Care Planning
Respiration
Abstract
Failed intubation remains one cause of anaesthesia-related morbidity and mortality. In a recent survey in Denmark, 20% of respondents reported preventable mishaps in airway management.
Assessment of the airway, and its documentation, as well as the availability of various equipment to manage a difficult airway, and the existence of a failed intubation plan were surveyed by mailing a questionnaire to the clinical directors of all 69 anaesthesia departments in Denmark.
Fifty-six departments (81%) returned the questionnaire. Pre-operative airway evaluation is performed in 90% of the departments. The tests included the mouth-opening test (77%), Mallampati score (48%), lower jaw protrusion (34%), neck mobility (63%), the measurement of the thyromental (11%) and sternomental distance (4%). The result of the tests are documented by 38% of the departments in the anaesthetic chart (96%), in the record (54%), on a card given to the patient (23%), in a letter sent to the patient's general practitioner (2%) or in a database (13%). The patients are personally informed in 82% of the departments. Only 54% of the departments have a failed intubation plan readily available.
The preoperative assessment of the airways and its documentation is still unsatisfactory, as is communicating with the patient after a case of a difficult/impossible intubation. The adoption of internationally recognized recommendations might improve airway management and teaching to the best standard possible in the already well-equipped Danish anaesthetic departments.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2005 Jan;49(1):12815676006
PubMed ID
14982570 View in PubMed
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247 records – page 1 of 25.