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Community treatment orders: beyond hospital utilization rates examining the association of community treatment orders with community engagement and supportive housing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148746
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2009 Dec;45(6):415-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Ann-Marie O'Brien
Susan J Farrell
Sylvie Faulkner
Author Affiliation
Carleton University, Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre, Ottawa, ON, Canada. aobrien@rohcg.on.ca
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2009 Dec;45(6):415-9
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Catchment Area (Health)
Community Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Community-Institutional Relations
Female
Humans
Male
Mandatory Programs - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Middle Aged
Public Housing - statistics & numerical data
Social Support
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to examine the association of community treatment orders (CTO) with community engagement and housing arrangements for one population of psychiatric patients in Ontario, Canada. Socio demographic characteristics and health service utilization information were collected for each patient placed on a CTO during a 3 year period. Information was collected for each of the 84 patients when a CTO was first issued and then updated to reflect both the patient's ongoing involvement with the legislation and related clinical outcomes. A significant increase in the number of community services and a shift to supportive housing arrangements was found for patients following issuance of a CTO.
PubMed ID
19728089 View in PubMed
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The compliant court--procedural fairness and social control in compulsory community care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265094
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2014 Nov-Dec;37(6):543-50
Publication Type
Article
Author
Liv Zetterberg
Stefan Sjöström
Urban Markström
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2014 Nov-Dec;37(6):543-50
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Commitment of Mentally Ill - legislation & jurisprudence
Community Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Dangerous Behavior
Databases, Factual
Female
Humans
Male
Mandatory Programs - legislation & jurisprudence
Mental Disorders - therapy
Mentally Ill Persons - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Control, Formal
Social Justice - legislation & jurisprudence
Sweden
Abstract
Compulsory community care (CCC) was introduced in Sweden in 2008. This article investigates all written court decisions regarding CCC over a 6 month period in 2009 (N=541). The purpose is to examine how the legal rights of patients are protected and what forms of social control patients are subjected to. 51% of CCC patients are women and 84% are being treated for a psychosis-related disorder. In the court decisions, only 9% of patients are described as dangerous to themselves, while 18% are regarded a danger to others. The most common special provisions that patients are subjected to are medication (79%) and a requirement that they must maintain contact with either community mental health services (51%) or social services (27%). In the decisions, both the courts and court-appointed psychiatrists agree with treating psychiatrists in 99% of cases. Decisions lack transparency and clarity, and it is often impossible to understand the conclusions of the courts. There is considerable variation between regional courts as regards the provisions to which patients are subjected and the delegation of decision-making to psychiatrists. This means that decisions fail to demonstrate clarity, transparency, consistency and impartiality, and thus fail to meet established standards of procedural fairness. Surveillance techniques of social control are more common than techniques based on therapy or sanctions. Because of the unique role of medication, social control is primarily imposed on a physical dimension, as opposed to temporal and spatial forms. The article concludes that patients are at risk of being subjected to new forms of social control of an unclear nature without proper legal protection.
PubMed ID
24656218 View in PubMed
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Conceptual carpentry as problem handling: the case of drugs and coercive treatment in social democratic welfare regimes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260291
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2014 Mar;25(2):320-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Johan Edman
Kerstin Stenius
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2014 Mar;25(2):320-8
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland
Health Policy
Humans
Mandatory Programs - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Policy Making
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Sweden
Abstract
The drug and alcohol fields are characterised by continuous contestations of key concepts and the competing uses of concepts by various actors, in different geographies and over time. This study investigates the political processes leading to legislation enabling coercive treatment of (non-psychotic) drug users in Finland and Sweden from the 1950s until the early 1980s. The drug treatment policies are analysed through conceptual changes and innovations.
The article analyses conceptual discussions in public reports in Finland and Sweden, focusing on the work preceding the first legislations where both alcohol and drug treatment were included (in Finland 1961, in Sweden 1982). Theories from conceptual history are applied.
The Finnish and Swedish discussions carry arguments from two periods of the Nordic welfare state: in an early development stage and a fragile situation in Finland, and in a more mature and affluent time in Sweden. The paternalistic arguments vary over time and between countries. Still, in both countries and time periods, the view of the drug problem as a youth issue, as particularly enslaving and on society's obligation to protect drug using individuals from damaging their future give enough motivation for coercive treatment. The conceptual work included avoidance of certain terms but in other cases, a broadening of their meaning, to adopt them to the political goals.
Close analyses of conceptual history can reveal new features of drug policy struggles and show how central concepts in drugs and alcohol field are continuously contested.
PubMed ID
24268436 View in PubMed
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From "tough on crime" to "smart on crime".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149573
Source
CMAJ. 2009 Aug 4;181(3-4):232
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-4-2009
Author
Patricia Allard
Author Affiliation
Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network, Toronto, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 2009 Aug 4;181(3-4):232
Date
Aug-4-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Crime - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Criminal Law
Disease Transmission, Infectious - prevention & control
HIV Infections - prevention & control - transmission
Humans
Mandatory Programs - legislation & jurisprudence
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Notes
Cites: HIV AIDS Policy Law Rev. 2007 Dec;12(2-3):12-718459192
PubMed ID
19620263 View in PubMed
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The impact of mandatory versus voluntary participation in the Alberta ignition interlock program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168651
Source
Traffic Inj Prev. 2003 Jan;4 Suppl 1:24-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
D J Beirness
P R Marques
R B Voas
A S Tippetts
Author Affiliation
Traffic Injury Research Foundation, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. dougb@trafficinjuryresearch.com
Source
Traffic Inj Prev. 2003 Jan;4 Suppl 1:24-7
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control
Adult
Alberta
Alcoholic Intoxication - diagnosis - prevention & control
Automobile Driving - legislation & jurisprudence
Automobiles
Female
Humans
Male
Mandatory Programs - legislation & jurisprudence
Program Evaluation
Protective Devices - utilization
Voluntary Programs
Abstract
Research has demonstrated that participation in an interlock program significantly reduces the likelihood of subsequent driving while intoxicated (DWI) convictions at least so long as the interlock device is installed in the vehicle. Despite the growing number of jurisdictions that allow interlock programs and the demonstrated success of these programs, the proportion of DWI offenders who actually have the device installed is minimal. In an effort to increase the proportion of offenders using interlocks, some jurisdictions require offenders to install an interlock as a condition of license reinstatement whereas others merely offer offenders a reduction in the period of hard suspension if they voluntarily participate in an interlock program. The objective of the present study was to determine the extent to which voluntary interlock participants are more or less successful in terms of subsequent recidivism than those for whom interlock program participation has been mandated. The issue was addressed using data from the interlock program in Alberta, Canada, which provides for both mandatory and voluntary participation. The recidivism experience of voluntary and mandatory interlock participants was examined both during and after the period of interlock installation. Cox regression revealed that, after controlling for (or equating) the number of prior DWI offenses, the survival rates of DWI offenders who were ordered to participate in the interlock program did not differ from those of voluntary participants. These results suggest that further use of mandatory interlock programs should be just as successful as voluntary programs when offenders share characteristics with those studied in Alberta.
PubMed ID
16801126 View in PubMed
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Influenza vaccination for health care workers: towards a workable and effective standard.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153395
Source
Health Law J. 2009;17:297-337
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Rebecca Rodal
Nola M Ries
Kumanan Wilson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario. rebecca.rodal@utoronto.ca
Source
Health Law J. 2009;17:297-337
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Personnel
Humans
Immunization Programs - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Influenza, Human - prevention & control - virology
Mandatory Programs - legislation & jurisprudence
Personal Autonomy
PubMed ID
20608322 View in PubMed
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Mandated collaboration: the case of the forensic MOU.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179706
Source
Health Law Can. 2004 Apr;24(3):29-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Steve Lurie
Author Affiliation
Canadian Mental Health Association, Metro Toronto Branch
Source
Health Law Can. 2004 Apr;24(3):29-36
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Forensic Psychiatry - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Interinstitutional Relations
Mandatory Programs - legislation & jurisprudence
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient care team
Power (Psychology)
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
The management and support of forensic clients is an area of interest to both clinicians and policy makers. Collaboration between hospital and community service providers is required and in some instances, mandated. This article reviews some of the literature about collaboration and examines selected experiences in the mental health field using a case study method. The case study examines the process of mandated collaboration in the development of the forensic MOU (memorandum of understanding), which involved CMHA Metro Toronto, and three general hospital ACT (assertive community treatment) teams and the Law and Mental Health Program at the Centre for Addiction Mental Health. The article offers observations on the extent to which collaboration is an emergent process that is responsive to its particular environment and explores power dynamics and how trust and flexibility affect outcomes in a positive or negative sense.
PubMed ID
15192936 View in PubMed
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Mandatory and recommended vaccination in the EU, Iceland and Norway: results of the VENICE 2010 survey on the ways of implementing national vaccination programmes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123548
Source
Euro Surveill. 2012;17(22)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
M. Haverkate
F. D'Ancona
C. Giambi
K. Johansen
P L Lopalco
V. Cozza
E. Appelgren
Author Affiliation
Radboud University, Nijmegen, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
Source
Euro Surveill. 2012;17(22)
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Communicable Disease Control - standards
Communicable Diseases - immunology
European Union
Guideline Adherence - standards
Health Care Surveys
Health Plan Implementation
Health Policy
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Immunization Programs
Immunization Schedule
Mandatory Programs - legislation & jurisprudence
Mass Vaccination - methods - organization & administration
National Health Programs
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Public Health Practice - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
This report provides an updated overview of recommended and mandatory vaccinations in the European Union (EU), Iceland and Norway, considering the differences in vaccine programme implementation between countries. In 2010, the Vaccine European New Integrated Collaboration Effort (VENICE) network, conducted a survey among the VENICE project gatekeepers to learn more about how national vaccination programmes are implemented, whether recommended or mandatory. Information was collected from all 27 EU Member States, Iceland and Norway. In total 15 countries do not have any mandatory vaccinations; the remaining 14 have at least one mandatory vaccination included in their programme. Vaccination against polio is mandatory for both children and adults in 12 countries; diphtheria and tetanus vaccination in 11 countries and hepatitis B vaccination in 10 countries. For eight of the 15 vaccines considered, some countries have a mixed strategy of recommended and mandatory vaccinations. Mandatory vaccination may be considered as a way of improving compliance to vaccination programmes. However, compliance with many programmes in Europe is high, using only recommendations. More information about the diversity in vaccine offer at European level may help countries to adapt vaccination strategies based on the experience of other countries. However, any proposal on vaccine strategies should be developed taking into consideration the local context habits.
PubMed ID
22687916 View in PubMed
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23 records – page 1 of 3.