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[Circulation of West Nile virus (Flaviviridae, Flavivirus) and some other arboviruses in the ecosystems of Volga delta, Volga-Akhtuba flood-lands and adjoining arid regions (2000-2002)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179767
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2004 May-Jun;49(3):45-51
Publication Type
Article
Author
D K L'vov
A I Kovtunov
K B Iashkulov
V L Gromashevskii
A F Dzharkenov
M Iu Shchelkanov
L N Kulikova
H M Savage
N M Chimidova
L B Mikhaliaeva
A V Vasil'ev
I V Galkina
A G Prilipov
R M Kinney
E I Samokhvalov
B Ts Bushkieva
D J Gubler
S K Al'khovskii
V A Aristova
P G Deriabin
A M Butenko
T M Moskvina
D N L'vov
L V Zlobina
O V Liapina
G K Sadykova
A G Shatalov
V E Usachev
A G Voronina
L I Luneva
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2004 May-Jun;49(3):45-51
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic - blood
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Arbovirus Infections - blood - epidemiology - veterinary - virology
Arboviruses - isolation & purification
Birds - virology
Bunyamwera virus - isolation & purification
Culicidae - virology
Disease Reservoirs
Disease Vectors
Ecology
Ecosystem
Hemorrhagic Fever Virus, Crimean-Congo - isolation & purification
Humans
Ixodidae - virology
Mammals - virology
Phylogeny
Russia - epidemiology
Thogotovirus - isolation & purification
West Nile Fever - blood - epidemiology - veterinary
West Nile virus - isolation & purification - pathogenicity - physiology
Zoonoses
Abstract
Comprehensive virological, serological as well as genetic studies of the ecology of West Nile Virus (WNV) as well as of some other arboviruses were undertaken in different ecosystems in the territories of the Astrakhan Region and of the Kalmyk Republic. The main carriers (mosquitoes, ticks, birds and mammals) were defined as involved in the circulation of viruses within the natural and anthropogenic biocenosis. Phylogenetic examinations of isolated strains and samples, which were positive in RT-PCR, showed an absolute predominance of genotype I virus that was most closely related to American and Israeli strains. At the same time, epidemic strains had up to 6% of nucleotide differences versus the historic strains isolated in the same region 20-30 years ago. Besides, the circulation of genotype IV was discovered; it was characterized by a lower pathogenicity, which, possibly, ensures the shaping of a pronounced immune interlayer bearing no epidemic consequences. An analysis of the study results on the WNV ecology denotes the epicenter of the endemic territory located in the middle part of the Volga delta.
PubMed ID
15188655 View in PubMed
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[CRITERIA OF DIFFERENCE EVALUATION FOR VARIOUS TYPES OF HEMORRHAGIC FEVER WITH RENAL SYNDROME FOCI. HFRS FOCI IN VARIOUS BIOTOPES OF TYPICAL BARRENS].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265877
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2015 May-Jun;(3):67-72
Publication Type
Article
Author
M A Tarasov
S B Garanina
U A Kresova
A M Porshakov
M N Lyapin
A V Ryabova
S I Tolokonnikova
M M Shilov
A I Udovikov
G V Grigorieva
S A Yakovlev
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2015 May-Jun;(3):67-72
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Disease Outbreaks
Disease Reservoirs
Hantavirus - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome - epidemiology - transmission - virology
Humans
Mammals - virology
Russia
Zoonoses - epidemiology - virology
Abstract
Examine features of natural, natural-anthropourgic and anthropourgic foci of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in various, mostly forest, biotopes of typical barrens due to differences of non-specific HFRS prophylaxis in foci of various types.
Epizootological and epidemiologic data from 1998 to 2012 were analyzed, gathered in HFRS foci of all types in Saratov area of Saratov Region (typical barrens). 14,606 trap-nights were worked off and 2669 small mammals were procured. The most significant population-ecologic and ecologic-epizootological methods and criteria were used for comparative analysis of differences for 3 types of foci.
Based on analysis of multi-year data seasonal differences for HFRS foci of various types were shown by 10 population-ecologic and ecologic-epizootologic criteria.
The results obtained allow to state that modern means and methods of non-specific prophylaxis of HFRS and other zoonoses in foci of various types different significantly. This allows the most rational use of material and financial resources.
PubMed ID
26259273 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of Sindbis virus infections in Finland 1981-96: possible factors explaining a peculiar disease pattern.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187991
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2002 Oct;129(2):335-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
M. Brummer-Korvenkontio
O. Vapalahti
P. Kuusisto
P. Saikku
T. Manni
P. Koskela
T. Nygren
H. Brummer-Korvenkontio
A. Vaheri
Author Affiliation
Haartman Institute, Department of Virology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2002 Oct;129(2):335-45
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alphavirus Infections - blood - epidemiology - etiology - transmission
Animals
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Birds - virology
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Geography
Hemagglutination inhibition tests
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical
Male
Mammals - virology
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Retrospective Studies
Seasons
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sex Factors
Sindbis Virus - immunology - isolation & purification
Abstract
Pogosta disease (PD), an epidemic rash-arthritis occurring in late summer is caused by Sindbis virus (SINV) and is transmitted to humans by mosquitoes. Altogether 2183 PD cases were serologically confirmed 1981-96 in Finland, with an annual incidence of 2.7/100000 (18 in the most endemic area of Northern Karelia). The annual average was 136 (varying from 1 to 1282) with epidemics occurring in August-September with a 7-year interval. Studies on 6320 patients with suspected rubella (1973-89) revealed 107 PD cases. The depth of snow cover and the temperature in May-July seemed to predict the number of cases. The morbidity was highest in 45- to 65-year-old females and lowest in children. Subclinical SINV infections were 17 times more common than the clinical ones. The SINV-antibody prevalence in fertile-age females was 0.6% in 1992; the estimated seroprevalence in Finland is about 2%. Among game animals the tetraonids (black grouse and capercaillie) had the highest seroprevalence (65%) in the epidemic year of 1981.
PubMed ID
12403109 View in PubMed
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Novel Orthopoxvirus Infection in an Alaska Resident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289944
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2017 Jun 15; 64(12):1737-1741
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Date
Jun-15-2017
Author
Yuri P Springer
Christopher H Hsu
Zachary R Werle
Link E Olson
Michael P Cooper
Louisa J Castrodale
Nisha Fowler
Andrea M McCollum
Cynthia S Goldsmith
Ginny L Emerson
Kimberly Wilkins
Jeffrey B Doty
Jillybeth Burgado
JinXin Gao
Nishi Patel
Matthew R Mauldin
Mary G Reynolds
Panayampalli S Satheshkumar
Whitni Davidson
Yu Li
Joseph B McLaughlin
Author Affiliation
Alaska Division of Public Health, Section of Epidemiology, Anchorage.
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2017 Jun 15; 64(12):1737-1741
Date
Jun-15-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Antibodies, Viral - blood
DNA, Viral - blood
Female
Fomites - virology
Humans
Mammals - virology
Microscopy, Electron
Middle Aged
Orthopoxvirus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - ultrastructure
Phylogeny
Poxviridae Infections - diagnosis - virology
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Skin - pathology - virology
Abstract
Human infection by orthopoxviruses is being reported with increasing frequency, attributed in part to the cessation of smallpox vaccination and concomitant waning of population-level immunity. In July 2015, a female resident of interior Alaska presented to an urgent care clinic with a dermal lesion consistent with poxvirus infection. Laboratory testing of a virus isolated from the lesion confirmed infection by an Orthopoxvirus.
The virus isolate was characterized by using electron microscopy and nucleic acid sequencing. An epidemiologic investigation that included patient interviews, contact tracing, and serum testing, as well as environmental and small-mammal sampling, was conducted to identify the infection source and possible additional cases.
Neither signs of active infection nor evidence of recent prior infection were observed in any of the 4 patient contacts identified. The patient's infection source was not definitively identified. Potential routes of exposure included imported fomites from Azerbaijan via the patient's cohabiting partner or wild small mammals in or around the patient's residence. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that the virus represents a distinct and previously undescribed genetic lineage of Orthopoxvirus, which is most closely related to the Old World orthopoxviruses.
Investigation findings point to infection of the patient after exposure in or near Fairbanks. This conclusion raises questions about the geographic origins (Old World vs North American) of the genus Orthopoxvirus. Clinicians should remain vigilant for signs of poxvirus infection and alert public health officials when cases are suspected.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28329402 View in PubMed
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[Species composition of mosquitoes (Diptera, Culicidae) and possibility of the West Nile virus natural foci formation in the South of Western Siberia]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86243
Source
Parazitologiia. 2007 Nov-Dec;41(6):459-70
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kononova Iu V
Mirzaeva A G
Smirnova Iu A
Protopopova E V
Dupal T A
Ternovoi V A
Iurchenko Iu A
Shestopalov A M
Loktev V B
Source
Parazitologiia. 2007 Nov-Dec;41(6):459-70
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antigens, Viral - isolation & purification
Brain - immunology - virology
Culicidae - classification
Disease Reservoirs - veterinary - virology
Insect Vectors - classification
Mammals - virology
Mosquito control
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Population Density
RNA, Viral - analysis
Siberia - epidemiology
West Nile Fever - prevention & control
West Nile virus - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
Abstract
In 2004 June-July collections of mosquito adults and small mammals were carried out in two areas of Novosibirsk Region (forest-steppe and steppe zones), where the West Nile virus (WNV) was for the first time recorded in birds with different migration status in 2002-2004. Seventeen species of mosquitoes were found; significant changes in their species composition and abundance, as compared with latest faunistic studies made in the sixties-seventies of the last century, are revealed. WNV markers (antigen, RNA) are found in small mammals; highly sensitive to the WNV replication mosquito species are also found. These facts allow supposing a possibility of the formation of stable West Nile virus natural foci in the South of Western Siberia, under conditions of forest-steppe and steppe zones.
PubMed ID
18411647 View in PubMed
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Tick-borne encephalitis virus isolates from natural foci of the Irkutsk region: clarification of the genotype landscape.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289568
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2016; 61(5):229-34
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Ol'ga V Mel'nikova
R V Adel'shin
V M Korzun
Yu N Trushina
E I Andaev
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2016; 61(5):229-34
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Disease Vectors
Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne - epidemiology - transmission - veterinary - virology
Female
Genome, Viral
Genotype
Humans
Ixodes - virology
Mammals - virology
Mice
Phylogeny
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
The Irkutsk region is the unique territory where all known subtypes of tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) circulate. In the last years, the phenomenon of changes in TBEV subtypes (substitution of the Far-Eastern subtype by the Siberian one) was noted in some regions of the Russian Federation. The results of individual investigation of 11522 Ixodes persulcatus ticks and brain specimens from 81 small mammals collected in natural foci of the Irkutsk region during 2006-2014 are presented in the article. More than 60 TBEV strains have been isolated and studied by virological methods; E gene fragments (1193 b.p.) of 68 isolates have been typed. The majority of the strains (irrespective of subtype) were of high virulence for laboratory mice (LM) in case of both intracerebral and subcutaneous inoculation of virus. All isolates from warm-blooded small mammals and humans were of high virulence for LM, but placed in the same clusters of the phylogenetic tree with ticks collected in the same area. Tick-borne strains of different virulence also did not form separate clusters on the tree. Phylogenetic analysis showed that modern TBEV genotypic landscape of the studied territory is changing toward absolute predominance of the Siberian subtype (94.1%). This subtype is represented by two groups with prototype strains “Zausaev” and “Vasilchenko”. The “Vasilchenko” group of strains is spread on the whole territory under study; the strains of “Zausaev” group were isolated previously in the Irkutsk suburbs. The European subtype of TBEV circulates in natural foci of Pribaikalie permanently (at least 5% of the random sampling); the strains are of high virulence for LM. The Far-Eastern TBEV subtype was not found within the group of isolates collected in 20062014. The phylogenetic relationship of the strains under study had a higher correlation with the place of isolation than with the year or source.
PubMed ID
29323856 View in PubMed
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Tick-borne encephalitis virus isolates from natural foci of the Irkutsk region: clarification of the genotype landscape.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289726
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2016; 61(5):229-34
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Ol'ga V Mel'nikova
R V Adel'shin
V M Korzun
Yu N Trushina
E I Andaev
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2016; 61(5):229-34
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Disease Vectors
Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne - epidemiology - transmission - veterinary - virology
Female
Genome, Viral
Genotype
Humans
Ixodes - virology
Mammals - virology
Mice
Phylogeny
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
The Irkutsk region is the unique territory where all known subtypes of tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) circulate. In the last years, the phenomenon of changes in TBEV subtypes (substitution of the Far-Eastern subtype by the Siberian one) was noted in some regions of the Russian Federation. The results of individual investigation of 11522 Ixodes persulcatus ticks and brain specimens from 81 small mammals collected in natural foci of the Irkutsk region during 2006-2014 are presented in the article. More than 60 TBEV strains have been isolated and studied by virological methods; E gene fragments (1193 b.p.) of 68 isolates have been typed. The majority of the strains (irrespective of subtype) were of high virulence for laboratory mice (LM) in case of both intracerebral and subcutaneous inoculation of virus. All isolates from warm-blooded small mammals and humans were of high virulence for LM, but placed in the same clusters of the phylogenetic tree with ticks collected in the same area. Tick-borne strains of different virulence also did not form separate clusters on the tree. Phylogenetic analysis showed that modern TBEV genotypic landscape of the studied territory is changing toward absolute predominance of the Siberian subtype (94.1%). This subtype is represented by two groups with prototype strains “Zausaev” and “Vasilchenko”. The “Vasilchenko” group of strains is spread on the whole territory under study; the strains of “Zausaev” group were isolated previously in the Irkutsk suburbs. The European subtype of TBEV circulates in natural foci of Pribaikalie permanently (at least 5% of the random sampling); the strains are of high virulence for LM. The Far-Eastern TBEV subtype was not found within the group of isolates collected in 20062014. The phylogenetic relationship of the strains under study had a higher correlation with the place of isolation than with the year or source.
PubMed ID
29323856 View in PubMed
Less detail

West Nile virus and other zoonotic viruses in Russia: examples of emerging-reemerging situations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180296
Source
Arch Virol Suppl. 2004;(18):85-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
D K Lvov
A M Butenko
V L Gromashevsky
A I Kovtunov
A G Prilipov
R. Kinney
V A Aristova
A F Dzharkenov
E I Samokhvalov
H M Savage
M Y Shchelkanov
I V Galkina
P G Deryabin
D J Gubler
L N Kulikova
S K Alkhovsky
T M Moskvina
L V Zlobina
G K Sadykova
A G Shatalov
D N Lvov
V E Usachev
A G Voronina
Author Affiliation
D. I. Ivanovsky Institute of Virology RAMS, Moscow, Russia. dk_lvov@mail.ru
Source
Arch Virol Suppl. 2004;(18):85-96
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic - virology
Culicidae - virology
Ecosystem
Genetic Variation
Geography
Humans
Mammals - virology
Rats
Russia - epidemiology
Ticks - virology
West Nile Fever - epidemiology - transmission
West Nile virus - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Zoonoses
Abstract
Studies of the interactions of vertebrates, viruses and arthropod vectors of these viruses were monitored in terms of different ecological groups of viruses transmitted by mosquitoes and ticks in Northern Eurasia in an area encompassing more than 15 million km2. About 90 viruses were isolated, including 24 new to science. Newly recognized infections of vertebrates, including humans, were described. Many unusual epidemic situations were analysed. Permanent efforts were established to prevent bioterrorist activities and their consequences. Extensive epidemic outbreaks of West Nile fever (WNF; i.e., fever caused by West Nile virus) and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) with unusual high mortality appeared in the last four years in southern Russia. We determined infection rates in humans, domestic and wild animals, mosquitoes and ticks from natural and synanthropic biocenoses [Editorial note: "synanthropic" means, roughly, all species living with (c.f. lice, fleas) or near people, such as in houses (c.f. house mice), parks (c.f. Rattus spp.), and the like, rather like "peridomestic", but not strictly so; "biocenosis" is the biome, the "totality of living populations in a particular habitat, which itself is only a part of the ecosystem".]. CCHF virus strains were phylogenetically similar to strains isolated in this area 35 years ago but different from Central-South-Asian and African strains. Before the outset of the current emergence of epidemic WNF, three genetic variants of this virus had been isolated in USSR, two African and one Indian. Phylogenetic analysis of complete genome sequences of epidemic strains demonstrated considerable similarity to strains from USA and Israel and differences from strains isolated in the same USSR areas 20-30 years before. In addition to strains of genotype 1, we isolated strains of second and third lineages and a strain of a fourth genetic variant. Nucleotide differences of these strains from all three genotypes was about 30%. The emerging WNF situation in Russia for the last 4 years probably has been the result of not only natural and social factors, but also to introduction of more virulent strains or by evolution of the virus.
PubMed ID
15119764 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.