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Abscess infections and malnutrition--a cross-sectional study of polydrug addicts in Oslo, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262831
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2014 Jun;74(4):322-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Mone Saeland
Margareta Wandel
Thomas Böhmer
Margaretha Haugen
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2014 Jun;74(4):322-8
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abscess - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug users
Female
Fruit
Humans
Hyperhomocysteinemia - epidemiology
Male
Malnutrition - complications - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Nutritional Status
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - epidemiology - etiology
Thinness
Vegetables
Vitamins - pharmacology
Young Adult
Abstract
Injection drug use and malnutrition are widespread among polydrug addicts in Oslo, Norway, but little is known about the frequency of abscess infections and possible relations to malnutrition.
To assess the prevalence of abscess infections, and differences in nutritional status between drug addicts with or without abscess infections.
A cross-sectional study of 195 polydrug addicts encompassing interview of demographics, dietary recall, anthropometric measurements and biochemical analyses. All respondents were under the influence of illicit drugs and were not participating in any drug treatment or rehabilitation program at the time of investigation.
Abscess infections were reported by 25% of the respondents, 19% of the men and 33% of the women (p = 0.025). Underweight (BMI 15 ?mol/L) was 73% in the abscess-infected group and 41% in the non-abscess-infected group (p = 0.001). The concentrations of S-25-hydroxy-vitamin D3 was very low.
The prevalence of abscess infections was 25% among the examined polydrug addicts. Dietary, anthropometric and biochemical assessment indicated a relation between abscess infections and malnutrition.
PubMed ID
24628456 View in PubMed
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Adipose tissue resistin levels in patients with anorexia nervosa.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81199
Source
Nutrition. 2006 Oct;22(10):977-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Dostalova Ivana
Kunesova Marie
Duskova Jaroslava
Papezova Hana
Nedvidkova Jara
Author Affiliation
Institute of Endocrinology, Laboratory of Clinical and Experimental Neuroendocrinology, Prague, Czech Republic. idostalova@endo.cz
Source
Nutrition. 2006 Oct;22(10):977-83
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - secretion
Adult
Anorexia Nervosa - blood - metabolism
Body Composition - physiology
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Leptin - blood
Malnutrition - metabolism - physiopathology
Microdialysis - methods
Resistin - metabolism
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Resistin is a specific fat-derived hormone that affects fuel homeostasis and insulin action in rodents. However, its role in human physiology and pathophysiologic conditions, such as malnutrition, remains uncertain. METHODS: To enhance understanding of the role of resistin in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa (AN), we measured plasma resistin levels in 13 women with a restrictive type of AN and in 16 healthy age-matched women (control). Further, we measured resistin levels in the subcutaneous adipose tissue of eight women from the AN group and eight women from the control group with an in vivo microdialysis technique (CMA/107 pump, CMA/60 catheters, CMA Microdialysis AB, Solna, Sweden). RESULTS: Body mass index, percentage of body fat, fasting plasma leptin and insulin, and homeostasis model assessment index for insulin resistance were severely decreased in patients with AN compared with the control group. Plasma resistin levels were significantly decreased in patients with AN (P
PubMed ID
16889937 View in PubMed
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[Alimentary risk factors of osteoporosis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151672
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2009;78(1):22-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
V M Kodentsova
O A Vrzhesinskaia
A A Svetikova
B S Kaganov
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2009;78(1):22-32
Date
2009
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Bone Density - genetics - physiology
Calcium - administration & dosage
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications
Food - standards
Gastrointestinal Diseases - complications
Humans
Malnutrition - complications
Motor Activity - physiology
Osteoporosis - etiology - genetics - metabolism
Risk factors
Russia
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
The data on of alimentary risk factors of osteoporosis have been observed. The frequency of decreased bone mineral density, vitamin and calcium diet content and sufficiency with vitamins evaluated by means of blood serum level determination among patients suffering from chronic diseases (of cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal tract, osteopenia and osteoporosis).
PubMed ID
19348280 View in PubMed
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Alzheimer's Disease in the Danish Malnutrition Period 1999-2007.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275026
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;48(4):979-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Maja Sparre-Sørensen
Gustav Kristensen
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;48(4):979-85
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - mortality
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Malnutrition - mortality
Middle Aged
Registries
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
Several studies published over the last few years have shown that malnutrition is a risk factor for developing and worsening Alzheimer's disease (AD) and that a balanced diet can delay the onset of the disease. During the period from January 1999 to January 2007, a statistically significant increase in the number of deaths related to malnutrition was found among the elderly in Denmark. Many more may have been suffering from malnutrition, but not to such a degree that it led to their deaths.
The aim of this study is to examine whether or not the effect of the malnutrition period can be seen in the number of AD-related deaths.
All Danes listed in the National Death Register from 1994 to 2012 where included in this study. Regression analyses based on the Expansion Method were used.
We found a sudden statistically significant rise in the number of deaths from AD associated with the period when the general nutritional state among the elderly in Denmark worsened (from 1999 to 2007).
The study concludes that the malnutrition period resulted in an excess death rate from Alzheimer's disease. All in all, a total of 345 extra lives were lost, and many might have developed AD earlier than they otherwise would, due to malnutrition.
PubMed ID
26444789 View in PubMed
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Assessment and documentation of patients' nutritional status: perceptions of registered nurses and their chief nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93100
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Aug;17(16):2125-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Persenius Mona Wentzel
Hall-Lord Marie-Louise
Bååth Carina
Larsson Bodil Wilde
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden. mona.persenius@kau.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Aug;17(16):2125-36
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chi-Square Distribution
Documentation - standards
Guideline Adherence - standards
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Logistic Models
Malnutrition - diagnosis - epidemiology
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Models, Nursing
Nurse Administrators - psychology
Nurse's Role
Nursing Assessment - standards
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Records - standards
Nursing Staff - education - organization & administration - psychology
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritional Status
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
AIMS: To study, within municipal care and county council care, (1) chief nurses' and registered nurses' perceptions of patient nutritional status assessment and nutritional assessment/screening tools, (2) registered nurses' perceptions of documentation in relation to nutrition and advantages and disadvantages with a documentation model. BACKGROUND: Chief nurses and registered nurses have a responsibility to identify malnourished patients and those at risk of malnutrition. DESIGN AND METHODS: In this descriptive study, 15 chief nurses in municipal care and 27 chief nurses in county council care were interviewed by telephone via a semi-structured interview guide. One hundred and thirty-one registered nurses (response rate 72%) from 14 municipalities and 28 hospital wards responded to the questionnaire, all in one county. RESULTS: According to the majority of chief nurses and registered nurses, only certain patients were assessed, on admission and/or during the stay. Nutritional assessment/screening tools and nutritional guidelines were seldom used. Most of the registered nurses documented nausea/vomiting, ability to eat and drink, diarrhoea and difficulties in chewing and swallowing, while energy intake and body mass index were rarely documented. However, the majority documented their judgement about the patient's nutritional condition. The registered nurses perceived the VIPS model (Swedish nursing documentation model) as a guideline as well as a model obstructing the information exchange. Differences were found between nurses (chief nurses/registered nurses) in municipal care and county council care, but not between registered nurses and their chief nurses. CONCLUSIONS: All patients are not nutritionally assessed and important nutritional parameters are not documented. Nutritionally compromised patients may remain unidentified and not properly cared for. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Assessment and documentation of the patients' nutritional status should be routinely performed in a more structured way in both municipal care and county council care. There is a need for increased nutritional nursing knowledge.
PubMed ID
18510576 View in PubMed
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Assessment of the nutritional status among residents in a Danish nursing home - health effects of a formulated food and meal policy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92407
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Sep;17(17):2288-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Kuosma Kirsi
Hjerrild Joan
Pedersen Preben Ulrich
Hundrup Yrsa Andersen
Author Affiliation
OK-Hjemmet Lotte, Kochsvej 30, DK-1812, Frederiksberg, Denmark. kirsi.kuosma@mail.dk
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Sep;17(17):2288-93
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry
Body Weight
Denmark
Female
Food, Fortified
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Malnutrition - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Nursing Homes
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritional Status
Organizational Policy
Abstract
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To gain information about the effects of implementation of a written food and meal policy and to evaluate to what extent systematic nutritional assessment and intervention would result in weight stability among the residents. BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that aged residents living in institutions suffer from malnutrition or are at risk of malnutrition. Health policies have pointed out that more attention should be given to individualised nutritional care. Several techniques are available to identify malnourished nursing home residents, but very few studies have reported findings of studies based on systematic nutritional assessment. DESIGN AND METHODS: A quasi-experimental study based on a time series design used the residents as their own controls. The study included all 20 residents who resided at the nursing home at baseline in September 2004. Five residents died during the study period (mean age 84.4 years, range 62-91 years). Altogether 15 residents (75%) were assessed all five times during the study period. RESULTS: The proportion of weight-stable residents increased significantly over the study from 52.6% (CI 99%: 23.1-80.2) at baseline to 87.7% (p
PubMed ID
18717007 View in PubMed
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Association of polypharmacy with nutritional status, functional ability and cognitive capacity over a three-year period in an elderly population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137164
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2011 May;20(5):514-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Johanna Jyrkkä
Hannes Enlund
Piia Lavikainen
Raimo Sulkava
Sirpa Hartikainen
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. johanna.jyrkka@uef.fi
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2011 May;20(5):514-22
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition - physiology
Cohort Studies
Drug Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Malnutrition - epidemiology
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritional Status - physiology
Polypharmacy
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To determine the association of polypharmacy with nutritional status, functional ability and cognitive capacity among elderly persons.
This was a prospective cohort study of 294 survivors from the population-based Geriatric Multidisciplinary Strategy for the Good Care of the Elderly (GeMS) Study, with yearly follow-ups during 2004 to 2007. Participants were the citizens of Kuopio, Finland, aged 75 years and older at baseline. Polypharmacy status was categorized as non-polypharmacy (0-5 drugs), polypharmacy (6-9 drugs) and excessive polypharmacy (10+ drugs). A linear mixed model approach was used for analysis the impact of polypharmacy on short form of mini nutritional assessment (MNA-SF), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and mini-mental status examination (MMSE) scores.
Excessive polypharmacy was associated with declined nutritional status (p?=?0.001), functional ability (p?
PubMed ID
21308855 View in PubMed
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Barriers to nutritional care for the undernourished hospitalised elderly: perspectives of nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268974
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2015 Mar;24(5-6):696-706
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Helene Dahl Eide
Kristin Halvorsen
Kari Almendingen
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2015 Mar;24(5-6):696-706
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility
Hospitalization
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Malnutrition - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Middle Aged
Norway
Nursing Staff, Hospital
Nutritional Support
Young Adult
Abstract
To identify what nurses experience as barriers to ensuring adequate nutritional care for the undernourished hospitalized elderly.
Undernutrition occurs frequently among the hospitalised elderly and can result in a variety of negative consequences if not treated. Nevertheless, undernutrition is often unrecognised and undertreated. Nurses have a great responsibility for nutritional care, as this is part of the patient's basic needs. Exploring nurses' experiences of preventing and treating undernourishment among older patients in hospitals is therefore highly relevant.
A focus group study was employed based on a hermeneutic phenomenological methodological approach.
Four focus group interviews with totally 16 nurses working in one large university hospital in Norway were conducted in spring 2012. The nurses were recruited from seven somatic wards, all with a high proportion of older (=70 years) inpatients. The data were analysed in the three interpretative contexts: self-understanding, a critical common-sense understanding and a theoretical understanding.
We identified five themes that reflect barriers the nurses experience in relation to ensuring adequate nutritional care for the undernourished elderly: loneliness in nutritional care, a need for competence in nutritional care, low flexibility in food service practices, system failure in nutritional care and nutritional care is being ignored.
The results imply that nutritional care at the university hospital has its limits within the hospital structure and organisation, but also regarding the nurses' competence. Moreover, the barriers revealed that the undernourished elderly are not identified and treated properly as stipulated in the recommendations in the national guidelines on the prevention and treatment of undernutrition.
The barriers revealed in this study are valuable when considering improvements to nutritional care practices on hospital wards to enable undernourished older inpatients to be identified and treated properly.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24646060 View in PubMed
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Source
Alaska Today. 12:28-29.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984-85
Author
Wells, V.
Source
Alaska Today. 12:28-29.
Date
1984-85
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Barrow
Frozen body
Trauma
Anthracosis
Pneumonia
Pleurisy
Trichinosis
Blood poisoning
Malnutrition
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 218.
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Body composition prediction equations based on deuterium oxide dilution method in Mexican children: a national study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122531
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2012 Oct;66(10):1099-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
E. Ramírez
M E Valencia
H. Bourges
T. Espinosa
S Y Moya-Camarena
G. Salazar
H. Alemán-Mateo
Author Affiliation
Laboratorio de Composición Corporal y Gasto Energético, Centro de Investigación en Nutrición y Salud Pública, Facultad de Salud Pública y Nutrición, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Nuevo León, México.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2012 Oct;66(10):1099-103
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Body Composition
Child
Child Development
Cross-Sectional Studies
Deuterium Oxide - metabolism
Electric Impedance
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Indians, North American
Indicator Dilution Techniques
Male
Malnutrition - epidemiology - ethnology
Mexico - epidemiology
Models, Biological
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology
Prevalence
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
Obesity and undernutrition co-exist in many regions of Mexico. However, accurate assessments are difficult because epidemiological data on body composition are not available. The aim of this study was to facilitate assessments of body composition in Mexican school children of different geographical regions and ethnicity by developing equations for bioelectrical impedance and anthropometry based on deuterium oxide dilution.
We evaluated 336 subjects (143 belonged to six major indigenous groups) from Northern, Central and Southern Mexico. We measured height (Ht), weight (Wt), tricipital skinfold (Tricp-SKF) and resistance (R) based on a bioimpedance analysis (BIA). Fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass (FM) were estimated from measurements of total body water with the deuterium dilution technique.
The final BIA equation was FFM (kg)=0.661 × Ht²/R+0.200 × Wt-0.320. The R² was 0.96; the square root of the mean square error (SRMSE) was 1.39?kg. The final anthropometric equation was FM (kg)=-1.067 × sex+0.458 × Tricp-SKF+0.263 × Wt-5.407. The R² was 0.91; SRMSE was 1.60?kg. The BIA equation had a bias of 0.095?kg and precision of 1.43?kg. The anthropometric equation had a bias of 0.047?kg and precision of 1.58?kg.
We validated two equations for evaluating body composition in Mexican indigenous and non-indigenous children and youth from three main regions of the country. These equations provided reliable estimates and will promote a better understanding of both obesity and undernutrition.
PubMed ID
22805494 View in PubMed
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225 records – page 1 of 23.