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34 records – page 1 of 4.

[Clinico-epidemiological analysis of imported malaria in Donetsk region (1979-1997)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33501
Source
Ter Arkh. 1998;70(11):43-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
V A Tuinov
S V Tuinov
T M Davydovskaia
Source
Ter Arkh. 1998;70(11):43-5
Date
1998
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Comparative Study
Disease Outbreaks
Disease Transmission, Horizontal
Emigration and Immigration
English Abstract
Humans
Malaria - diagnosis - epidemiology - transmission
Male
Retrospective Studies
Travel
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
AIM: The study of possibility of reappearance of malaria foci in the Donets region. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 322 cases of imported malaria (IM) in the Donets region registered in 1979-1997 have been analysed clinically and epidemiologically. Malaria was diagnosed in immigrants from and visitors to Africa, Asia and Latin America, malaria-endemic Azerbaidjan, Tadzhikistan, Afghanistan. RESULTS: Late diagnosis of malaria occurred in immigrants and businessmen who got infected during their business trips. Causative agents of malaria imported from Azerbaijan and Asia were resistant to chemoprophylaxis with delagil and primaxine. Clinical forms of IM are described. CONCLUSION: There is a real danger of malaria reappearance in the Donetsk region as the residents are at risk of being infected from late-diagnosis foreign tourists, immigrants, refugees.
PubMed ID
9949459 View in PubMed
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The cost-effectiveness of screening blood donors for malaria by PCR.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181545
Source
Transfusion. 2004 Feb;44(2):217-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Nadine Shehata
Michele Kohli
Allan Detsky
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Management, Policy and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. nadine.shehata@bloodservices.ca
Source
Transfusion. 2004 Feb;44(2):217-28
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Banks - economics
Blood Donors
Canada
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Genetic Testing - economics
Humans
Malaria - diagnosis - economics
Polymerase Chain Reaction - economics
Questionnaires - economics
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
The cost-effectiveness of four blood donor screening strategies for malaria was estimated to determine whether transmission by transfusion can be reduced.
A decision analysis model was developed to compare 1) not screening allogeneic blood donors for malaria (Strategy 1); 2) using the standard questionnaire (Strategy 2); 3) using the standard questionnaire followed by testing blood donors with risk factors for malaria with PCR (Strategy 3); and 4) screening all blood donors using PCR (Strategy 4). The expected costs and the number of cases of malaria for each strategy were compared and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated as the cost per case of malaria averted. All costs are in Canadian dollars.
Strategies 2 and 3 had the same effectiveness but different costs, with Strategy 3 being less costly. Compared to Strategy 1, the incremental cost effectiveness ratio was 6463 dollars per case of malaria averted for Strategy 3. Strategy 4 resulted in less transmission of malaria (0.4/million donors), but the cost compared to Strategy 3 was 3,972,624 dollars per case of malaria averted.
The addition of PCR to the standard screening questionnaire is economically attractive compared to the current standard screening questionnaire.
PubMed ID
14962313 View in PubMed
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[Detection of Plasmodium ovale in Moscow in a patient infected in Melanesia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254798
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1973 Mar-Apr;42(2):182-5
Publication Type
Article

Evaluation of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria in Swedish travellers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138116
Source
APMIS. 2011 Feb;119(2):88-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Ulf Bronner
Lillemor Karlsson
Birgitta Evengård
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Ulf.Bronner@karolinska.se
Source
APMIS. 2011 Feb;119(2):88-92
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Diagnostic Tests, Routine
False Negative Reactions
Female
Humans
Infant
L-Lactate Dehydrogenase - blood
Malaria - diagnosis
Male
Microscopy
Middle Aged
Parasitemia - diagnosis
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Travel
Abstract
Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malaria have become valuable tools for the diagnosis of malaria in both endemic and non-endemic areas. During a 7-year period, first the MalaQuick rapid test and then the NOW Malaria test, were evaluated by well-trained laboratory technicians in a university hospital laboratory of parasitology. A total of 635 blood samples were selected from 4731 blood specimens obtained from travellers at the emergency department, at wards and at out-patient clinics. The samples were analysed by microscopy and RDT. Malaria parasites were detected in the blood films of 134 (21%) samples. The sensitivity of the RDT for Plasmodium falciparum was 97.7% (84 of 86 samples) with a negative predictive value of 99.6%. The two false-negative results were associated with low levels of parasitaemia. For non-falciparum species the sensitivity was only 58.3% (28 of 48 samples). Based on the excellent ability of the RDTs to detect P. falciparum infections, we recommend the use of the NOW Malaria test as a complement to microscopy in the laboratory.
PubMed ID
21208275 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Nouv Presse Med. 1980 Mar 12;9(17):1241-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-12-1980
Author
C. Morin
P. Dubois
M. Demas
K. Lahsinat
M. Hayet
A. Vivier
Source
Nouv Presse Med. 1980 Mar 12;9(17):1241-2
Date
Mar-12-1980
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Female
Humans
Malaria - diagnosis
PubMed ID
7454559 View in PubMed
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Laboratory indicators of the diagnosis and course of imported malaria.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162282
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2007;39(8):707-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Ida E Gjørup
Lasse S Vestergaard
Kirsten Møller
Anita M Rønn
Ib C Bygbjerg
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases M, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark. idgj@herlevhosp.kbhamt.dk
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2007;39(8):707-13
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Antimalarials - therapeutic use
Blood Cell Count
Blood Platelets
Denmark
Female
Humans
Malaria - diagnosis - physiopathology
Male
Microscopy
Middle Aged
Parasitemia - blood - physiopathology
Prospective Studies
Travel
Abstract
When travellers return from malaria-endemic areas and present to hospital with fever, microscopy of blood smears remains the leading method to verify a suspected diagnosis of malaria. Additional laboratory abnormalities may, however, also be indicative of acute malaria infection. We monitored prospectively a group of patients with imported Plasmodium falciparum (n=28) or P. vivax/P. ovale (n=12) infection, respectively, and assessed haemoglobin, leucocytes, thrombocytes, C-reactive protein, coagulation factor II-VII-X, lactate dehydrogenase and bilirubin during 7 d of admission and weekly until d 28. For comparison, admission values of a group of febrile patients with suspected malaria, but with negative blood slides, were also assessed (n=66). The thrombocyte, leucocyte counts and coagulation factor II-VII-X were significantly lower in the malaria group compared to the non-malaria group, whereas the C-reactive protein, lactate dehydrogenase and bilirubin were significantly higher in the malaria group. The differences were particularly strong with falciparum malaria. By contrast, haemoglobin levels were not affected. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the role of a few commonly analysed laboratory parameters, in particular thrombocyte counts, in guiding the clinician managing a returning traveller with fever.
Notes
Comment In: Scand J Infect Dis. 2008;40(4):350-118365921
PubMed ID
17654348 View in PubMed
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34 records – page 1 of 4.