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Acrylamide-asparagine relationship in baked/toasted wheat and rye breads.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156290
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2008 Aug;25(8):921-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Kit Granby
Nikoline Juul Nielsen
Rikke V Hedegaard
Tue Christensen
Mette Kann
Leif H Skibsted
Author Affiliation
Technical University of Denmark, National food Institute, Søborg, DK-2860, Denmark. kgr@food.dtu.dk
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2008 Aug;25(8):921-9
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - analysis
Asparagine - analysis
Bread - analysis
Carcinogens - analysis
Cooking - methods
Denmark
Diet
Flour
Food Technology - methods
Hot Temperature
Humans
Maillard Reaction
Risk Assessment - methods
Secale cereale
Triticum
Abstract
Acrylamide in baked and toasted wheat and rye bread was studied in relation to levels of asparagine in flour, dough, bread and toasts. Asparagine was consumed during bread preparation resulting in reduced acrylamide content in the products. In wheat bread, 12% of the asparagine initially present in the flour (0.14 g kg(-1)) remained after yeast fermentation and baking; for rye bread, 82% of asparagine remained after sourdough fermentation and baking. Asparagine present in untoasted wheat bread had totally reacted after hard toasting. Toasted wheat and rye bread slices contained 11-161 and 27-205 microg kg(-1) acrylamide, respectively, compared to untoasted wheat and rye bread with
PubMed ID
18608496 View in PubMed
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Sensory quality and appropriateness of raw and boiled Jerusalem artichoke tubers (Helianthus tuberosus L.).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120501
Source
J Sci Food Agric. 2013 Mar 30;93(5):1211-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-30-2013
Author
Vibe Bach
Ulla Kidmose
Anette K Thybo
Merete Edelenbos
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Aarhus University, Kirstinebjergvej 10, DK-5792 Aarslev, Denmark.
Source
J Sci Food Agric. 2013 Mar 30;93(5):1211-8
Date
Mar-30-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Satisfaction
Cooking
Denmark
Dietary Carbohydrates - analysis
Female
Food Preferences
Food Quality
Helianthus - chemistry - growth & development
Humans
Maillard Reaction
Male
Mechanical Phenomena
Odors
Physicochemical Phenomena
Pigmentation
Plant Tubers - chemistry - growth & development
Regression Analysis
Sensation
Species Specificity
Taste
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate the sensory attributes, dry matter and sugar content of five varieties of Jerusalem artichoke tubers and their relation to the appropriateness of the tubers for raw and boiled preparation.
Sensory evaluation of raw and boiled Jerusalem artichoke tubers was performed by a trained sensory panel and a semi-trained consumer panel of 49 participants, who also evaluated the appropriateness of the tubers for raw and boiled preparation. The appropriateness of raw Jerusalem artichoke tubers was related to Jerusalem artichoke flavour, green nut flavour, sweetness and colour intensity, whereas the appropriateness of boiled tubers was related to celeriac aroma, sweet aroma, sweetness and colour intensity. In both preparations the variety Dwarf stood out from the others by being the least appropriate tuber.
A few sensory attributes can be used as predictors of the appropriateness of Jerusalem artichoke tubers for raw and boiled consumption. Knowledge on the quality of raw and boiled Jerusalem artichoke tubers can be used to inform consumers on the right choice of raw material and thereby increase the consumption of the vegetable.
PubMed ID
22996585 View in PubMed
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Some analytical factors affecting measured levels of acrylamide in food products.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82845
Source
Adv Exp Med Biol. 2005;561:285-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Eriksson Sune
Karlsson Patrik
Author Affiliation
AnalyCen Nordic AB, Box 905, S-53119 Lidköping, Sweden. sune.eriksson@analycen.se
Source
Adv Exp Med Biol. 2005;561:285-91
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - analysis - chemistry
Acrylamides - analysis
Cookery
Food
Food Analysis - methods
Food Contamination
Food Handling
Food Industry
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Maillard Reaction
Models, Chemical
Risk
Risk assessment
Solanum tuberosum
Time Factors
Water - chemistry
Abstract
Acrylamide in food is normally measured as "free water-soluble acrylamide". However, it is shown that certain extraction techniques, like extraction as for dietary fibre or at high pH can affect the result. This has to be accounted for, particularly in exposure assessment and in studies of bioavailability and, in the long run, the health risk assessment.
PubMed ID
16438305 View in PubMed
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