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1H MRS studies in the Finnish boron neutron capture therapy project: detection of 10B-carrier, L-p-boronophenylalanine-fructose.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172386
Source
Eur J Radiol. 2005 Nov;56(2):154-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
M. Timonen
L. Kankaanranta
N. Lundbom
J. Collan
A. Kangasmäki
M. Kortesniemi
A-M Häkkinen
A. Lönngren
S. Karjalainen
M. Rasilainen
J. Leinonen
T. Huitti
J. Jääskeläinen
M. Kouri
S. Savolainen
S. Heikkinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki, POB 64, FIN-00014, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur J Radiol. 2005 Nov;56(2):154-9
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Boron - therapeutic use
Boron Compounds - analysis - blood
Boron Neutron Capture Therapy
Brain Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy
Carcinoma - pathology - radiotherapy
Female
Finland
Fructose - analogs & derivatives - analysis - blood
Glioblastoma - pathology - radiotherapy
Humans
Hydrogen
Isotopes - therapeutic use
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy - methods
Male
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - pathology - radiotherapy
Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy
Phantoms, Imaging
Plasma
Radiopharmaceuticals - therapeutic use
Abstract
This article summarizes the current status of 1H MRS in detecting and quantifying a boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) boron carrier, L-p-boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-F) in vivo in the Finnish BNCT project. The applicability of 1H MRS to detect BPA-F is evaluated and discussed in a typical situation with a blood containing resection cavity within the gross tumour volume (GTV). 1H MRS is not an ideal method to study BPA concentration in GTV with blood in recent resection cavity. For an optimal identification of BPA signals in the in vivo 1H MR spectrum, both pre- and post-infusion 1H MRS should be performed. The post-infusion spectroscopy studies should be scheduled either prior to or, less optimally, immediately after the BNCT. The pre-BNCT MRS is necessary in order to utilise the MRS results in the actual dose planning.
PubMed ID
16233888 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of quantitative magnetic resonance and eight-electrode bioelectrical impedance analysis in normal weight and obese women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258595
Source
Clin Nutr. 2014 Jun;33(3):471-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Marja Bosaeus
Therese Karlsson
Agneta Holmäng
Lars Ellegård
Source
Clin Nutr. 2014 Jun;33(3):471-7
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Composition
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cross-Sectional Studies
Electric Impedance
Electrodes
Female
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy - methods
Middle Aged
Obesity - diagnosis
Plethysmography - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) has previously been shown to both overestimate and underestimate average fat mass (FM) in humans. Eight-electrode bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) has previously been found biased as well as successfully validated. We report cross-sectional accuracy of QMR and eight-electrode BIA evaluated with air displacement plethysmography (ADP) as reference method.
Fat mass and fat free mass (FFM) by QMR and eight-electrode BIA were evaluated against ADP as reference in 38 normal weight and 30 obese women. Total body water estimates by QMR and eight-electrode BIA were compared.
Fat mass was overestimated by QMR (1 ± 2 kg, p
PubMed ID
23871192 View in PubMed
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Anti-Bacterial Effect and Cytotoxicity Assessment of Lipid 430 Isolated from Algibacter sp.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308301
Source
Molecules. 2019 Nov 05; 24(21):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-05-2019
Author
Yannik K-H Schneider
Kine Ø Hansen
Johan Isaksson
Sara Ullsten
Espen H Hansen
Jeanette Hammer Andersen
Author Affiliation
Marbio, Faculty for Fisheries, Biosciences and Economy, UiT-The Arctic University of Norway, Breivika, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Molecules. 2019 Nov 05; 24(21):
Date
Nov-05-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - chemistry - pharmacology
Cell Line, Tumor
Cytotoxins - chemistry - pharmacology
Flavobacteriaceae - chemistry
HT29 Cells
Humans
Lipids - chemistry - pharmacology
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy - methods
Mass Spectrometry - methods
Melanoma - drug therapy
Streptococcus agalactiae - drug effects
Abstract
Two bacterial isolates from the Barents Sea, both belonging to the genus Algibacter, were found to yield extracts with anti-bacterial bioactivity. Mass spectrometry guided dereplication and purification of the active extracts lead to the isolation of the same active principle in both extracts. The structure of the bioactive compound was identified via mass spectrometry and nuclear resonance spectroscopy and it turned out to be the known lipopeptide Lipid 430. We discovered and determined its previously unknown anti-bacterial activity against Streptococcus agalactiae and revealed a cytotoxic effect against the A2058 human melanoma cell line at significantly lower concentrations compared to its anti-bacterial concentration. Flow cytometry and microscopy investigations of the cytotoxicity against the melanoma cell line indicated that Lipid 430 did not cause immediate cell lysis. The experiments with melanoma cells suggest that the compound functions trough more complex pathways than acting as a simple detergent.
PubMed ID
31694159 View in PubMed
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A differential network approach to exploring differences between biological states: an application to prediabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130667
Source
PLoS One. 2011;6(9):e24702
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Beatriz Valcárcel
Peter Würtz
Nafisa-Katrin Seich al Basatena
Taru Tukiainen
Antti J Kangas
Pasi Soininen
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Mika Ala-Korpela
Timothy M Ebbels
Maria de Iorio
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
Source
PLoS One. 2011;6(9):e24702
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Glucose - chemistry
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - metabolism
Dyslipidemias - genetics
Female
Finland
Gene Regulatory Networks
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Genetic Variation
Humans
Lipoproteins - chemistry
Lipoproteins, HDL - chemistry
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy - methods
Male
Models, Biological
Models, Genetic
Models, Statistical
Phenotype
Systems Biology
Abstract
Variations in the pattern of molecular associations are observed during disease development. The comprehensive analysis of molecular association patterns and their changes in relation to different physiological conditions can yield insight into the biological basis of disease-specific phenotype variation.
Here, we introduce a formal statistical method for the differential analysis of molecular associations via network representation. We illustrate our approach with extensive data on lipoprotein subclasses measured by NMR spectroscopy in 4,406 individuals with normal fasting glucose, and 531 subjects with impaired fasting glucose (prediabetes). We estimate the pair-wise association between measures using shrinkage estimates of partial correlations and build the differential network based on this measure of association. We explore the topological properties of the inferred network to gain insight into important metabolic differences between individuals with normal fasting glucose and prediabetes.
Differential networks provide new insights characterizing differences in biological states. Based on conventional statistical methods, few differences in concentration levels of lipoprotein subclasses were found between individuals with normal fasting glucose and individuals with prediabetes. By performing the differential analysis of networks, several characteristic changes in lipoprotein metabolism known to be related to diabetic dyslipidemias were identified. The results demonstrate the applicability of the new approach to identify key molecular changes inaccessible to standard approaches.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21980352 View in PubMed
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High-resolution screening combined with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR for identification of potential health-promoting constituents in sea aster and searocket--new Nordic food ingredients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107924
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2013 Sep 11;61(36):8616-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-11-2013
Author
Sileshi G Wubshet
Jeppe S Schmidt
Stefanie Wiese
Dan Staerk
Author Affiliation
Department of Drug Design and Pharmacology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen , Universitetsparken 2, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2013 Sep 11;61(36):8616-23
Date
Sep-11-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antioxidants - analysis
Aster Plant - chemistry
Brassicaceae - chemistry
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid - methods
Diet
Flavonoids - analysis
Free Radical Scavengers - analysis
Health promotion
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy - methods
Mass Spectrometry
Norway
Solid Phase Extraction - methods
Abstract
Sea aster (Aster tripolium L.) and searocket (Cakile maritima Scop.), potential ingredients in the New Nordic Diet, were analyzed by high-resolution radical scavenging and high-resolution a-glucosidase inhibition assays. Results from the two bioactivity profiles were used to guide subsequent structural analysis toward constituents with potential health-promoting effects. Structural analysis was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction and automated tube transfer nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, that is, HPLC-HRMS-SPE-ttNMR. High-resolution mass spectrometry together with detailed analysis of one- and two-dimensional proton detected NMR experiments enabled unambiguous assignment of the targeted analytes. This revealed a series of caffeoyl esters (1, 2, 5), flavonoid glycosides (3, 4, 6, 11-15), flavonoids (7-9), sinapate esters (10, 16, 17), and sinapinic acid (18) associated with radical scavenging and/or a-glucosidase inhibition. In vitro assays implemented in this study showed that sea aster holds potential as a future functional food ingredient for lowering postprandial blood glucose level for diabetics, but further investigations are needed to prove the effect in vivo.
PubMed ID
23962163 View in PubMed
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Metabolomic Profiling of Statin Use and Genetic Inhibition of HMG-CoA Reductase.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274947
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2016 Mar 15;67(10):1200-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2016
Author
Peter Würtz
Qin Wang
Pasi Soininen
Antti J Kangas
Ghazaleh Fatemifar
Tuulia Tynkkynen
Mika Tiainen
Markus Perola
Therese Tillin
Alun D Hughes
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Mika Kähönen
Terho Lehtimäki
Naveed Sattar
Aroon D Hingorani
Juan-Pablo Casas
Veikko Salomaa
Mika Kivimäki
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
George Davey Smith
Mauno Vanhala
Debbie A Lawlor
Olli T Raitakari
Nish Chaturvedi
Johannes Kettunen
Mika Ala-Korpela
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2016 Mar 15;67(10):1200-10
Date
Mar-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - genetics - prevention & control
Female
Finland
Forecasting
Great Britain
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA Reductases - blood - drug effects - genetics
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy - methods
Male
Mendelian Randomization Analysis - methods
Metabolomics - methods
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Statins are first-line therapy for cardiovascular disease prevention, but their systemic effects across lipoprotein subclasses, fatty acids, and circulating metabolites remain incompletely characterized.
This study sought to determine the molecular effects of statin therapy on multiple metabolic pathways.
Metabolic profiles based on serum nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics were quantified at 2 time points in 4 population-based cohorts from the United Kingdom and Finland (N = 5,590; 2.5 to 23.0 years of follow-up). Concentration changes in 80 lipid and metabolite measures during follow-up were compared between 716 individuals who started statin therapy and 4,874 persistent nonusers. To further understand the pharmacological effects of statins, we used Mendelian randomization to assess associations of a genetic variant known to mimic inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase (the intended drug target) with the same lipids and metabolites for 27,914 individuals from 8 population-based cohorts.
Starting statin therapy was associated with numerous lipoprotein and fatty acid changes, including substantial lowering of remnant cholesterol (80% relative to low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C]), but only modest lowering of triglycerides (25% relative to LDL-C). Among fatty acids, omega-6 levels decreased the most (68% relative to LDL-C); other fatty acids were only modestly affected. No robust changes were observed for circulating amino acids, ketones, or glycolysis-related metabolites. The intricate metabolic changes associated with statin use closely matched the association pattern with rs12916 in the HMGCR gene (R(2) = 0.94, slope 1.00 ? 0.03).
Statin use leads to extensive lipid changes beyond LDL-C and appears efficacious for lowering remnant cholesterol. Metabolomic profiling, however, suggested minimal effects on amino acids. The results exemplify how detailed metabolic characterization of genetic proxies for drug targets can inform indications, pleiotropic effects, and pharmacological mechanisms.
Notes
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Comment In: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2016 Mar 15;67(10):1211-326965543
PubMed ID
26965542 View in PubMed
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Metabonomics, dietary influences and cultural differences: a 1H NMR-based study of urine samples obtained from healthy British and Swedish subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177509
Source
J Pharm Biomed Anal. 2004 Nov 19;36(4):841-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-19-2004
Author
E M Lenz
J. Bright
I D Wilson
A. Hughes
J. Morrisson
H. Lindberg
A. Lockton
Author Affiliation
Department of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, Mereside, Alderley Park, Macclesfield SK10 4TG, UK. Eva.Lenz@astrazeneca.com
Source
J Pharm Biomed Anal. 2004 Nov 19;36(4):841-9
Date
Nov-19-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Feasibility Studies
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Great Britain - ethnology
Humans
Life Style - ethnology
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy - methods - standards
Male
Methylamines - urine
Middle Aged
Principal Component Analysis - methods
Protons
Sweden - ethnology
Urinalysis - methods
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and comparability of metabonomic data in clinical studies conducted in different countries without dietary restriction. A (1)H NMR-based metabonomic analysis was performed on urine samples obtained from two separate studies, both including male and female subjects. The first was on a group of healthy British subjects (n = 120), whilst the second was on healthy subjects from two European countries (Britain and Sweden, n = 30). The subjects were asked to provide single, early morning urine samples collected on a single occasion. The (1)H NMR spectra obtained for urine samples were visually inspected and analysed chemometrically using principal components analysis (PCA). These inspections highlighted outliers within the urine samples and displayed interesting differences, revealing characteristic dietary and cultural features between the subjects of both countries, such as high trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO)-excretion in the Swedish population and high taurine-excretion, due to the Atkins diet. This study suggests that the endogenous urinary profile is subject to distinct cultural and severe dietary influences and that great care needs to be taken in the interpretation of 'biomarkers of disease and response to drug therapy' for diagnostic purposes.
PubMed ID
15533678 View in PubMed
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MR spectroscopy of liver in overweight children and adolescents: investigation of ¹H T2 relaxation times at 3T.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136447
Source
Eur J Radiol. 2012 May;81(5):811-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Elizaveta Chabanova
Dorthe S Bille
Ebbe Thisted
Jens-Christian Holm
Henrik S Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, DK-2730 Herlev, Denmark. elcha@heh.regionh.dk
Source
Eur J Radiol. 2012 May;81(5):811-4
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adolescent
Algorithms
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy - methods - statistics & numerical data
Male
Overweight - epidemiology - physiopathology
Protons - diagnostic use
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
The objective was to investigate T(2) relaxation values and to optimize hepatic fat quantification using proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) at 3T in overweight and obese children and adolescents.
The study included 123 consecutive children and adolescents with a body mass index above the 97th percentile according to age and sex. (1)H MR spectroscopy was performed at 3.0 T using point resolved spectroscopy sequence with series TE. T(2) relaxation values and hepatic fat content corrected for the T(2) relaxation effects were calculated.
T(2) values for water ranged from 22 ms to 42 ms (mean value 28 ms) and T(2) values for fat ranged from 36 ms to 99 ms (mean value 64 ms). Poor correlation was observed: (1) between T(2) relaxation times of fat and T(2) relaxation times of water (correlation coefficient r=0.038, P=0.79); (2) between T(2) relaxation times of fat and fat content (r=0.057, P=0.69); (3) between T(2) relaxation times of water and fat content (r=0.160, P=0.26). Correlation between fat peak content and the T(2) corrected fat content decreased with increasing echo time TE: r=0.97 for TE=45, r=0.93 for TE=75, r=0.89 for TE=105, P
PubMed ID
21377308 View in PubMed
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A novel mutation of the GAA gene in a Finnish late-onset Pompe disease patient: clinical phenotype and follow-up with enzyme replacement therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150748
Source
Muscle Nerve. 2009 Jul;40(1):143-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Mari P Korpela
Anders Paetau
Mervi I Löfberg
Marjut H Timonen
Antti E Lamminen
Sari M K Kiuru-Enari
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, P.O. Box 340, Helsinki 00029, Finland. marinposti@hotmial.com
Source
Muscle Nerve. 2009 Jul;40(1):143-8
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
DNA Mutational Analysis
Electrocardiography
Electromyography - methods
Electrons - diagnostic use
Female
Finland - ethnology
Follow-Up Studies
Glycogen Storage Disease Type II - diagnosis - drug therapy - genetics - physiopathology
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy - methods
Muscle, Skeletal - pathology - physiopathology - radionuclide imaging
Mutation - genetics
Recombinant Proteins - therapeutic use
Tyrosine - genetics
Young Adult
alpha-Glucosidases - genetics - therapeutic use
Abstract
Pompe disease is a rare, progressive disease leading to skeletal muscle weakness due to deficiency of the acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) enzyme. Herein we report the first diagnosed Finnish patient with a phenotype compatible with the late-onset form of Pompe disease. Molecular genetic analysis of the GAA gene revealed a novel missense mutation, 1725C>A (Y575X), combined with a previously reported mutation, 1634C>T (P545L). Human recombinant alpha-glucosidase enzyme (alglucosidase-alpha) treatment was initiated for this patient at age 20 years. After 12 months she was no longer fully wheelchair-bound, and muscle strength had improved. No disease progression was visible on muscle magnetic resonance imaging of the lower limbs, and the energy state of the muscle cells increased by 46% on phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Overall, our findings suggest that enzyme replacement therapy is indicated, even in patients with late-onset Pompe disease, to halt disease progression and improve the quality of daily life.
PubMed ID
19472353 View in PubMed
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Quantification of deuterium isotopomers of tree-ring cellulose using nuclear magnetic resonance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95685
Source
Anal Chem. 2006 Dec 15;78(24):8406-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2006
Author
Betson Tatiana R
Augusti Angela
Schleucher Jürgen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Anal Chem. 2006 Dec 15;78(24):8406-11
Date
Dec-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cellulose - analysis - chemistry
Climate
Deuterium - chemistry
Ecosystem
Environmental monitoring
Glucose - analogs & derivatives - analysis
Isotope Labeling
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy - methods
Trees - chemistry - growth & development
Abstract
Stable isotopes in tree rings are important tools for reconstruction of past climate. Deuterium (D) is of particular interest since it may contain climate signals and report on tree physiology. Measurements of the D/H ratio of tree-ring cellulose have proven difficult to interpret, presumably because the D/H ratio of the whole molecule blends the abundances of the seven D isotopomers of cellulose. Here we present a method to measure the abundance of the D isotopomers of tree-ring cellulose by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). The method transforms tree-ring cellulose into a glucose derivative that gives highly resolved, quantifiable deuterium NMR spectra. General guidelines for measurement of D isotopomers by NMR are described. The transformation was optimized for yield and did not alter the original D isotopomer abundances, thus, conserving the original signals recorded in wood cellulose. In the tree-ring samples tested, the abundances of D isotopomers varied by approximately +/-10% (2% standard error). This large variability can only be caused by biochemistry processes and shows that more information is present in D isotopomer abundances, compared to the D/H ratio. Therefore, measurements of the D isotopomer distribution of tree rings may be used to obtain information on long-term adaptations to environmental changes and past climate change.
PubMed ID
17165833 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.