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1216 records – page 1 of 122.

3D modeling-based surgical planning in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery--preliminary results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90794
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2008 Sep;128(9):1011-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Raappana Antti
Koivukangas John
Pirilä Tapio
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. antti.raappana@oulu.fi
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2008 Sep;128(9):1011-8
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoma - pathology - radiography - surgery
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Endoscopy - methods
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Neurological
Pituitary Neoplasms - pathology - radiography - surgery
Prospective Studies
Surgery, Computer-Assisted - methods
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Young Adult
Abstract
CONCLUSION: The preoperative three-dimensional (3D) modeling of the pituitary adenoma together with pituitary gland, optic nerves, carotid arteries, and the sphenoid sinuses was adopted for routine use in our institution for all pituitary surgery patients. It gave the surgeon a more profound orientation to the individual surgical field compared with the use of conventional 2D images only. OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the feasibility of 3D surgical planning for pituitary adenoma surgery using readily available resources. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data of 40 consecutive patients with pituitary adenoma were used to construct 3D models to be used in preoperative planning and during the surgery. A freely available, open source program (3D Slicer) downloaded to a conventional personal computer (PC) was applied. RESULTS: The authors present a brief description of the 3D reconstruction-based surgical planning workflow. In addition to the preoperative planning the 3D model was used as a 'road map' during the operation. With the 3D model the surgeon was more confident when opening the sellar wall and when evacuating the tumor from areas in contact with vital structures than when using only conventional 2D images.
PubMed ID
19086197 View in PubMed
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3 Tesla MRI-detected brain lesions after pulmonary vein isolation for atrial fibrillation: results of the MACPAF study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121377
Source
J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 2013 Jan;24(1):14-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Karl Georg Haeusler
Lydia Koch
Juliane Herm
Ute A Kopp
Peter U Heuschmann
Matthias Endres
Heinz-Peter Schultheiss
Alexander Schirdewan
Jochen B Fiebach
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany. georg.haeusler@charite.de
Source
J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 2013 Jan;24(1):14-21
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Atrial Fibrillation - pathology - surgery
Brain Ischemia - etiology - pathology
Catheter Ablation - adverse effects
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - etiology
Female
Heart Conduction System - surgery
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Postoperative Complications - etiology - pathology
Pulmonary Veins - pathology - surgery
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Left atrial catheter ablation (LACA) is an established therapeutic approach to abolish symptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF).
Based on the prospective MACPAF study (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01061931) we report the rate of ischemic brain lesions postablation and their impact on cognitive function.
Patients with symptomatic paroxysmal AF were randomized to LACA using the Arctic Front® or the HD Mesh Ablator® catheter. All patients underwent brain MRI at 3 Tesla, neurological, and neuropsychological examinations within 48 hours prior and after the ablation procedure.
There was no clinically evident stroke in 37 patients (mean age 62.4 ± 8.4 years; 41% female; median CHADS2 score 1 [IQR 0-2]) after LACA but high-resolution diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) detected new ischemic lesions in 15 (41%) patients after LACA. Four (27%) of the HD Mesh Ablator® patients and 11 (50%) of the Arctic Front® patients suffered a silent ischemic lesion (P = 0.19). In these 15 patients, there was a nonsignificant trend toward lower cardiac ejection fraction (P = 0.07) and AF episodes during LACA (P = 0.09), while activated clotting time levels, number of energy applications, periprocedural electrocardioversion or CHADS(2) score had no impact. Lesion volumes varied from 5 to 150 mm(3) and 1 to 5 lesions were detected per patient. However, acute brain lesions had no effect on cognitive performance immediately after LACA. Of the DWI lesions postablation 82% were not detectable on FLAIR images 6-9 months postablation.
According to 3 Tesla high-resolution DWI, ischemic brain lesions after LACA were common but not associated with impaired cognitive function after the ablation procedure.
Notes
Comment In: J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 2013 Jan;24(1):22-323130591
PubMed ID
22913568 View in PubMed
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15q11.2 CNV affects cognitive, structural and functional correlates of dyslexia and dyscalculia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287813
Source
Transl Psychiatry. 2017 Apr 25;7(4):e1109
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-25-2017
Author
M O Ulfarsson
G B Walters
O. Gustafsson
S. Steinberg
A. Silva
O M Doyle
M. Brammer
D F Gudbjartsson
S. Arnarsdottir
G A Jonsdottir
R S Gisladottir
G. Bjornsdottir
H. Helgason
L M Ellingsen
J G Halldorsson
E. Saemundsen
B. Stefansdottir
L. Jonsson
V K Eiriksdottir
G R Eiriksdottir
G H Johannesdottir
U. Unnsteinsdottir
B. Jonsdottir
B B Magnusdottir
P. Sulem
U. Thorsteinsdottir
E. Sigurdsson
D. Brandeis
A. Meyer-Lindenberg
H. Stefansson
K. Stefansson
Source
Transl Psychiatry. 2017 Apr 25;7(4):e1109
Date
Apr-25-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Chromosome Aberrations
Chromosome Deletion
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 15 - genetics
Cognition - physiology
DNA Copy Number Variations - genetics
Developmental Disabilities - genetics
Dyscalculia - genetics
Dyslexia - genetics
Female
Functional Neuroimaging - methods - standards
Heterozygote
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Intellectual Disability - genetics
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests - standards
Phenotype
Temporal Lobe - anatomy & histology - diagnostic imaging
Young Adult
Abstract
Several copy number variants have been associated with neuropsychiatric disorders and these variants have been shown to also influence cognitive abilities in carriers unaffected by psychiatric disorders. Previously, we associated the 15q11.2(BP1-BP2) deletion with specific learning disabilities and a larger corpus callosum. Here we investigate, in a much larger sample, the effect of the 15q11.2(BP1-BP2) deletion on cognitive, structural and functional correlates of dyslexia and dyscalculia. We report that the deletion confers greatest risk of the combined phenotype of dyslexia and dyscalculia. We also show that the deletion associates with a smaller left fusiform gyrus. Moreover, tailored functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments using phonological lexical decision and multiplication verification tasks demonstrate altered activation in the left fusiform and the left angular gyri in carriers. Thus, by using convergent evidence from neuropsychological testing, and structural and functional neuroimaging, we show that the 15q11.2(BP1-BP2) deletion affects cognitive, structural and functional correlates of both dyslexia and dyscalculia.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28440815 View in PubMed
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250 microg or 500 microg interferon beta-1b versus 20 mg glatiramer acetate in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: a prospective, randomised, multicentre study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148735
Source
Lancet Neurol. 2009 Oct;8(10):889-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Paul O'Connor
Massimo Filippi
Barry Arnason
Giancarlo Comi
Stuart Cook
Douglas Goodin
Hans-Peter Hartung
Douglas Jeffery
Ludwig Kappos
Francis Boateng
Vitali Filippov
Maria Groth
Volker Knappertz
Christian Kraus
Rupert Sandbrink
Christoph Pohl
Timon Bogumil
P. O'Connor
M. Filippi
B. Arnason
S. Cook
D. Goodin
H-P Hartung
H-P Harung
L. Kappos
D. Jeffery
G. Comi
Author Affiliation
St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada. oconnorp@smh.toronto.on.ca
Source
Lancet Neurol. 2009 Oct;8(10):889-97
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Brain - drug effects - pathology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Immunologic Factors - therapeutic use
Interferon-beta - administration & dosage
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting - drug therapy - pathology
Peptides - therapeutic use
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the Betaferon Efficacy Yielding Outcomes of a New Dose (BEYOND) trial was to compare the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of 250 microg or 500 microg interferon beta-1b with glatiramer acetate for treating relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.
Between November, 2003, and June, 2005, 2447 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis were screened and 2244 patients were enrolled in this prospective, multicentre, randomised trial. Patients were randomly assigned 2:2:1 by block randomisation with regional stratification to receive one of two doses of interferon beta-1b (250 microg or 500 microg) subcutaneously every other day or 20 mg glatiramer acetate subcutaneously every day. The primary outcome was relapse risk, defined as new or recurrent neurological symptoms separated by at least 30 days from the preceding event and that lasted at least 24 h. Secondary outcomes were progression on the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) and change in T1-hypointense lesion volume. Clinical outcomes were assessed quarterly for 2.0-3.5 years; MRI was done at screening and annually thereafter. Analysis was by per protocol. This study is registered, number NCT00099502.
We found no differences in relapse risk, EDSS progression, T1-hypointense lesion volume, or normalised brain volume among treatment groups. Flu-like symptoms were more common in patients treated with interferon beta-1b (p
Notes
Comment In: Lancet Neurol. 2009 Dec;8(12):1085-6; author reply 1086-719909906
Comment In: Lancet Neurol. 2009 Oct;8(10):870-119729345
Erratum In: Lancet Neurol. 2012 Jan;11(1):27Cree, B [added]; Harung, H-P [corrected to Hartung, H-P]
Erratum In: Lancet Neurol. 2009 Nov;8(11):981
Erratum In: Lancet Neurol. 2011 Feb;10(2):115
PubMed ID
19729344 View in PubMed
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1991 Volvo Award in clinical sciences. Smoking and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration: an MRI study of identical twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65039
Source
Spine. 1991 Sep;16(9):1015-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1991
Author
M C Battié
T. Videman
K. Gill
G B Moneta
R. Nyman
J. Kaprio
M. Koskenvuo
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, University of Washington, Seattle.
Source
Spine. 1991 Sep;16(9):1015-21
Date
Sep-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Awards and Prizes
Comparative Study
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Intervertebral Disk Displacement - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Lumbar Vertebrae - pathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
The primary objective of this study was to determine whether disc degeneration, as assessed through magnetic resonance imaging, is greater in smokers than in nonsmokers. To control for the maximum number of potentially confounding variables, pairs of identical twins highly discordant for cigarette smoking were selected as study subjects. Data analyses revealed 18% greater mean disc degeneration scores in the lumbar spines of smokers as compared with nonsmokers. The effect was present across the entire lumbar spine, implicating a mechanism acting systemically. This investigation demonstrates the efficiency of using carefully selected controls in studying conditions of multifactorial etiology, such as disc degeneration.
PubMed ID
1948392 View in PubMed
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Aberrant functioning of the putamen links delusions, antipsychotic drug dose, and compromised connectivity in first episode psychosis--Preliminary fMRI findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270781
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2015 Aug 30;233(2):201-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-2015
Author
Tuukka T Raij
Teemu Mäntylä
Tuula Kieseppä
Jaana Suvisaari
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2015 Aug 30;233(2):201-11
Date
Aug-30-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Delusions - drug therapy - physiopathology
Female
Finland
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Nerve Net - drug effects - physiopathology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotic Disorders - drug therapy - physiopathology
Putamen - drug effects - physiopathology
Young Adult
Abstract
The dopamine theory proposes the relationship of delusions to aberrant signaling in striatal circuitries that can be normalized with dopamine D2 receptor-blocking drugs. Localization of such circuitries, as well as their upstream and downstream signaling, remains poorly known. We collected functional magnetic resonance images from first-episode psychosis patients and controls during an audiovisual movie. Final analyses included 20 patients and 20 controls; another sample of 10 patients and 10 controls was used to calculate a comparison signal-time course. We identified putamen circuitry in which the signal aberrance (poor correlation with the comparison signal time course) was predicted by the dopamine theory, being greater in patients than controls; correlating positively with delusion scores; and correlating negatively with antipsychotic-equivalent dosage. In Granger causality analysis, patients showed a compromised contribution of the cortical salience network to the putamen and compromised contribution of the putamen to the default mode network. Results were corrected for multiple comparisons at the cluster level with primary voxel-wise threshold p
PubMed ID
26184459 View in PubMed
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[ABOUT PROFESSIONAL TRAINING OF ROENTGENOLOGISTS FOR WORKING ON MAGNETIC RESONANCE TOMOGRAPHIC SCANNER].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267005
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2015 Mar-Apr;23(2):38-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
A V Korobov
A N Morozov
V G Pasechnaia
N V Fediainova
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2015 Mar-Apr;23(2):38-42
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Continuing - organization & administration
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Radiology - education
Russia
Abstract
The article considers main problems conditioned demand of development of model of professional training of roentgenologists for working on magnetic resonance tomographic scanner in conditions of non-public medical diagnostic center in accordance with the concept of continuous medical education. The developed model is presented in graphic form i.e. folded in the form of generic structure and unfolded in the form of algorithmic and structural models of separate blocks. The detailed description of components of model and their functional designation are presented.
PubMed ID
26399071 View in PubMed
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[A case of ticlopidine-associated thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: special emphasis on diffusion weighted MRI].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164975
Source
Rinsho Shinkeigaku. 2006 Oct;46(10):693-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Nozomu Matsuda
Akiko Yoshihara
Rie Nishikata
Toshie Matsuda
Kazuhiro Endo
Teiji Yamamoto
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurolgy, Fukushima Medical University.
Source
Rinsho Shinkeigaku. 2006 Oct;46(10):693-8
Date
Oct-2006
Language
Japanese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ADAM Proteins - metabolism
Aged
Brain - pathology - radionuclide imaging
Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Fibrinolytic Agents - adverse effects
Humans
Iofetamine - diagnostic use
Male
Plasma Exchange
Purpura, Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic - diagnosis - therapy
Ticlopidine - adverse effects
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon
Abstract
A 69-year-old man of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) associated with ticlopidine was reported. The patient initially complained of dysarthria and left hemiparesis one month after oral administration of ticlopidine. These motor symptoms were followed by gradual deline in level of consciousness. On admission, he was in apallic state with focal cerebral signs, accompanied by low-grade fever, and purpuric eruptions. Laboratory findings showed remarkable thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, and renal dysfunction. The patient received diagnosis of TTP based on Moschcowitzs criteria. Prompt initiation of plasma exchange dramatically improved the patient's clinical symptoms. In this case, decreased activities of a disintegrin and metallo proteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motifs 13 (ADAMTS13) in plasma and anti-ADAMTS13 IgG antibodies were detected. Serial diffusion weighted MRI with six-day interval starting from the onset showed two interesting findings. First, appearance and disappearance of scattered high intensity areas were observed in the cerebellum, corpus callosum, cerebral white matter, and neocortex. Second, these lesions roughly corresponded to border-zone infarct in distribution. Cranial MRI findings of TTP in the literature could be classified into the following four groups: 1) multiple infarction caused by microthrombi; 2) infarction caused by occulusion of an intracranial main artery; 3) reversible edema involving the cerebral white matter; and 4) unremarkable finding without specific abnormality. This case could be classified into the group 1. Based on the diffusion weighted MRI findings of this case, a previous pathological report and recent elucidations of clinical conditions, it is hypothesized that TTP is a predisposition for resembling the border-zone infarction in group 1. The border-zone distribution of transient high intensity areas in diffusion weighted MRI in this case could be explained by either high resistant vascules zone or impaired clearance of emboli, taking an autopsy case report into consideration.
PubMed ID
17323777 View in PubMed
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[Accelerated development of spinal degenerative changes during low back pain in young people]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31687
Source
Lik Sprava. 2001 Sep-Dec;(5-6):98-101
Publication Type
Article
Author
V V Gongal'skyi
R M Ambartsumov
Ie G Kopyl
Source
Lik Sprava. 2001 Sep-Dec;(5-6):98-101
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Back Pain - complications - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Child
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Inflammation - physiopathology
Lumbar Vertebrae - physiopathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Spinal Diseases - etiology - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Ultrasonography
Abstract
A possibility has been explored of an accelerated development of degenerative changes in the vertebral column in those young people whose activity is connected with high physical loads on the lumbar spine. A comparative analysis was done of results of the ultrasound investigation and magnetic-resonance tomography of spinal soft tissues. Sonographic techniques permit the conclusion to be reached that there develop degenerative and inflammatory processes at the level of certain vertebral segments at the preX-ray stage when it is only the soft-tissue structures that are involved.
PubMed ID
11881396 View in PubMed
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Access to multiple sclerosis diagnosis for Canadian neurologists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201931
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 1999 May;26(2):115-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
P. O'Connor
L. Lee
Author Affiliation
Division of Neurology, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 1999 May;26(2):115-8
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - utilization
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - diagnosis
Neurology - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
Access to multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis in Canada has never been assessed. This study was designed to examine the pattern of MS diagnosis in Canada, including neurologists' diagnostic approach and waiting times for investigations.
A mail survey was forwarded to every registered neurologist in Canada (n = 479) in late 1996. Questions included their diagnostic approach to MS including perceived waiting times for various investigations including MRI. Actual MRI waiting periods were separately obtained from booking clerks or neuroradiologists from every MRI unit in Canada.
153 responses were received. Neurological assessment is obtained, on average, 1 month after referral. MRI is routinely ordered by 92% of neurologists for suspected MS followed by evoked potentials (EP) (36%) and lumbar puncture (LP) (17%). The perceived waiting period for EP and LP is less than one month but 3 months for MRI. This is very similar to the actual waiting periods obtained from the MRI units surveyed (mean of 101 days). There is a trend for longer waiting periods as one moved east to west (Eastern provinces--mean of 62 days, Ontario--95 days, Quebec--102 days and 122 days in the Western provinces). Private MRI units have appeared in the Western provinces and have the shortest waiting periods (2 weeks maximum). The current MRI/million population ratio in Canada is 1.8, far below the ratios of other developed nations.
Canadian neurologists prefer MRI of the brain to confirm an MS diagnosis and desire greater access to it. Access to neurological assessment, EP and LP is probably adequate but the average wait for MRI of 3 months is relatively long. The perceived average waiting period for MRI is similar to the actual waiting times of 3 months, with the Western provinces of Canada having the longest waits. Canada continues to have one of the lowest MRI/population ratios in the developed world.
PubMed ID
10352870 View in PubMed
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1216 records – page 1 of 122.