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Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2002 Dec;24(12):938-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Robert W Webster
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2002 Dec;24(12):938-40
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications
Diabetes Complications
Female
Humans
Hypertension - complications
Indians, North American
MEDLINE
Menopause - psychology
Middle Aged
Vasomotor System - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the characteristics of menopause in Aboriginal women, in particular Canadian Aboriginal women. METHODS: An extensive review of articles extracted from both medical and non-medical databases was undertaken. The search strategy combined the key word "menopause" with any of the following terms: Aboriginals, Native Americans, Natives, Indians, Métis, Inuit, Eskimo, and Indigenous people. RESULTS: A total of 29 records were found, 13 of which had results relevant to the objective of the study. These articles suggest that menopause may have a positive effect on the lives of Aboriginal women with respect to increasing their freedom within the community. Aboriginal women appear to experience fewer vasomotor symptoms than other North American women. CONCLUSION: More research needs to be done to determine the effect menopause has on Canadian Aboriginal women and their coexisting diseases such as cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. This work will allow health care providers to make more informed decisions on managing Aboriginal women's transition through menopause in areas such as hormone replacement therapy.
PubMed ID
12464991 View in PubMed
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Advanced reproductive age and fertility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129652
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2011 Nov;33(11):1165-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Kimberly Liu
Allison Case
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2011 Nov;33(11):1165-75
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous
Adult
Aging - physiology
Canada
Chromosome Aberrations - statistics & numerical data
Counseling
Female
Fertility - physiology
Humans
Infertility, Female
MEDLINE
Male
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Oocyte Donation
Ovary - physiology
Paternal Age
Pregnancy
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted - economics
Risk factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To improve awareness of the natural age-related decline in female and male fertility with respect to natural fertility and assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and provide recommendations for their management, and to review investigations in the assessment of ovarian aging.
This guideline reviews options for the assessment of ovarian reserve and fertility treatments using ART with women of advanced reproductive age presenting with infertility.
The outcomes measured are the predictive value of ovarian reserve testing and pregnancy rates with natural and assisted fertility.
Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed or Medline, CINAHL, and The Cochrane Library in June 2010, using appropriate key words (ovarian aging, ovarian reserve, advanced maternal age, advanced paternal age, ART). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date or language restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated into the guideline to December 2010.
The quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Recommendations for practice were ranked according to the method described in that report (Table).
Primary and specialist health care providers and women will be better informed about ovarian aging and the age-related decline in natural fertility and about options for assisted reproductive technology.
1. Women in their 20s and 30s should be counselled about the age-related risk of infertility when other reproductive health issues, such as sexual health or contraception, are addressed as part of their primary well-woman care. Reproductive-age women should be aware that natural fertility and assisted reproductive technology success (except with egg donation) is significantly lower for women in their late 30s and 40s. (II-2A) 2. Because of the decline in fertility and the increased time to conception that occurs after the age of 35, women > 35 years of age should be referred for infertility work-up after 6 months of trying to conceive. (III-B) 3. Ovarian reserve testing may be considered for women = 35 years of age or for women 40 years of age. Women > 40 years should consider IVF if they do not conceive within 1 to 2 cycles of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation. (II-2B) 6. The only effective treatment for ovarian aging is oocyte donation. A woman with decreased ovarian reserve should be offered oocyte donation as an option, as pregnancy rates associated with this treatment are significantly higher than those associated with controlled ovarian hyperstimulation or in vitro fertilization with a woman's own eggs. (II-2B) 7. Women should be informed that the risk of spontaneous pregnancy loss and chromosomal abnormalities increases with age. Women should be counselled about and offered appropriate prenatal screening once pregnancy is established. (II-2A) 8. Pre-conception counselling regarding the risks of pregnancy with advanced maternal age, promotion of optimal health and weight, and screening for concurrent medical conditions such as hypertension and diabetes should be considered for women > age 40. (III-B) 9. Advanced paternal age appears to be associated with an increased risk of spontaneous abortion and increased frequency of some autosomal dominant conditions, autism spectrum disorders, and schizophrenia. Men > age 40 and their partners should be counselled about these potential risks when they are seeking pregnancy, although the risks remain small. (II-2C).
PubMed ID
22082792 View in PubMed
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[A lot in Alconline is missing in Medline].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207919
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Jul 9;94(28-29):2531
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-9-1997
Author
B. Kleijn
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Jul 9;94(28-29):2531
Date
Jul-9-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism
Databases, Bibliographic
Humans
MEDLINE
Opioid-Related Disorders
Sweden
PubMed ID
9254312 View in PubMed
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Amniocentesis and women with hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or human immunodeficiency virus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186740
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2003 Feb;25(2):145-48, 149-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Gregory Davies
R Douglas Wilson
Valérie Désilets
Gregory J Reid
Dorothy Shaw
Anne Summers
Philip Wyatt
David Young
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2003 Feb;25(2):145-48, 149-52
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amniocentesis - methods
Canada
Female
HIV Infections - prevention & control - transmission
Hepatitis B - prevention & control - transmission
Hepatitis C - prevention & control - transmission
Humans
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical
MEDLINE
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - virology
Prenatal Diagnosis - methods
Risk factors
Abstract
To review the risk of in utero infection through amniocentesis in women with hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).
Fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality.
Review articles, meta-analyses, and MEDLINE searches from 1966 to 2002 for English-language articles related to amniocentesis, fetal and neonatal infection, and hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or HIV.
The evidence collected was reviewed by the Genetics Committee of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) and quantified using the Evaluation of Evidence guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Exam.
1. The risk of fetal hepatitis B infection through amniocentesis is low. However, knowledge of the maternal hepatitis B e antigen status is valuable in the counselling of risks associated with amniocentesis. (II-1C) 2. Amniocentesis in women infected with hepatitis C does not appear to significantly increase the risk of vertical transmission, but women should be counselled that very few studies have properly addressed this possibility. (II-2C) 3. In HIV-positive women all noninvasive screening tools should be used prior to considering amniocentesis. (II-2D) 4. For women infected with hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or HIV, the addition of noninvasive methods of prenatal risk screening, such as nuchal translucency, triple screening, and anatomic ultrasound, may help in reducing the age-related risk to a level below the threshold for genetic amniocentesis. (II-2C) 5. For those women infected with hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or HIV who insist on amniocentesis, every effort should be made to avoid inserting the needle through the placenta. (II-1B) VALIDATION: These guidelines have been approved by the SOGC Genetics Committee, SOGC Executive, and SOGC Council.
The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada.
PubMed ID
12577132 View in PubMed
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Anesthesia research productivity in Canadian universities: a full picture? (II).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168137
Source
Can J Anaesth. 2006 Aug;53(8):845-6; author reply 847-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006

Anesthesia research productivity in Canadian universities: a full picture? (III).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168135
Source
Can J Anaesth. 2006 Aug;53(8):846-7; author reply 847-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006

Back to front? Examining research priorities in rheumatology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224267
Source
Br J Rheumatol. 1992 Mar;31(3):193-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
G H Williams
A S Rigby
A C Papageorgiou
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Studies, University College Salford.
Source
Br J Rheumatol. 1992 Mar;31(3):193-6
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Back Pain - epidemiology
Great Britain - epidemiology
Health Priorities
Humans
MEDLINE
North America - epidemiology
Research Design
Rheumatology - methods
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
Arthrosis and back troubles together account for at least a third of all rheumatic suffering, and they are much the commonest rheumatological causes of impairment and disability. In contrast to the inflammatory arthropathies, one cannot help but be struck by the fact that research endeavour has not been commensurate with the burden that has to be endured.
Notes
Comment In: Br J Rheumatol. 1992 Aug;31(8):505-61643448
PubMed ID
1531777 View in PubMed
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A bibliometric analysis of cancer among American Indians & Alaska Natives, 1966-1993.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4085
Source
Alaska Med. 1995 Apr-Jun;37(2):59-62, 77
Publication Type
Article
Author
M C Mahoney
A M Michalek
Author Affiliation
Department of Educational Affairs, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263, USA.
Source
Alaska Med. 1995 Apr-Jun;37(2):59-62, 77
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Bibliometrics
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
MEDLINE
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
A bibliometric analysis was employed to objectively assess scientific studies published between 1966 and 1993 which have described cancer among American Indians and Alaska Natives. Searches of the MEDLINE (1966-1993) and CANCERLIT data bases (1983-1994) were used to identify relevant publications. In addition to examining publication sources and quantitative temporal trends, further bibliometric analyses were completed by considering a subset of papers published between 1982 and 1992. A total of 128 studies of cancer among American Indians and Alaska Natives were published between 1966 and 1993; 62 of these articles (48%) appeared between 1988 and 1993. Nine journals accounted for 53% of the total publications. The subset of 68 papers published between 1982 and 1992 were cited a total of 388 times in 136 different journals; the median number of citations was 2. Results demonstrate a limited number of published papers on cancer among American Indians and Alaska Natives. It is hoped that this paper will increase the awareness of cancer as an important health problem among American Indian and Alaska Natives and thereby serve to stimulate additional cancer-related research activities involving these groups.
PubMed ID
7661328 View in PubMed
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Canadian research contributions to low-vision rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155615
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2008 Aug;43(4):414-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Joshua C Teichman
Samuel N Markowitz
Author Affiliation
Low Vision Service (University Health Network Hospitals), Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2008 Aug;43(4):414-8
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - statistics & numerical data
Biomedical Research - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research
Humans
MEDLINE - statistics & numerical data
Ophthalmology - statistics & numerical data
Optometry - statistics & numerical data
Publications - statistics & numerical data
Vision, Low - rehabilitation
Abstract
Demographic changes likely to occur in the near future and the need for planning to address them are behind the urgent drive to assess present-day provision and utilization of low-vision rehabilitation (LVR) services in the community. Perhaps even more important is the assessment of supporting research work in this field of health care. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to investigate the current involvement of researchers in Canada in the elucidation of the LVR sciences.
A PubMed search of the MEDLINE database was performed. Publications were identified according to preset criteria and search key words pertinent to various aspects of LVR sciences. Data were collected on the corresponding authors and their affiliations, type of journal and type of study performed, and reported outcome measures.
Approximately 1500 papers were reviewed, and 131 that met the preset criteria were included in the study. Medical doctors published most papers (48.1%), followed by optometrists, those with PhDs, occupational therapists, and others; most of the papers (44.3%) were published in ophthalmology journals. Research was performed mainly at Canadian universities (84%), and the findings were published in the last 3 decades. The studies largely concentrated on rehabilitation services and other aspects of vision rehabilitation (55%), whereas studies focusing on the evaluation of tools used for assessment of either visual functions or functional vision were in the minority (45%).
The majority of research activity in Canada is university based and involves the medical profession in a leading role, thus affording LVR the appropriate medium for promotion and development of a multidisciplinary approach to outstanding research issues. Only a fraction of current research in LVR (12.2%) deals with outcome measures of the therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring functional vision.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Ophthalmol. 2009 Aug;44(4):464; author reply 46419606175
PubMed ID
18711453 View in PubMed
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51 records – page 1 of 6.