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Advanced vertebral fracture among newly diagnosed children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: results of the Canadian Steroid-Associated Osteoporosis in the Pediatric Population (STOPP) research program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152682
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2009 Jul;24(7):1326-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Jacqueline Halton
Isabelle Gaboury
Ronald Grant
Nathalie Alos
Elizabeth A Cummings
Maryann Matzinger
Nazih Shenouda
Brian Lentle
Sharon Abish
Stephanie Atkinson
Elizabeth Cairney
David Dix
Sara Israels
David Stephure
Beverly Wilson
John Hay
David Moher
Frank Rauch
Kerry Siminoski
Leanne M Ward
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2009 Jul;24(7):1326-34
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bone Density - drug effects
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Glucocorticoids - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Lumbar Vertebrae - injuries
Male
Osteoporosis - chemically induced - epidemiology
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Prevalence
Spinal Fractures - chemically induced - epidemiology
Thoracic Vertebrae - injuries
Abstract
Vertebral compression is a serious complication of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The prevalence and pattern of vertebral fractures, as well as their relationship to BMD and other clinical indices, have not been systematically studied. We evaluated spine health in 186 newly diagnosed children (median age, 5.3 yr; 108 boys) with ALL (precursor B cell: N = 167; T cell: N = 19) who were enrolled in a national bone health research program. Patients were assessed within 30 days of diagnosis by lateral thoraco-lumbar spine radiograph, bone age (also used for metacarpal morphometry), and BMD. Vertebral morphometry was carried out by the Genant semiquantitative method. Twenty-nine patients (16%) had a total of 75 grade 1 or higher prevalent vertebral compression fractures (53 thoracic, 71%; 22 lumbar). Grade 1 fractures as the worst grade were present in 14 children (48%), 9 patients (31%) had grade 2 fractures, and 6 children (21%) had grade 3 fractures. The distribution of spine fracture was bimodal, with most occurring in the midthoracic and thoraco-lumbar regions. Children with grade 1 or higher vertebral compression had reduced lumbar spine (LS) areal BMD Z-scores compared with those without (mean +/- SD, -2.1 +/- 1.5 versus -1.1 +/- 1.2; p
Notes
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PubMed ID
19210218 View in PubMed
Less detail

An audit of imaging test utilization for the management of lymphoma in an oncology hospital: implications for resource planning?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170636
Source
Br J Radiol. 2006 Feb;79(938):116-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
A. Schwartz
M K Gospodarowicz
K. Khalili
M. Pintilie
S. Goddard
A. Keller
R W Tsang
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 Canada.
Source
Br J Radiol. 2006 Feb;79(938):116-22
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cancer Care Facilities - utilization
Child
Diagnostic Imaging - utilization
Female
Humans
Lymphoma - diagnosis
Male
Medical Audit
Middle Aged
Ontario
Patient Care Planning
Physician's Practice Patterns
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - utilization
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assist with resource planning by examining the pattern of physician utilization of imaging procedures for lymphoma patients in a dedicated oncology hospital. The proportion of imaging tests ordered for routine follow up with no specific clinical indication was quantified, with specific attention to CT scans. A 3-month audit was performed. The reasons for ordering all imaging procedures (X-rays, CT scans, ultrasound, nuclear scan and MRI) were determined through a retrospective chart review. 411 lymphoma patients had 686 assessments (sets of imaging tests) and 981 procedures (individual imaging tests). Most procedures were CT scans (52%) and chest radiographs (30%). The most common reasons for ordering imaging were assessing response (23%), and investigating new symptoms (19%). Routine follow up constituted 21% of the assessments (142/686), and of these, 82% were chest radiographs (116/142), while 24% (34/142) were CT scans. With analysis restricted to CT scans (296 assessments in 248 patients), the most common reason for ordering CT scans were response evaluation (40%), and suspicion of recurrence and/or new symptom (23%). Follow-up CT scans done with no clinical indication comprised 8% (25/296) of all CT assessments. Staging CT scans were under-represented at 6% of all assessments. Imaging with CT scans for follow up of asymptomatic patients is infrequent. However, scans done for staging new lymphoma patients were unexpectedly low in frequency, due to scans done elsewhere prior to referral. This analysis uncovered utilization patterns, helped resource planning and provided data to reduce unnecessary imaging procedures.
PubMed ID
16489192 View in PubMed
Less detail

Archival bone marrow samples: suitable for multiple biomarker analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265165
Source
Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol. 2015 Jan;23(1):71-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Bendik Lund
Laeya A Najmi
Agata Wesolowska-Andersen
Veslemøy M Landsem
Kirsten K Rasmussen
Louise Borst
Ramneek Gupta
Kjeld Schmiegelow
Helge Klungland
Source
Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol. 2015 Jan;23(1):71-7
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Biopsy
Bone Banks - standards
Bone Marrow - physiology
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA - analysis - isolation & purification
Denmark
Female
Fluorometry
Genome - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Male
Microsatellite Repeats - genetics
Norway
Pilot Projects
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma - diagnosis - genetics
Specimen Handling
Spectrophotometry
Tumor Markers, Biological - analysis
Abstract
AB Archival samples represent a significant potential for genetic studies, particularly in severe diseases with risk of lethal outcome, such as in cancer. In this pilot study, we aimed to evaluate the usability of archival bone marrow smears and biopsies for DNA extraction and purification, whole genome amplification (WGA), multiple marker analysis including 10 short tandem repeats, and finally a comprehensive genotyping of 33,683 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with multiplexed targeted next-generation sequencing. A total of 73 samples from 21 bone marrow smears and 13 bone marrow biopsies from 18 Danish and Norwegian childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients were included and compared with corresponding blood samples. Samples were grouped according to the age of sample and whether WGA was performed or not. We found that measurements of DNA concentration after DNA extraction was dependent on detection method and that spectrophotometry overestimated DNA amount compared with fluorometry. In the short tandem repeat analysis, detection rate dropped slightly with longer fragments. After WGA, this drop was more pronounced. Samples stored for 0 to 3 years showed better results compared with samples stored for 4 to 10 years. Acceptable call rates for SNPs were detected for 7 of 42 archival samples. In conclusion, archival bone marrow samples are suitable for DNA extraction and multiple marker analysis, but WGA was less successful, especially when longer fragments were analyzed. Multiple SNP analysis seems feasible, but the method has to be further optimized.
PubMed ID
25621358 View in PubMed
Less detail

Asymptomatic anomalous pulmonary veins in a Siberian Husky.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17782
Source
Aust Vet J. 2003 Jul;81(7):406-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
L A Abraham
R F Slocombe
Author Affiliation
University of Melbourne, Department of Veterinary Science, 250 Princes Highway, Werribee, Victoria 3030.
Source
Aust Vet J. 2003 Jul;81(7):406-8
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Brain Neoplasms - diagnosis - veterinary
Diagnosis, Differential
Dog Diseases - diagnosis - pathology
Dogs
Heart Defects, Congenital - diagnosis - veterinary
Lymphoma - diagnosis - veterinary
Male
Meningitis - diagnosis - veterinary
Pulmonary Veins - abnormalities
Abstract
A 2-year-old, neutered male Siberian Husky presented with depression, weight loss and an inability to prehend food and water. Cerebrospinal fluid was collected under general anaesthesia prior to euthanasia. The elevated white cell count comprised mostly mononuclear cells. Histological changes within the brain were variable and multifocal. Non-suppurative meningitis secondary to lymphoma was diagnosed. At necropsy, abnormal venous drainage of the right cranial and middle lung lobes was found. A dilated major pulmonary vein from these lobes passed across the lateral aspect of the right caudal lung lobe prior to entering the heart, and subpleural veins from the affected lobes were enlarged and tortuous. These vascular abnormalities were considered incidental. There were no apparent congenital abnormalities of the heart and the animal's clinical signs were related to lymphoma of the brain.
PubMed ID
15084052 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Attitude to the illness of patients with malignant lymphomas on various stages of disease].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112589
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2013;59(2):116-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
E V Pestereva
V A Chulkova
Iu N Vinogradova
N V Il'in
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2013;59(2):116-20
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude
Chronic Disease
Denial (Psychology)
Female
Humans
Lymphoma - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Recurrence
Russia
Abstract
In 138 patients with malignant lymphomas on different stages of the disease there were considered attitude to the illness and treatment, which included relation to the diagnosis, the subjective perception of the disease and attitude to treatment. Using a technique of studying psychological attitude to the disease there were studied details of personal response to the disease. Along with the general trends in relation to the disease, specific to cancer patients of different tumor sites, there have been identified particular features related to attitude of malignant lymphoma patients: a long period of denial of a malignant nature of the disease and their greatest psychological trauma during relapse. The necessity of professional psychological support was showed.
PubMed ID
23814861 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Bone marrow aspiration. Use and benefits]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24496
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Mar 10;112(7):909-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-1992
Author
J. Hammerstrøm
Author Affiliation
Hematologisk seksjon, Medisinsk avdeling, Regionsykehuset i Trondheim.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Mar 10;112(7):909-11
Date
Mar-10-1992
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biopsy, Needle - methods
Bone Marrow - pathology
Bone Marrow Examination - methods
Cost-Benefit Analysis
English Abstract
Humans
Leukemia - diagnosis - pathology
Lymphoma - diagnosis - pathology
Norway
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Bone marrow aspiration is an old and well-established test procedure, the use of which may rest more on diagnostic tradition than on scientific documentation. Its use was evaluated in a Norwegian regional hospital by registering indication, presence of pathology and clinical "utility" judged from a given definition, in 200 reports on bone marrow aspiration. The result was pathological in 53%, and judged to be clinically useful in 61% of the tests. The diagnostic yield was highest for indications related to bone marrow function, and low for unspecific indications such as fever of unknown origin and elevated SR without M-component. The large number of results with pathological findings that are judged to be clinically useful raise the question of whether use of this test should be increased.
PubMed ID
1557761 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1982 Aug;144(34):2492-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1982

50 records – page 1 of 5.