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131I dose-dependent thyroid autoimmune disorders in children living around Chernobyl.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34164
Source
Clin Immunol Immunopathol. 1997 Sep;84(3):251-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
E V Vykhovanets
V P Chernyshov
I I Slukvin
Y G Antipkin
A N Vasyuk
H F Klimenko
K W Strauss
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Immunology, Institute of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kiev, Ukraine.
Source
Clin Immunol Immunopathol. 1997 Sep;84(3):251-9
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Autoantibodies - blood
Autoimmune Diseases - etiology
Child
Humans
Iodine Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Lymphocyte Count
Lymphocyte Subsets - chemistry - immunology
Radioactive fallout
Radioactive Pollutants - adverse effects
Thyroglobulin - immunology
Thyroid Diseases - immunology
Thyroid Gland - ultrasonography
Thyroid Hormones - blood
Thyrotropin - blood
Ukraine
Abstract
We assessed the major lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood, thyroid ultrasonography, levels of serum autoantibodies to thyroglobulin (AbTg), thyroid hormones, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in 53 children without any chronic diseases living continuously around Chernobyl. The subjects ranged in age from 7 to 14 years and had different doses of 131I to their thyroid. Healthy children living on noncontaminated areas were assessed as controls. The majority of children with doses of 131I had normal levels of thyroid hormones. However, the percentages of positive sera for AbTg, TSH levels, ultrasonographic thyroid abnormalities, and abnormal echogenicity were significantly higher in children with doses of 131I than in controls. The dose of 131I to thyroid correlated positively with serum AbTg levels, percentage of CD3+CD4+ cells, and CD3+CD4+/CD3+CD8+ cell ratio and negatively with number of CD3+CD8+ and CD3-/CD16, CD56+ cells. Thus, our study demonstrates an association between dose of 131I and autoimmune thyroid disorders in this population of children.
PubMed ID
9281383 View in PubMed
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Acute impact of submaximal resistance exercise on immunological and hormonal parameters in young men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9539
Source
J Sports Sci. 2003 Dec;21(12):1001-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Alfons Ramel
Karl-Heinz Wagner
Ibrahim Elmadfa
Author Affiliation
Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland, PO Box Nyi Gardur, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland. ramel@hi.is
Source
J Sports Sci. 2003 Dec;21(12):1001-8
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
CD4-CD8 Ratio
Comparative Study
Hematocrit
Humans
Hydrocortisone - blood
Killer Cells, Natural - physiology
Leukocyte Count
Lymphocyte Count
Male
Monocytes - physiology
Neutrophils - physiology
Norepinephrine - blood
Physical Education and Training - methods
Reference Values
T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer - physiology
T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory - physiology
Time Factors
Abstract
In this study, we examined the acute effects of submaximal resistance exercise on immunological and hormonal parameters in 7 resistance-trained and 10 non-resistance-trained males. The participants, who were aged 29.5 +/- 7.1 years (mean +/- s), performed submaximal resistance exercise at 75% of their one-repetition maximum. Blood samples were taken before, during, immediately after, and 30, 60 and 120 min after exercise and analysed for leukocyte subpopulations and stress hormones. Total leukocytes, neutrophils and monocytes increased during exercise, reaching their maximum 2 h after exercise. Lymphocytes increased during exercise, T-helper cells returned to resting values after exercise, and natural killer cells and T-suppressor cells decreased below resting values. The CD4/CD8 ratio decreased during exercise but increased during recovery. The resistance-trained participants tended to have lower T-helper cell counts before, during and immediately after exercise and a lower CD4/CD8 ratio during recovery than the non-resistance-trained participants. Plasma cortisol correlated positively with leukocytes during exercise (r = 0.572, P
PubMed ID
14748457 View in PubMed
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[Adaptive response of blood lymphocytes as a marker of hemopoiesis status in exposed persons].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126505
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2011 Nov-Dec;51(6):645-50
Publication Type
Article
Author
A V Akleev
A V Aleshchenko
O V Kudriashova
L P Semenova
A M Serebrianyi
O I Khudiakova
I I Pelevina
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2011 Nov-Dec;51(6):645-50
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Adult
Aged
Bone Marrow Cells - radiation effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Female
Hematopoiesis - radiation effects
Hematopoietic Stem Cells - radiation effects
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects
Lymphocyte Count
Lymphocytes - cytology - physiology - radiation effects
Male
Middle Aged
Radiation, Ionizing
Rivers
Russia
Strontium Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Water Pollution, Radioactive - adverse effects
Abstract
An obvious correlation between the type of reaction manifested by peripheral blood lymphocytes to low dose irradiation in vitro (adaptive potential), the RBM cell composition (during the period of the major exposure), and the peripheral blood cell composition (at a late time period coincident with the studies of induced radioresistance) has been found in the Techa riverside residents in the later periods after the onset of a long-term low-dose rate radiation exposure (55-60 years later) within a range of individual red bone marrow doses from 0.01 to 1.79 Gy. The nature of these dependences observed in chronically exposed individuals differs from that revealed in the controls. It can be suggested based on the results of the study that the capacity for the adaptive response shown by peripheral blood lymphocytes donated by exposed persons in the remote period after exposure can be regarded as a biological marker of the functional state of the hemopoietic stem cell pool.
PubMed ID
22384713 View in PubMed
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[A deficient T-cell count and its elimination during the treatment and prevention of infections].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214429
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1995 Sep-Oct;(5):68-71
Publication Type
Article
Author
A M Zemskov
V M Zemskov
V A Platonova
E D Chertok
A M Tupkalova
A T Vysotskaia
T A Zemskova
A A Degtiarev
S E Furgal
Iu A Evstratov
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1995 Sep-Oct;(5):68-71
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adjuvants, Immunologic - administration & dosage
Adolescent
Adult
Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - immunology - prevention & control
Biological Markers
Carrier State - drug therapy - immunology - prevention & control
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Female
Humans
Infant
Lymphocyte Count
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel
Nucleic Acids - administration & dosage
Russia
T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Abstract
The results of the study of the parameters of the immune system in persons suffering from frequent infections, bacteriocarriers and persons with nonspecific infections are presented. The study revealed that T-cell deficiency of the 2nd and 3rd degrees could be regarded as the universal marker of decreased immune reactiveness. Sodium nucleinate was found to be capable of stimulating the T-cell element of immunity and antibody formation, which made it possible to achieve a considerable decrease in morbidity rate. Sodium nucleinate was shown to be highly effective in the prophylaxis of acute respiratory viral infections, carrier state and in the sanitation of purulent foci of infection.
PubMed ID
8525738 View in PubMed
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Adherence and plasma HIV RNA responses to highly active antiretroviral therapy among HIV-1 infected injection drug users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183497
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Sep 30;169(7):656-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-2003
Author
Evan Wood
Julio S G Montaner
Benita Yip
Mark W Tyndall
Martin T Schechter
Michael V O'Shaughnessy
Robert S Hogg
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC. ewood@hivnet.ubc.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Sep 30;169(7):656-61
Date
Sep-30-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active
British Columbia
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Female
HIV Infections - blood - drug therapy - etiology
HIV-1
Humans
Male
Patient compliance
RNA, Viral - blood - drug effects
Substance Abuse, Intravenous
Abstract
The benefits of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for the treatment of HIV infection are well documented, but concerns regarding access and adherence to HAART are growing. We evaluated virological responses to HAART among HIV-1 infected patients who were injection drug users (IDUs) in a population-based setting where HIV/AIDS care is delivered free of charge.
We evaluated previously untreated HIV-1 infected men and women who initiated HAART between Aug. 1, 1996, and July 31, 2000, and who were followed until Mar. 31, 2002, in a province-wide HIV treatment program. We used Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression in our evaluation of time to suppression (i.e., less than 500 copies/mL) and rebound (i.e., 500 copies/mL or more) of plasma HIV-1 RNA, with patients stratified according to whether or not they had a history of injection drug use.
Overall, 1422 patients initiated HAART during the study period, of whom 359 (25.2%) were IDUs. In Kaplan-Meier analyses, the cumulative suppression rate at 12 months after initiation of HAART was 70.8% for non-IDUs and 51.4% for IDUs (p 0.1).
Non-IDUs and IDUs had similar rates of HIV-1 RNA suppression and rebound after the initiation of HAART, once lower levels of adherence were taken into account. Nevertheless, the lower virological response rates among IDUs suggest that, unless interventions are undertaken to improve adherence, these patients may experience elevated rates of disease progression and use of medical services in our setting.
Notes
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PubMed ID
14517122 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the cervical cancer screening program in women living with HIV in Denmark: comparison with the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259332
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2014;14:256
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Kristina Thorsteinsson
Steen Ladelund
Søren Jensen-Fangel
Terese L Katzenstein
Isik Somuncu Johansen
Gitte Pedersen
Jette Junge
Marie Helleberg
Merete Storgaard
Anne-Mette Lebech
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2014;14:256
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Early Detection of Cancer
Female
HIV Infections
Humans
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis
Vaginal Smears - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Women living with HIV (WLWH) are at increased risk of invasive cervical cancer (ICC). International HIV guidelines suggest cervical screening twice the first year after HIV diagnosis and thereafter annually. Adherence to the HIV cervical screening program in Denmark is unknown.
We studied women from a population-based, nationwide HIV cohort in Denmark and a cohort of age-matched females from the general population. Screening behaviour was assessed from 1999-2010. Adjusted odds ratios (OR's) for screening attendance in the two cohorts and potential predictors of attendance to guidelines were estimated. Pathology specimens were identified from The Danish Pathology Data Bank.
We followed 1143 WLWH and 17,145 controls with no prior history of ICC for 9,509 and 157,362 person-years. The first year after HIV diagnosis 2.6% of WLWH obtained the recommended two cervical cytologies. During the different calendar intervals throughout the study period between 29-46% of WLWH followed the HIV cervical screening guidelines. Adjusted OR's of attendance to the general population screening program for WLWH aged 30, 40 and 50 years, compared to controls, were 0.69 (95% CI: 0.56-0.87), 0.67 (0.55-0.80) and 0.84 (0.61-1.15). Predictors of attendance to the HIV cervical screening program were a CD4 count?>?350 cells/µL and HIV RNA?
Notes
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PubMed ID
24885577 View in PubMed
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Adverse health effects for individuals who move between HIV care centers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136756
Source
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2011 May 1;57(1):51-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2011
Author
Hartmut B Krentz
Heather Worthington
M John Gill
Author Affiliation
Southern Alberta Clinic, Sheldon M Chumir Health Centre, Calgary, AB, Canada. hartmut.krentz@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2011 May 1;57(1):51-4
Date
May-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Continuity of Patient Care
Delivery of Health Care - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
HIV - isolation & purification
HIV Infections - immunology - therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Dropouts
Abstract
Studies on patient mobility have focused on patients who become lost-to-follow-up (LTFU). Much less is known about patients who move with a planned transfer of care from one HIV center to another. We assess disease progression in patients who moved and then returned to our care compared with patients remaining or were LTFU.
We identified which patients left our HIV care program between January 01,2000, to January 01,2008, defined how they left (either moved or LTFU), and then determined the health status of returning patients. We examined the impact of the move on their health by comparing clinical measurements (eg, CD4, new AIDS) at their departure and on return.
Forty-four percent of all patients left care; 38% of these returned. In contrast to those remaining in local care whose CD4 counts climbed, "moved" patients exhibited deterioration in both CD4 counts and incident AIDS comparable to LFTU patients. Only 1 in 3 patients who moved had our medical records requested by a new HIV center.
We suspect that despite forward planning, a move may result in potential serious interruptions and/or disengagements of care. The potential harmful health effects can in some be equivalent becoming LTFU. Recognizing and addressing the potential disruption in care from a planned move may be of value in improving outcomes.
PubMed ID
21346587 View in PubMed
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Affects of ionizing radiation on T-cell population lymphocyte: a risk factor of irritable bowel syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97544
Source
Toxicol Ind Health. 2010 Jul;26(6):323-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
M R Sheikh Sajjadieh
L V Kuznetsova
V B Bojenko
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Immunology & Allergology, National Medical Academy for Post Graduate Education, Kiev, Ukraine. mohammad_esfahan@yahoo.com
Source
Toxicol Ind Health. 2010 Jul;26(6):323-30
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antigens, CD3 - immunology
CD4-CD8 Ratio
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes - radiation effects
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes - radiation effects
Case-Control Studies
Cesium Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Child
Child, Preschool
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Humans
Immunity, Cellular - radiation effects
Irritable Bowel Syndrome - etiology
Lymphocyte Count
Risk factors
T-Lymphocytes - radiation effects
Abstract
Irritable bowel syndrome is observed mostly in Ukrainian children and may be related to adverse health effects as a result of the Chernobyl disaster. The aim of this study was to determine status of T-cell population lymphocytes in children with clinical symptom of irritable bowel syndrome. The test population consisted of 95 participants: 75 rural patients aged 4 to 18 who lived in a contaminated area exposed to natural environmental radiation with clinical symptom of irritable bowel syndrome (categorized in three groups) and 20 healthy urban participants from Kiev aged 5 to 15 as control group. Internal radiation activity has been measured by gamma-ray spectrometry. Peripheral blood leukocytes were analyzed for T-lymphocytes subset such as T-lymphocytes (CD3(+)), T-helper (CD4(+)) and T-cytotoxic (CD8(+)) and then CD4/CD8 ratio was calculated. Percentage of CD3(+) and CD4(+) in all study groups decreased significantly in comparison to control group (p
PubMed ID
20348276 View in PubMed
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[AIDS in Denmark. 1. Opportunistic infections and malignant diseases. Danish Study Group for HIV infection]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7897
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Mar 6;157(10):1347-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-6-1995
Author
J D Lundgren
K D Bentsen
C. Pedersen
J. Gerstoft
T. Seefeldt-Nielsen
T L Nielsen
G F Jensen
Author Affiliation
Infektionsmedicinsk afdeling, Hvidovre Hospital, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Mar 6;157(10):1347-51
Date
Mar-6-1995
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - complications
Blood Transfusion - adverse effects
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
HIV Infections - complications
Humans
Male
Sarcoma, Kaposi - etiology
Sexual Behavior
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - complications
Abstract
To examine the distribution of AIDS-defining illnesses among Danish AIDS patients, data on 687 AIDS patients diagnosed in the period from 1980 to 1990 (93% of all reported cases in the period) were collected. The most frequent AIDS-defining illness was Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia followed by candida oesophagitis and Kaposis sarcoma. The proportion of homo/bisexual men presenting with Kaposis sarcoma as the initial AIDS-defining illness declined over time. Patients with extrapulmonary tuberculosis had higher CD4 cell counts than patients presenting with other illnesses. Cytomegalovirus chorioretinitis and atypical mycobacteriosis were seen more frequently after the time of the AIDS diagnosis, and a low CD4 cell count at time of the AIDS diagnosis was a significant predictor for the development of these opportunistic infections during follow-up. Danish AIDS patients present with a wide spectrum of HIV-related illnesses, reflecting their exposure to opportunistic microorganisms and the degree of immune deficiency. The pattern of HIV-related illnesses is changing over time, and therefore continuous surveillance is needed to optimize therapeutic and prophylactic regimens.
PubMed ID
7709482 View in PubMed
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[AIDS in Denmark. 2. Survival after the diagnosis of AIDS. Danish Study Group for HIV infection]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7896
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Mar 6;157(10):1352-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-6-1995
Author
J D Lundgren
C. Pedersen
K D Bentsen
J. Gerstoft
T. Seefeldt-Nielsen
T L Nielsen
G F Jensen
Author Affiliation
Infektionsmedicinsk afdeling, Hvidovre Hospital, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Mar 6;157(10):1352-6
Date
Mar-6-1995
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - diagnosis - immunology - mortality
Adult
Age Factors
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
HIV Infections - diagnosis - mortality
Humans
Male
Prognosis
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Abstract
The survival pattern was studied for 687 Danish AIDS patients (93% of notified cases in the study period) who were diagnosed with AIDS during the period from 1980 to 1990. The median survival was 17 months. Factors significantly associated with a shortened survival were transfusion-acquired HIV infection, age > 40 years, year of diagnosis before 1987, and the presence of either disseminated infection with Mycobacterium avium-complex, Cytomegalovirus chorioretinitis or malignant lymphoma at time of the AIDS diagnosis. There was also a significant association between survival and CD4 cell count at time of AIDS diagnosis. Patients who had CD4 cell counts above 200 x 10(6)/l had twice as long a survival as patients who had CD4 cell counts less than 50 x 10(6)/l. The prognosis of Danish AIDS patients remains poor. The most important determinant of survival time appears to be the degree of immune deficiency at time of diagnosis.
PubMed ID
7709483 View in PubMed
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274 records – page 1 of 28.