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16 records – page 1 of 2.

Clinical significance of nontuberculous mycobacteria isolates in a Canadian tertiary care center.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214856
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 1995 Jul;21(1):128-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
S. Choudhri
J. Manfreda
J. Wolfe
S. Parker
R. Long
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 1995 Jul;21(1):128-33
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Kidney Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Lung Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Lymphatic Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Microbiological Techniques
Middle Aged
Mycobacterium Infections, Nontuberculous - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Nontuberculous Mycobacteria - isolation & purification
Radiography, Thoracic
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
To determine the epidemiology and clinical features of disease due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in our institution, we reviewed the medical records of all patients from whom NTM isolates were recovered from 1988 to 1990 to extract selected clinical and laboratory data. On the basis of the likelihood of infection, patients were classified as having definite, probable, or unlikely NTM disease as defined by published guidelines. Of 80 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 17 had definite NTM disease, and 23 had probable NTM disease. No differences in age, sex, presence of underlying pulmonary or nonpulmonary disease, or chest radiographic abnormalities were noted between patients with and without NTM disease. More than 85% of all definite or probable cases were caused by Mycobacterium avium complex, Mycobacterium kansasii, and Mycobacterium fortuitum complex. The diagnosis of NTM disease was often delayed or missed, which resulted in unsatisfactory management of patients. There is a need to educate physicians about the diagnosis and management of NTM infections.
PubMed ID
7578721 View in PubMed
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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1980 Sep 15;142(38):2481
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1980

[Mortality of geologists in relation to occupational activities].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213484
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1996;(3):12-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
E B Gurvich
N V Lebedeva
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1996;(3):12-7
Date
1996
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Female
Geological Phenomena
Geology
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - mortality
Lymphatic Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Occupations
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Rheumatic Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Uterine Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Vascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
The study covered mortality among a cohort of geologists working in North-Western Russia. The cohort included 3911 geologists, geophysicists and drillers, whose life was followed during 1977-1992. The standardized relative mortality risk with all death causes equalled 0.58 in general. Risk of mortality with hypertension in the male geologists was 21.7 times higher and for the female ones-25.4 times higher than for general population. Definite dependence between the stronger effects and the longer length of service was seen. The highest standardized relative mortality risk appeared among the drillers. Occupational risk factors for geologists reliably increase risk of mortality with active rheumatism, diseases involving arteries, veins and lymphatic vessels. The male geophysicists tend to have higher incidence of prostatic cancer, and female ones-higher incidence of uterine carcinoma.
PubMed ID
8705138 View in PubMed
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Mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome. Review of a recently described disease complex.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247802
Source
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1979 Jan;47(1):26-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1979
Author
G T Terezhalmy
Source
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1979 Jan;47(1):26-30
Date
Jan-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Diagnosis, Differential
Erythema Multiforme - diagnosis
Gingivitis - diagnosis
Herpes Simplex - diagnosis
Humans
Infant
Lymphatic Diseases - epidemiology
Mouth - pathology
Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - pathology - therapy
Scarlet Fever - diagnosis
Stevens-Johnson Syndrome - diagnosis
Stomatitis - diagnosis
United States
Abstract
Mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome (MLNS) has been accepted in Japan as a newly recognized disease affecting most frequently patients under 5 years of age. It is now apparent that the syndrome, having been defined, is also recognized with increasing frequency in the continental United States and Canada in children of non-Japanese ancestry. MLNS is characterized by (1) fever, (2) bilateral congestion of the conjunctivae, (3) changes in the oral cavity, consisting of strawberry tongue, erythema of the oral mucosa, and sicca of the lips, (4) indurative edema and erythema of the hands and feet followed by desquamation of the fingertips, (5) polymorphous exanthema, and (6) cervical lymphadenopathy. The clinical signs and symptoms are somewhat reminiscent of other related conditions. To prevent potentially fatal cardiac complications associated with MLNS, prompt and accurate diagnosis is imperative so that the patient may be referred to a physician for careful monitoring during convalescence.
PubMed ID
282561 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.