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74 records – page 1 of 8.

[42 patients with post-polio syndrome. A retrospective study from Sunnaas hospital]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8224
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Oct 30;111(26):3159-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1991
Author
J K Stanghelle
R. Helseth
K S Roaldsen
S. Rand-Hendriksen
Author Affiliation
Sunnaas sykehus, Nesoddtangen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Oct 30;111(26):3159-62
Date
Oct-30-1991
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Lung Volume Measurements
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Postpoliomyelitis Syndrome - physiopathology - psychology - rehabilitation
Rehabilitation Centers
Retrospective Studies
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
We describe a retrospective study of 42 patients admitted to Sunnaas Rehabilitation Hospital with suspect postpolio syndrome over a period of two years. The patients were 32 females and 10 males aged 28-74 years (mean 54 years). 29 were married or cohabitant, 31 had children, and 20 were in paid employment. The mean age at onset of polio was 12 years, with an average interval of 36 years between onset of polio and onset of new problems. The mean duration of new health problems was seven years. The most common such problems were pain in muscles and joints, general fatigue and new weakness of the muscles. 28 of the patients needed personal assistance to carry out everyday activities. 33 had braces, crutches or wheelchair for ambulation. Lung function was moderately reduced and physical working capacity was severely reduced. Physiotherapy, ergotherapy and technical aids were provided for 38 of the patients, 16 received assistance to organizing social support or help at home, 13 were helped to make practical changes in their homes, and eight were provided with a wheelchair. According to this study, most patients with the postpolio syndrome need interdisciplinary evaluation and management in a rehabilitation hospital.
PubMed ID
1948938 View in PubMed
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[A 49 year old male with a giant pulmonary bulla--a case report and review of the literature]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91438
Source
Laeknabladid. 2008 Oct;94(10):673-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Asgeirsson Hilmar
Lúdvíksdóttir Dóra
Kjartansson Olafur
Gudbjartsson Tómas
Author Affiliation
Landspítala, Hringbraut, Reykjavik.
Source
Laeknabladid. 2008 Oct;94(10):673-7
Date
Oct-2008
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blister - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Humans
Lung - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Lung Diseases - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Lung Volume Measurements
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonectomy
Radiography, Thoracic
Spirometry
Thoracotomy
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
A 49 year old previously healthy smoker was diagnosed with a giant bulla in his right lung, following a history of dry cough, repeated upper airway infections and increasing dyspnea for several years. Computed tomography (CT) confirmed the presence of a giant bulla in the right inferior lobe and several smaller bullae in the right superior lobe. The giant bulla was 17 cm in diameter, occupying more than half of the right hemithorax. On spirometry a moderate restrictive and a mild obstructive pattern was observed. Lung volume was measured with two different techniques, nitrogen washout and plethysmography, with volume of the bullae estimated at 2.9 L, similar to the 3.2 L determined by CT. The patient underwent thoracotomy, where the giant bulla together with the inferior lobe were removed with lobectomy and the small bullae in the superior lobe with wedge resection. Five months postoperatively the patient is in good health and is back at work. Postoperatively significant improvements in spirometry values and lung volume measurements have been documented. This case demonstrates that giant bullae can be successfully managed with surgical resection and their size can be determined by different techniques, including lung volume measurements and chest CT.
PubMed ID
18974430 View in PubMed
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Airway closure in anesthetized infants and children: influence of inspiratory pressures and volumes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31558
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2002 May;46(5):529-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
A. Thorsteinsson
O. Werner
C. Jonmarker
A. Larsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Landspitalinn University Hospital, Hringbraut, Iceland. adalbjn@landspitali.is
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2002 May;46(5):529-36
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Air Pressure
Airway Obstruction - etiology
Calibration
Child
Child, Preschool
Elasticity
Female
Functional Residual Capacity
Humans
Infant
Intraoperative Complications - physiopathology
Lung Volume Measurements
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration, Artificial
Sulfur Hexafluoride - diagnostic use
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Cyclic opening and closing of lung units during tidal breathing may be an important cause of iatrogenic lung injury. We hypothesized that airway closure is uncommon in children with healthy lungs when inspiratory pressures are kept low, but paradoxically may occur when inspiratory pressures are increased. METHODS: Elastic equilibrium volume (EEV) and closing capacity (CC) were measured with a tracer gas (SF(6)) technique in 11 anesthetized, muscle-relaxed, endotracheally intubated and artificially ventilated healthy children, aged 0.6-13 years. Airway closing was studied in a randomized order at two inflation pressures, +20 or +30 cmH(2)O, and CC and CC/EEV were calculated from the plots obtained when the lungs were exsufflated to -20 cmH(2)O. (CC/EEV >1 indicates that airway closure might occur during tidal breathing). Furthermore, a measure of uneven ventilation, multiple breath alveolar mixing efficiency (MBAME), was obtained. RESULTS: Airway closure within the tidal volume (CC/EEV >1) was observed in four and eight children (not significant, NS) after 20 and 30 cmH(2)O inflation, respectively. However, CC(30)/EEV was >CC(20)/EEV in all children (P
PubMed ID
12027847 View in PubMed
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Airways symptoms, immunological response and exposure in powder painting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15090
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2005 Mar;78(2):123-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Anna Blomqvist
Meltem Düzakin-Nystedt
Carl-Göran Ohlson
Lennart Andersson
Bo Jönsson
Jörn Nielsen
Hans Welinder
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2005 Mar;78(2):123-31
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aerosols - toxicity
Aged
Anhydrides - blood - immunology - urine
Comparative Study
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Humans
Immunoglobulin G
Industry
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Lung Volume Measurements
Mass Fragmentography
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Paint - toxicity
Powders - toxicity
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - chemically induced - epidemiology - immunology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Powder painting is an alternative to solvent-based spray painting. Powder paints may contain organic acid anhydrides (OAAs), which are irritants to the airways and may cause sensitisation. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and immunological response among powder painters and to describe the exposure to OAAs. METHODS: In all, 205 subjects in 32 enterprises participated: 93 exposed and 26 formerly exposed workers in 25 powder paint shops and 86 unexposed workers. They completed a questionnaire about working conditions and symptoms and took part in a medical examination, which included a lung function test. Urine samples, for determination of two OAAs, and blood samples, for analysis of specific antibodies against the OAAs, were taken. In addition, 33 paint samples were analysed for nine OAAs. RESULTS: The powder painters reported more work-related respiratory symptoms than unexposed subjects did. The prevalence of three or more symptoms was 24% in subjects with low exposure, 44% in highly exposed individuals, 46% in formerly exposed subjects and 19% in unexposed workers. Asthma symptoms were frequent, 7%, 40%, 15% and 2%, respectively. Regression analyses of the lung volumes did not show any influence of exposure. IgG, but not IgE, against the OAAs and metabolites of OAAs was found in some subjects, but no associations with the exposure could be observed. OAAs were found in only small amounts in the paint samples. CONCLUSIONS: The exposure to organic acid anhydrides was estimated to be low, and yet, IgG antibodies to OAA were observed in some subjects. The prevalence of work-related symptoms from the eyes and the airways was relatively high among the powder painters, and these symptoms, but not the lung volumes, were clearly related to exposure. The symptoms were probably caused by irritative properties of the powder paint dust.
PubMed ID
15726393 View in PubMed
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[An evaluation of a rehabilitation program for patients with chronic obstructive lung disease]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46190
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Feb 20;120(5):551-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-20-2000
Author
C G Schaanning
Author Affiliation
Lungemedisinsk avdeling Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Feb 20;120(5):551-5
Date
Feb-20-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Evaluation Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Length of Stay
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - physiopathology - psychology - rehabilitation - therapy
Lung Volume Measurements
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient care team
Patient Education
Questionnaires
Regional Medical Programs
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Rehabilitation programmes for patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases are established in many countries. In this paper a new rehabilitation programme at Ullevål University Hospital is described and evaluated. We compared patients' (N = 80) use of hospital inpatient services the year before and the year after attending a rehabilitation course. We also compared patients' self-assessed health status before and six and 12 months after rehabilitation using the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale. The percentage of patients needing hospitalization per year was reduced from 45% before the programme to 22% afterwards. There was no change in the total number of hospitalizations or in the number of days spent in hospital. Self-assessed health status had improved. The results are in accordance with reports from similar rehabilitation programmes in other countries.
PubMed ID
10833910 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Mar 20;111(8):935-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-1991
Author
K H Carlsen
S. Oseid
T. Sandnes
B. Trondskog
O. Røksund
Author Affiliation
Voksentoppen/Rikshospitalet, Norges Røde Kors institutt for barn med astma og allergi, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Mar 20;111(8):935-7
Date
Mar-20-1991
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air
Altitude
Asthma - diagnosis - physiopathology - therapy
Bronchodilator Agents
Child
English Abstract
Hospitals, Special
Humans
Lung Volume Measurements
Norway
Abstract
Geilomo hospital for children with asthma and allergy is situated 800 m above sea level in a non-polluted area in the central part of Norway. 31 children who were admitted to this hospital from different parts of Norway (mostly from the main cities) were studied for six weeks. They underwent physical training and daily measurements were taken of lung function and the effect of bronchodilators. The bronchial responsiveness of the children improved significantly from week 1 to week 6, as measured by reduction in lung function after sub-maximal running on a treadmill. There was significant improvement in daily symptom score, and in degree of obstruction as shown by physical examination. The children's improvement was probably the result of a stay in a mountainous area with very little air pollution or allergens, combined with regular planned physical activity, and regular medication and surveillance.
PubMed ID
2042207 View in PubMed
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Breathing patterns during breathing exercises in persons with tetraplegia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18479
Source
Spinal Cord. 2003 May;41(5):290-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
P. Bodin
M. Kreuter
B. Bake
M Fagevik Olsén
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiotherapy, SU/Sahlgrenska, Göteborg S-413 45, Sweden.
Source
Spinal Cord. 2003 May;41(5):290-5
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breath Tests - methods
Breathing Exercises
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forced Expiratory Flow Rates
Humans
Lung Volume Measurements - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Plethysmography
Positive-Pressure Respiration
Pressure
Quadriplegia - physiopathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration
Rest - physiology
Time Factors
Abstract
STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional, observational, controlled study. OBJECTIVES: To survey breathing patterns during breathing at rest, ordinary deep breathing (DB), positive expiratory pressure (PEP) and inspiratory resistance-positive expiratory pressure (IR-PEP) among individuals with a cervical spinal cord lesion (SCL) compared with able-bodied controls. SETTING: Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden. METHOD: Participants consisted of 20 persons with a complete SCL at the C5-C8 level (at least 1 year postinjury) and 20 matched, able-bodied controls. Breathing patterns and static lung volumes were measured using a body plethysmograph. RESULTS: Compared to the controls, breathing patterns at rest among the people with tetraplegia were characterised by a decreased tidal volume, stable respiratory rate and total cycle duration resulting in decreased mean inspiratory and expiratory flow, and alveolar ventilation. All volume and flow parameters increased except respiratory rate, which decreased during DB and PEP. During IR-PEP, tidal volume increased less compared to PEP, and combined with a decreased respiratory rate the alveolar ventilation was lower than during breathing at rest. The functional residual capacity increased during PEP and IR-PEP in people with tetraplegia. CONCLUSION: DB exercises with or without resistance during expiration or the whole breathing cycle affect the breathing pattern in persons with tetraplegia. DB was superior in increasing volumes and flow. PEP and IR-PEP increased FRC but IR-PEP decreased volumes and flows. However, large interindividual differences in the SCL group indicate the need for caution in generalising the results. SPONSORSHIP: This work was supported in part by grants from the Memorial Foundation of the Swedish Association of registered Physiotherapists and the Association of Cancer and Road Accident Victims.
PubMed ID
12714992 View in PubMed
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Changes in lung function of HIV-infected patients: a 4.5-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123634
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2012 Jul;32(4):288-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Ulrik Sloth Kristoffersen
Anne-Mette Lebech
Jann Mortensen
Jan Gerstoft
Henrik Gutte
Andreas Kjaer
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine & PET, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. ulriksk@sund.ku.dk
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2012 Jul;32(4):288-95
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Retroviral Agents - therapeutic use
Denmark
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forced expiratory volume
HIV Infections - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology - virology
Humans
Lung - physiopathology - virology
Lung Volume Measurements
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology - virology
Smoking - adverse effects
Time Factors
Vital Capacity
Abstract
To investigate the development of lung function in HIV-infected patients.
In a prospective cohort study, 88 HIV-infected patients had a lung function test performed and 63 patients (72%) had their LFT repeated with a median follow-up period of 4.4 years. Forty-eight per cent were smokers, and at the re-examination, 97% were on combination antiretroviral therapy.
Carbon monoxide diffusion capacity was reduced and decreased over time in both smokers and non-smokers. Alveolar volume decreased and forced vital capacity increased similarly in both smokers and non-smokers. No changes were observed in forced expiratory volume or peak flow, but smokers had reduced values compared with those of the non-smokers at both examinations. FEV1/FVC was reduced especially in smokers and declined in both smokers and non-smokers.
Carbon monoxide diffusion capacity is reduced in HIV-infected patients and seems to decline over time. Additionally, signs of obstructive lung disease are present in HIV-infected patients and seem to increase over time, although only modestly.
PubMed ID
22681606 View in PubMed
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Chromosome 17q21 gene variants are associated with asthma and exacerbations but not atopy in early childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91125
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2009 Feb 1;179(3):179-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2009
Author
Bisgaard Hans
Bønnelykke Klaus
Sleiman Patrick M A
Brasholt Martin
Chawes Bo
Kreiner-Møller Eskil
Stage Malene
Kim Cecilia
Tavendale Roger
Baty Florent
Pipper Christian Bressen
Palmer Colin N A
Hakonarsson Hakon
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Studies on Asthma in Childhood, The Danish Paediatrics Asthma Centre, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Gentofte Hospital, Ledreborg Alle 34, DK-2900 Gentofte, Copenhagen, Denmark. Bisgaard@copsac.dk
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2009 Feb 1;179(3):179-85
Date
Feb-1-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Airway Resistance - physiology
Asthma - epidemiology - genetics - physiopathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17 - genetics
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forced Expiratory Flow Rates
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Variation
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology - genetics - physiopathology
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Lung Volume Measurements
Male
Oximetry
Phenotype
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
RATIONALE: An asthma predisposition locus on chromosome 17q12-q21 has recently been replicated in different ethnic groups. OBJECTIVES: To characterize the asthma and atopy phenotypes in early childhood that associate with the 17q12-21 locus. METHODS: The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs7216389, was genotyped in 376 of 411 children from the Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC) birth cohort born to mothers with asthma together with 305 mothers and 224 fathers. Nineteen additional SNPs in the region were genotyped in the children. Investigator-diagnosed clinical endpoints were based on diary cards and clinic visits every 6 months and at acute symptoms from birth. Lung function, bronchial responsiveness, and sensitization were tested longitudinally from early infancy. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: rs7216389 was significantly associated with the development of wheeze (hazard ratio 1.64 [1.05-2.59], P value = 0.03), asthma (hazard ratio, 1.88 [1.15-3.07], P = 0.01), and acute severe exacerbations (hazard ratio 2.66 [1.58-4.48], P value = 0.0002). The effect on wheeze and asthma was observed for early onset but not late onset of disease. The increased risk of exacerbations persisted from 1 to 6 years of age (incidence ratio 2.48 [1.42-4.32], P value = 0.001), and increased bronchial responsiveness was present in infancy and at 4 years of age, but not at 6 years. In contrast, rs7216389 conferred no risk of eczema, rhinitis, or allergic sensitization. CONCLUSIONS: Variation at the chromosome 17q12-q21 locus was associated with approximately twofold increased risk of recurrent wheeze, asthma, asthma exacerbations, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness from early infancy to school age but without conferring risk of eczema, rhinitis, or allergic sensitization. These longitudinal clinical data show this locus to be an important genetic determinant of nonatopic asthma in children.
PubMed ID
19029000 View in PubMed
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74 records – page 1 of 8.