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Air pollution and lung cancer mortality in the vicinity of a nonferrous metal smelter in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18199
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Nov 10;107(3):448-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-2003
Author
Anna Bessö
Fredrik Nyberg
Göran Pershagen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. anna.besso@imm.ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Nov 10;107(3):448-52
Date
Nov-10-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To evaluate the importance of exposure to ambient air pollution for lung cancer risk, we conducted a case-control study in the vicinity of a nonferrous metal smelter. The smelter started operations in 1930 and had very high emissions during the early decades, particularly of arsenic and SO(2). Among subjects deceased 1961-1990 in the municipality where the smelter is located and who had not worked at the smelter, 209 male and 107 female lung cancer cases were identified and matched by sex and year of birth to 518 and 209 controls, respectively. Information on smoking habits, occupations and residences was collected by questionnaire to next-of-kin and from registry data. Living close to the smelter was associated with a relative risk (RR) for lung cancer of 1.38 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.89-2.14] among men, adjusted for smoking and occupational exposures. No clear difference in risk was detected for men deceased 1961-1979 compared to men deceased 1980-1990 (RR point estimates 1.42 and 1.29, respectively). There appeared to be an increased risk especially for men exposed in the beginning of the operations (RR = 1.51, 95% CI 0.90-2.54), in particular combined with exposure duration shorter than 20 years (RR = 2.52, 95% CI 0.89-7.11). For women, however, no overall increased risk for lung cancer was observed. Although not significant, our findings thus indicated an increased risk of lung cancer among men living close to the nonferrous smelter. This increase appeared to concern primarily men exposed during the early years of operations, when emissions were very high.
PubMed ID
14506746 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence, mortality and exposure-response among Swedish man-made vitreous fiber production workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23051
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1995 Oct;21(5):353-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
N. Plato
P. Westerholm
P. Gustavsson
T. Hemmingsson
C. Hogstedt
S. Krantz
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Health, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1995 Oct;21(5):353-61
Date
Oct-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Mineral Fibers - adverse effects
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Occupational Diseases - etiology - mortality
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Stomach Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE--The objective of this study was to provide an extended follow-up of workers in three Swedish plants producing man-made vitreous fibers (MMVF). METHOD--Mortality and cancer incidence was investigated among 3539 male and female workers, employed for at least one year before 1978. Mortality was followed from 1952 to 1990 and cancer incidence from 1958 to 1989. National and regional mortality and cancer incidence rates were used to calculate the expected numbers. RESULTS--Twenty-seven lung cancer deaths were observed compared with 23 expected (standardized mortality ratio 117, 95% confidence interval 81-176), based on regional mortality. With a latency time of 30 years, the lung cancer risk was significantly elevated, but not trend was found for the standardized mortality ratio with increasing duration of exposure to MMVF. The lung cancer and stomach cancer mortality was higher in the rock wool industry than in the fiber glass industry. Fiber exposure from 1938 to 1990 was estimated in the two rock wool plants by applying a model for historical fiber exposure estimation, specific for different job titles in the rock wool production industry. No relationship was found between individually cumulated rock wool fiber exposure and lung cancer or stomach cancer risk. CONCLUSIONS--The numbers of lung cancers and stomach cancer cases were low and did not therefore allow more general conclusions regarding the cancer hazard for exposed workers. A large European study in progress will probably allow more precise conclusions.
PubMed ID
8571091 View in PubMed
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Cancer mortality among European asphalt workers: an international epidemiological study. II. Exposure to bitumen fume and other agents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18720
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2003 Jan;43(1):28-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Paolo Boffetta
Igor Burstyn
Timo Partanen
Hans Kromhout
Ole Svane
Sverre Langård
Bengt Järvholm
Rainer Frentzel-Beyme
Timo Kauppinen
Isabelle Stücker
Judith Shaham
Dick Heederik
Wolfgang Ahrens
Ingvar A Bergdahl
Sylvie Cenée
Gilles Ferro
Pirjo Heikkilä
Mariëtte Hooiveld
Christoffer Johansen
Britt G Randem
Walter Schill
Author Affiliation
Unit of Environmental Cancer Epidemiology, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. boffetta@iarc.fr
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2003 Jan;43(1):28-39
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Hydrocarbons
Inhalation Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Male
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Occupational Diseases - etiology - mortality
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Abstract
BACKGROUND: An increased risk of lung cancers among asphalt workers has been suggested in epidemiological studies based on large scale statistical analyses. METHODS: In a multi-country study of 29,820 male workers employed in road paving, asphalt mixing and roofing, 32,245 ground and building construction workers and 17,757 other workers from Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Israel, the Netherlands, Norway, and Sweden, with mortality that was documented from 1953-2000. Exposures to bitumen fume, coal tar, 4-6 ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organic vapor, diesel exhaust, asbestos, and silica dust were assessed via a job-exposure matrix. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) based on national mortality rates, as well as relative risks (RRs) based on Poisson regression models were calculated. RESULTS: The SMR of lung cancer among workers exposed to bitumen fume (1.08, 95% CI 0.99-1.18) was comparable to that of non-exposed workers (SMR 1.05, 95% CI 0.92-1.19). In a sub-cohort of bitumen-exposed workers without exposure to coal tar, the SMR of lung cancer was 1.23 (95% CI 1.02-1.48). The analysis based on the semi-quantitative, matrix-based exposures in the whole cohort did not suggest an increased lung cancer risk following exposure to bitumen fume. However, in an analysis restricted to road pavers, based on quantitative estimate of bitumen fume exposure, a dose-response was suggested for average level of exposure, applying a 15-year lag, which was marginally reduced after adjustment for co-exposure to coal tar. The results for cancer of the head and neck were similar to those of lung cancer, although they were based on a smaller number of deaths. There was no clear suggestion of an association with bitumen fume for any other neoplasm. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the analysis by bitumen fume exposure do not allow us to conclude on the presence or absence of a causal link between exposure to bitumen fume and risk of cancer of the lung and the head and neck.
PubMed ID
12494419 View in PubMed
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Cancer mortality among man-made vitreous fiber production workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22108
Source
Epidemiology. 1997 May;8(3):259-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
P. Boffetta
R. Saracci
A. Andersen
P A Bertazzi
J. Chang-Claude
J. Cherrie
G. Ferro
R. Frentzel-Beyme
J. Hansen
J. Olsen
N. Plato
L. Teppo
P. Westerholm
P D Winter
C. Zocchetti
Author Affiliation
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
Source
Epidemiology. 1997 May;8(3):259-68
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Mineral Fibers - adverse effects
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Occupational Diseases - etiology - mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
We have updated the follow-up of cancer mortality for a cohort study of man-made vitreous fiber production workers from Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden, United Kingdom, Germany, and Italy, from 1982 to 1990. In the mortality analysis, 22,002 production workers contributed 489,551 person-years, during which there were 4,521 deaths. Workers with less than 1 year of employment had an increased mortality [standardized mortality ratio (SMR) = 1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.37-1.53]. Workers with 1 year or more of employment, contributing 65% of person-years, had an SMR of 1.05 (95% CI = 1.02-1.09). The SMR for lung cancer was 1.34 (95% CI = 1.08-1.63, 97 deaths) among rock/slag wool workers and 1.27 (95% CI = 1.07-1.50, 140 deaths) among glass wool workers. In the latter group, no increase was present when local mortality rates were used. Among rock/slag wool workers, the risk of lung cancer increased with time-since-first-employment and duration of employment. The trend in lung cancer mortality according to technologic phase at first employment was less marked than in the previous follow-up. We obtained similar results from a Poisson regression analysis limited to rock/slag wool workers. Five deaths from pleural mesothelioma were reported, which may not represent an excess. There was no apparent excess for other categories of neoplasm. Tobacco smoking and other factors linked to social class, as well as exposures in other industries, appear unlikely to explain the whole increase in lung cancer mortality among rock/slag wool workers. Limited data on other agents do not indicate an important role of asbestos, slag, or bitumen. These results are not sufficient to conclude that the increased lung cancer risk is the result of exposure to rock/slag wool; however, insofar as respirable fibers were an important component of the ambient pollution of the working environment, they may have contributed to the increased risk.
Notes
Comment In: Epidemiology. 1998 Mar;9(2):218-9; author reply 219-209504299
Comment In: Epidemiology. 1998 Mar;9(2):218; author reply 214-209504298
PubMed ID
9115020 View in PubMed
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Carcinoma of the lung in Ontario gold miners: possible aetiological factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225366
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1991 Dec;48(12):808-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1991
Author
R A Kusiak
J. Springer
A C Ritchie
J. Muller
Author Affiliation
Health and Safety Studies Unit, Ontario Ministry of Labour, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1991 Dec;48(12):808-17
Date
Dec-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - etiology - mortality
Arsenic - adverse effects
Canada
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung - etiology - mortality
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - etiology - mortality
Cohort Studies
Geological Phenomena
Geology
Gold
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Nickel
Occupational Diseases - etiology - mortality
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Radon - adverse effects
Smoking - adverse effects
Time Factors
Abstract
A cohort of 54,128 men who worked in Ontario mines was observed for mortality between 1955 and 1986. Most of these men worked in nickel, gold, or uranium mines; a few worked in silver, iron, lead/zinc, or other ore mines. If mortality that occurred after a man had started to mine uranium was excluded, an excess of carcinoma of the lung was found among the 13,603 Ontario gold miners in the study (standardised mortality ratio (SMR) 129, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 115-145) and in men who began to mine nickel before 1936 (SMR 141, 95% CI 105-184). The excess mortality from lung cancer in the gold miners was confined to men who began gold mining before 1946. No increase in the mortality from carcinoma of the lung was evident in men who began mining gold after the end of 1945, in men who began mining nickel after 1936, or in men who mined ores other than gold, nickel, and uranium. In the gold mines each year of employment before the end of 1945 was associated with a 6.5% increase in mortality from lung cancer 20 or more years after the miner began working the mines (95% CI 1.6-11.4%); each year of employment before the end of 1945 in mines in which the host rock contained 0.1% arsenic was associated with a 3.1% increase in lung cancer 20 years or more after exposure began (95% CI 1.1-5.1%); and each working level month of exposure to radon decay products was associated with a 1.2% increase in mortality from lung cancer five or more years after exposure began (95% CI 0.02-2.4%). A comparison of two models shows that the excess of lung cancer mortality in Ontario gold miners is associated with exposure to high dust concentrations before 1946, with exposure to arsenic before 1946, and with exposure to radon decay products. No association between the increased incidence of carcinoma of the lung in Ontario gold miners and exposure to mineral fibre could be detected. It is concluded that the excess of carcinoma of the lung in Ontario gold miners is probably due to exposure to arsenic and radon decay products.
Notes
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PubMed ID
1663386 View in PubMed
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Cause-specific mortality in Finnish ferrochromium and stainless steel production workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285596
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2016 Apr;66(3):241-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
M. Huvinen
E. Pukkala
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2016 Apr;66(3):241-6
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cause of Death
Chromium Alloys - adverse effects
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Metallurgy
Mining
Occupational Diseases - etiology - mortality
Occupational Exposure - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Respiration Disorders - chemically induced - mortality
Risk factors
Stainless Steel - adverse effects
Wounds and Injuries - etiology - mortality
Abstract
Although stainless steel has been produced for more than a hundred years, exposure-related mortality data for production workers are limited.
To describe cause-specific mortality in Finnish ferrochromium and stainless steel workers.
We studied Finnish stainless steel production chain workers employed between 1967 and 2004, from chromite mining to cold rolling of stainless steel, divided into sub-cohorts by production units with specific exposure patterns. We obtained causes of death for the years 1971-2012 from Statistics Finland. We calculated standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) as ratios of observed and expected numbers of deaths based on population mortality rates of the same region.
Among 8088 workers studied, overall mortality was significantly decreased (SMR 0.77; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.70-0.84), largely due to low mortality from diseases of the circulatory system (SMR 0.71; 95% CI 0.61-0.81). In chromite mine, stainless steel melting shop and metallurgical laboratory workers, the SMR for circulatory disease was below 0.4 (SMR 0.33; 95% CI 0.07-0.95, SMR 0.22; 95% CI 0.05-0.65 and SMR 0.16; 95% CI 0.00-0.90, respectively). Mortality from accidents (SMR 0.84; 95% CI 0.67-1.04) and suicides (SMR 0.72; 95% CI 0.56-0.91) was also lower than in the reference population.
Working in the Finnish ferrochromium and stainless steel industry appears not to be associated with increased mortality.
Notes
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Comment In: Arch Environ Occup Health. 2016 Jul 3;71(4):187-827230506
PubMed ID
26655692 View in PubMed
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Chrysotile fibre concentration and lung cancer mortality: a preliminary report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246325
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1980;(30):811-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
J C McDonald
G W Gibbs
F D Liddell
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1980;(30):811-7
Date
1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Asbestos - adverse effects - analysis
Dust - analysis
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Male
Occupational Diseases - etiology - mortality
Quebec
Risk
Smoking
Abstract
After checking on the accuracy of work histories and estimating prevailing fibre concentrations by relevant time and place, all 244 deaths from lung cancer (ICD 162-164) in the Quebec mortality cohort were compared with internal controls matched for date of birth, mining area and smoking habit. Further studies of other causes of death and of lung cancer with controls unmatched for smoking are in progress. In the meantime, we consider that a useful estimate of lung cancer risks is given by the equation: RR = 1 + 0.00038 (+/- 0.00013) fibres/ ml.yr.
PubMed ID
7228336 View in PubMed
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74 records – page 1 of 8.