Skip header and navigation

Refine By

65 records – page 1 of 7.

[Age-specific incidence of lung cancer in Sweden. Trends during the period 1959-1966]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature28377
Source
Lakartidningen. 1971 Sep 15;68(38):4229-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1971

The alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene lung cancer prevention study: design, methods, participant characteristics, and compliance. The ATBC Cancer Prevention Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219137
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 1994 Jan;4(1):1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1994
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 1994 Jan;4(1):1-10
Date
Jan-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjuvants, Immunologic - therapeutic use
Aged
Carotenoids - therapeutic use
Clinical Protocols
Double-Blind Method
Drug Monitoring
Drug Therapy, Combination
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Population Surveillance
Primary prevention - methods
Research Design
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Vitamin E - therapeutic use
beta Carotene
Abstract
The Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene (ATBC) Lung Cancer Prevention Study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2 x 2 factorial design, primary prevention trial testing the hypothesis that alpha-tocopherol (50 mg/day) and beta-carotene (20 mg/day) supplements reduce the incidence of lung cancer and possibly other cancers. Total and disease-specific mortality and incidence of various diseases and symptoms were monitored for safety. Between 1985 and 1993, 29,133 eligible male smokers aged 50 to 69 years at entry were randomized to receive daily active supplements or placebo capsules for 5 to 8 years (median 6.1 years), accumulating 169,751 follow-up years. This report describes the study design, methods, and protocol as well as the baseline characteristics and capsule compliance of the participants. The ATBC Study is the largest lung cancer chemoprevention trial conducted to date.
Notes
Comment In: Ann Epidemiol. 1994 Jan;4(1):758205274
PubMed ID
8205268 View in PubMed
Less detail

Atmospheric air pollution and the health of the population in some industrial cities of Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227330
Source
Public Health Rev. 1991-1992;19(1-4):83-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
B A Revich
Author Affiliation
Center of Demography and Human Ecology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow.
Source
Public Health Rev. 1991-1992;19(1-4):83-91
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced - epidemiology
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Lung Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Male
Population Surveillance
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
Atmospheric air in industrial cities of the USSR contains high concentrations of a wide range of toxicants, including benz(a)pyrene and heavy metals. To assess the impact of polluted air on public health a 5-level scale of health effects proposed by WHO experts and modified by the author was used. The "extremely hazardous" level of pollution characteristic of cities with metallurgic and chemical industries is described most specifically. An ecological taxonomy for cities of various industrial types is worked out. The latter is based on the results of interrelated studies of environmental pollution in cities and changes in public health characteristics.
PubMed ID
1844284 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bone metastasis, skeletal-related events, and mortality in lung cancer patients: a Danish population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264865
Source
Lung Cancer. 2014 Nov;86(2):247-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Karynsa Cetin
Christian Fynbo Christiansen
Jacob Bonde Jacobsen
Mette Nørgaard
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Source
Lung Cancer. 2014 Nov;86(2):247-54
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - secondary
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Registries
Young Adult
Abstract
To estimate the incidence rate of bone metastasis and subsequent skeletal-related events (SREs) (radiation to bone, spinal cord compression, fracture, and surgery to bone) in lung cancer patients and to quantify their impact on mortality.
We conducted a nationwide cohort study of patients diagnosed with lung cancer between 1999 and 2010 in Denmark. We computed the cumulative incidence (%) of bone metastasis and subsequent SREs (treating death as a competing risk) and corresponding incidence rates (per 1000 person-years). Survival was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method for three dynamic lung cancer patient cohorts-no bone metastasis; bone metastasis without SREs; and bone metastasis with SREs. Based on a Cox proportional hazards model, we computed mortality rate ratios (MRRs) comparing mortality rates between these patient cohorts, adjusting for age, comorbidity, stage, and histology. Analyses were conducted for the lung cancer patient cohort overall and by histologic subtype.
We identified 29,720 patients with incident lung cancer (median follow-up: 7.3 months). The 1-year cumulative incidence of bone metastasis was 5.9%, and the 1-year cumulative incidence of subsequent SREs was 55.0%. The incidence of bone metastasis and SREs was higher in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) versus SCLC. One-year survival was 37.4% in patients with no bone metastasis; 12.1% in patients with bone metastasis without SREs; and 5.1% in patients with both bone metastasis and SREs. When mortality rates between patients with bone metastasis with and without an SRE were compared, 2-month mortality rates were similar, but the >2-month adjusted MRR was 2.0 (95% confidence interval: 1.7-2.2).
Bone metastases predict a poor prognosis in lung cancer patients. The majority of lung cancer patients with bone metastasis will also experience an SRE, which may further increase the rate of mortality.
PubMed ID
25240518 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer incidence among male salaried employees at a smeltery in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24177
Source
Acta Oncol. 1993;32(1):9-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
A. Sandström
S. Wall
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Health Care Research, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1993;32(1):9-14
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arsenic - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Copper
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Exposure
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
This study focuses on mortality and cancer incidence among the male salaried employees at a copper smeltery in northern Sweden, where previously an increased lung cancer risk had been demonstrated among blue-collar workers, with all likelihood due to arsenic exposure. During the period 1928-1979 there has been 1,255 male salaried employees and 6,334 male blue-collar workers. Three cohorts were formed; those who had worked only as salaried employees, those who had worked only as blue-collar workers and those had worked in both job categories. The mortality among the entire group of salaried employees was comparatively lower than that of Sweden as a whole. The incidence of lung cancer was highest among those who had worked in both job categories, most of them former blue-collar workers. The trends in lung cancer incidence among the blue-collar workers along and among those who had had both types of jobs showed the same pattern, with a peak in the 1970s. The decrease in this trend started earlier among the salaried employees. When job category and employment cohort were analyzed together the highest risk was confirmed for those having been employed in both job categories.
PubMed ID
8466772 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer incidence and mortality among Finnish asbestos sprayers and in asbestosis and silicosis patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208380
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1997 Jun;31(6):693-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
P. Oksa
E. Pukkala
A. Karjalainen
A. Ojajärvi
M S Huuskonen
Author Affiliation
Tampere Regional Institute of Occupational Health, Finland. Panu.Oksa@occuphealth.fi
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1997 Jun;31(6):693-8
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asbestosis - mortality
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology - mortality
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Respiratory Tract Diseases - mortality
Silicosis - mortality
Vascular Diseases - mortality
Abstract
Cohorts of Finnish asbestos sprayers and of asbestosis and silicosis patients were followed for cancer with the aid of the Finnish Cancer Registry in the period 1967-1994. Compared with the cancer incidence of the total Finnish population, asbestos sprayers had an increased risk for total cancer (standardized incidence ratio [SIR] 6.7, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 4.2-10); lung cancer (SIR 17.95% CI 8.2-31); and mesothelioma (SIR 263, 95% CI 85-614). The SIR of the asbestosis patients was 3.7 (95% CI 2.8-5.0) for all sites, 10 (95% CI 6.9-14) for lung cancer, and 65 (95% CI 13-188) for mesothelioma. The silicosis patients also had significantly high SIR values for all sites (1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.1) and lung cancer (2.7, 95% CI 1.5-4.5). The values for the SIR and the standardized mortality ratio for all sites and lung cancer were very similar, and therefore it seems that both are reliable indicators of the occurrence of occupational cancer. It was concluded that pneumoconioses patients and asbestos-exposed workers have a markedly elevated risk for cancer. Asbestos-induced occupational cancers are not only diseases of the elderly, since the relative risk is high also for middle-aged people.
PubMed ID
9131223 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer: incidence, hospitalizations and deaths in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231963
Source
Health Rep. 1989;1(1):51-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
A. Brancker
Source
Health Rep. 1989;1(1):51-67
Date
1989
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - surgery
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
This article brings together three Statistics Canada Health Division data series dealing with cancer incidence, mortality and the use of hospitals in cancer care. An estimated one in three Canadians will develop some form of cancer during his or her lifetime. In 1987, only cardiovascular disease (CVD) accounted for more deaths. And while the risk of dying from other major causes of death such as CVD and accidents and violence has been decreasing in the last two decades, cancer rates have increased. However, most of this increase can be attributed to the aging of Canada's population, and by a near doubling of lung cancer death rates. The most common cancers for men are of the lung prostate and colo-rectum. For women, breast cancer ranks first. Overall cancer incidence increased from 1971 to 1984 for all age groups except women aged 35-44, but this may partly reflect improved cancer detection and registration techniques. Death rates for people under age 45 have fallen substantially despite the higher incidence; this reflects progress in treating some cancers, particularly in children. Survival rates differ for the various forms of cancer. Among common cancers, those of the breast, bladder, prostate and uterus have high survival rates, while cancers of the lung, pancreas, stomach and brain have low survival rates. Although cancer was responsible for only 8% of all days of hospital care in 1984, the average length of stay for cancer was longer than for other causes: 18 days compared to between 11 and 12.
PubMed ID
2491352 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer morbidity in Swedish asphalt workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18718
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2003 Jan;43(1):104-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Ingvar A Bergdahl
Bengt Järvholm
Author Affiliation
Occupational Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden. ingvar.bergdahl@envmed.umu.se
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2003 Jan;43(1):104-8
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Humans
Hydrocarbons
Incidence
Inhalation Exposure
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Exposure
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Some studies have indicated an increased risk of lung cancer among asphalt workers. This study investigates the risk of lung cancer in Swedish asphalt workers. METHODS: A cohort of 6,150 asphalt workers, mainly employed in road construction, was compared to the general population, and to a reference group of construction workers not exposed to asphalt fumes. The exposure to polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) at paving in Sweden during the 1980s and 1990s were estimated to be in the order of one or a few micrograms per cubic meter, but must have been higher in earlier years. RESULTS: Thirty-two lung cancer cases were observed among asphalt workers. The relative risk (SIR) and 95% confidence intervals were 0.98 (0.67-1.39). The corresponding relative risk, as compared to a group of construction workers and adjusted for smoking habits, was 1.03 (0.70-1.45). We found no increased risk for other cancers investigated or death in other lung diseases. CONCLUSIONS: Asphalt workers do not have any increased lung cancer risk from exposure to fumes and gases from asphalt at the exposure levels that occurred in Sweden during the 1960s and 1970s.
PubMed ID
12494427 View in PubMed
Less detail

Carcinoma of the lung in Iceland: 1931-1974.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26883
Source
Environ Res. 1983 Dec;32(2):414-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1983
Author
H. Thorarinsson
J. Hallgrímsson
Source
Environ Res. 1983 Dec;32(2):414-31
Date
Dec-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology
Adult
Aged
Carcinoma - epidemiology - mortality - surgery
Carcinoma, Small Cell - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Iceland
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
During the period 1931-1974, 464 cases of primary lung cancer were diagnosed in Iceland. Only 34 cases were recorded from 1931-1954, but during the next two decades 156 cases and 274 cases were reported, a total of 430 cases which are analyzed in this paper. There is a preponderance of small cell anaplastic carcinoma 33.4% in this series. Epidermoid or squamous cell carcinoma was found in only 24.7% of cases and large cell anaplastic carcinoma in 15.4%. During the period 1955-1974, 143 major surgical procedures were performed for lung cancer in this country, 68 exploratory thoracotomies and 75 resections. Of the resections 58.7% were pneumonectomies. There were 3 surgical deaths in the resected series, for a mortality of 4%. Pneumonectomy carried a mortality of 6.8%, but lobectomies or segmental resections carried no mortality. In the resected series the absolute 5-year survival rate is 29.3%. Patients with epidermoid lesions have the most favorable prognosis. There is a definite correlation between tobacco consumption or cigarette smoking in Iceland and the rising incidence of lung carcinoma.
PubMed ID
6315392 View in PubMed
Less detail

65 records – page 1 of 7.