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Adolescent smoking and trends in lung cancer incidence among young adults in Norway 1954-1998.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17901
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2004 Feb;15(1):27-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Trond-Eirik Strand
Columbo Malayeri
Petri K J Eskonsipo
Tom K Grimsrud
Jarle Norstein
Tom Grotmol
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2004 Feb;15(1):27-33
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the national trends in lung cancer incidence among young adults and the relationship to adolescent smoking. METHODS: Between 1954 and 1998, a total of 1108 non-carcinoid lung cancers were reported to the Cancer Registry of Norway in individuals aged 20-44 years. Temporal variations were studied in age and sex specific rates, in age-adjusted rates, and by means of age-period-cohort modelling. The association between cancer incidence and smoking prevalence was evaluated. RESULTS: The lung cancer incidence rate among women aged 40-44 in Norway continued to increase into the most recent time interval (1994-1998) whereas the rate among men aged 40-44 was essentially constant after 1970. Consequently, lung cancer incidence rates converged among male and female young adults. Lung cancer incidence rates at age 40-44 were highly correlated with smoking prevalence at age 15-19 in males ( r = 0.88) and females ( r = 0.82) within the same birth cohort. CONCLUSIONS: The lung cancer incidence rate in young Norwegian women now equals that of men. The risk at age 40-44 was closely associated with teenage smoking, indicating that duration and age of onset are important.
PubMed ID
14970732 View in PubMed
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Age at occupational exposure to combustion products and lung cancer risk among men in Stockholm, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277350
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2016 Feb;89(2):271-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Matteo Bottai
Jenny Selander
Göran Pershagen
Per Gustavsson
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2016 Feb;89(2):271-5
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - toxicity
Case-Control Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Particulate Matter - toxicity
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - toxicity
Radon - toxicity
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Occupational exposure to combustion products rich in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and particles is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. This study aimed to evaluate whether the risk depended on the age at which the individuals were exposed.
Data from 1042 lung cancer cases and 2364 frequency-matched population controls selected from all men aged 40-75 years residing in Stockholm County, Sweden, at any time between 1985 and 1990, included detailed questionnaire information on occupational, residential, and smoking history. Occupational exposures were assessed by an occupational hygienist, and exposure to air pollution from road traffic was estimated based on dispersion models.
We found that individuals exposed to combustion products in their twenties were at higher risk than those never exposed (adjusted OR = 1.46; 95% CI 1.02, 2.10). The association was still evident after adjusting for a number of potential confounders, including lifetime cumulative exposure and latency. No clear association was found in those exposed at older ages.
Exposure to combustion products at a young age was associated with elevated risk of lung cancer. Exposure-reduction programs should be aware of the susceptibility of the younger employees.
PubMed ID
26126736 View in PubMed
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Air pollution from traffic and risk for lung cancer in three Danish cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99386
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010 May;19(5):1284-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Helle Bak
Mette Sørensen
Steen Solvang Jensen
Matthias Ketzel
Martin Hvidberg
Peter Schnohr
Anne Tjønneland
Kim Overvad
Steffen Loft
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. ole@cancer.dk
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010 May;19(5):1284-91
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Vehicle Emissions
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Air pollution is suspected to cause lung cancer. The purpose was to investigate whether the concentration of nitrogen oxides (NOx) at the residence, used as an indicator of air pollution from traffic, is associated with risk for lung cancer. METHODS: We identified 679 lung cancer cases in the Danish Cancer Registry from the members of three prospective cohorts and selected a comparison group of 3,481 persons from the same cohorts in a case-cohort design. Residential addresses from January 1, 1971, were traced in the Central Population Registry. The NOx concentration at each address was calculated by dispersion models, and the time-weighted average concentration for all addresses was calculated for each person. We used Cox models to estimate incidence rate ratios after adjustment for smoking (status, duration, and intensity), educational level, body mass index, and alcohol consumption. RESULTS: The incidence rate ratios for lung cancer were 1.30 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.07-1.57] and 1.45 (95% CI, 1.12-1.88) for NOx concentrations of 30 to 72 and >72 microg/m3, respectively, when compared with
PubMed ID
20447920 View in PubMed
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Alcohol, beer and lung cancer--a meaningful relationship?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12807
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1984 Jun;13(2):240-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1984
Author
J D Potter
A J McMichael
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1984 Jun;13(2):240-2
Date
Jun-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism - complications
Beer - adverse effects
Canada
Denmark
Female
Humans
Ireland
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Male
United States
Abstract
The epidemiological evidence relating alcohol consumption and lung cancer is reviewed. Four correlation studies have shown a relationship between alcohol, particularly beer, consumption and lung cancer. Beer consumption was a risk factor in one case-control study. Eight out of ten prospective studies show alcoholics and high alcohol consumers to be at greater risk of lung cancer. Not all of the increased risk in these studies is explainable in terms of confounding by tobacco consumption. There is some animal evidence which supports the effects of alcohol on the likelihood of developing lung cancer.
PubMed ID
6376387 View in PubMed
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Alcohol intake and the risk of lung cancer: influence of type of alcoholic beverage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10727
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1999 Mar 1;149(5):463-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-1999
Author
E. Prescott
M. Grønbaek
U. Becker
T I Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Centre for Prospective Population Studies, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre at the Institute of Preventive Medicine, H:S Kommunehospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1999 Mar 1;149(5):463-70
Date
Mar-1-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Beer - adverse effects
Comparative Study
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Denmark - epidemiology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Wine
Abstract
Alcohol consumption has been associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, but the antioxidants in wine may, in theory, provide protection. This association was studied in 28,160 men and women subjects from three prospective studies conducted in 1964-1992 in Copenhagen, Denmark. After adjustment for age, smoking, and education, a low to moderate alcohol intake (1-20 drinks per week) was not associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. Men who consumed 21-41 and more than 41 drinks per week had relative risks of 1.23 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.88-1.74) and 1.57 (95% CI 1.06-2.33), respectively. The risk of lung cancer differed according to the type of alcohol consumed: After abstainers were excluded, drinkers of 1-13 and more than 13 glasses of wine per week had relative risks of 0.78 (95% CI 0.63-0.97) and 0.44 (95% CI 0.22-0.86), respectively, as compared with nondrinkers of wine (p for trend = 0.002). Corresponding relative risks for beer intake were 1.09 (95% CI 0.83-1.43) and 1.36 (95% CI 1.02-1.82), respectively (p for trend = 0.01); for spirits, they were 1.21 (95% CI 0.97-1.50) and 1.46 (95% CI 0.99-2.14), respectively (p for trend = 0.02). In women, the ability to detect associations with high alcohol intake and type of beverage was limited because of a limited range of alcohol intake. The authors concluded that in men, a high consumption of beer and spirits is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, whereas wine intake may protect against the development of lung cancer.
PubMed ID
10067906 View in PubMed
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Alcoholism and cancer risk: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24357
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1992 Sep;3(5):419-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1992
Author
H O Adami
J K McLaughlin
A W Hsing
A. Wolk
A. Ekbom
L. Holmberg
I. Persson
Author Affiliation
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1992 Sep;3(5):419-25
Date
Sep-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Laryngeal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The incidence of cancer was studied in a population-based cohort of 9,353 individuals (8,340 men and 1,013 women) with a discharge diagnosis of alcoholism in 1965-83, followed up for 19 years (mean 7.7). After exclusion of cancers in the first year of follow-up, 491 cancers were observed cf 343.2 expected through 1984 (standardized incidence ratio [SIR] = 1.4, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] = 1.3-1.6). A similar excess risk of cancer was seen among men (SIR = 1.4, CI = 1.3-1.6) and among women (SIR = 1.5, CI = 1.1-2.0). We observed the established associations with cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx (SIR = 4.1, CI = 2.9-5.7), esophagus (SIR = 6.8, CI = 4.5-9.9), larynx (SIR = 3.3, CI = 1.7-6.0), and lung (SIR = 2.1, CI = 1.7-2.6), although confounding by smoking likely increased these risk estimates. While there was evidence of increased risk for pancreatic cancer (SIR = 1.5, CI = 0.9-2.3), alcoholism did not elevate the incidence of cancer of the stomach (SIR = 0.9, CI = 6-1.4), large bowel (SIR = 1.1, CI = 0.8-1.5), prostate (SIR = 1.0, CI = 0.8-1.3), urinary bladder (SIR = 1.0, CI = 0.6-1.5), or of malignant melanoma (SIR = 0.9, CI = 0.3-1.9). Among women, the number of breast cancers observed was close to expected (SIR = 1.2, CI = 0.6-2.2), although a significant excess number of cervical cancers occurred (SIR = 4.2, CI = 1.5-9.1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1525322 View in PubMed
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The Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217767
Source
Nutr Rev. 1994 Jul;52(7):242-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
J. Blumberg
G. Block
Author Affiliation
USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, MA.
Source
Nutr Rev. 1994 Jul;52(7):242-5
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Carotenoids - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Double-Blind Method
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Smoking - adverse effects
Vitamin E - therapeutic use
beta Carotene
Abstract
The U.S. National Cancer Institute and the Finnish National Public Institute jointly sponsored a large double-blind, placebo-controlled primary-prevention trial to examine the effects of vitamin E and beta-carotene supplementation on reducing the incidence of lung cancers in male smokers, ages 50-69 years. Supplementation did not result in a significant reduction in lung cancer, and a higher incidence of lung cancer was observed in the group receiving beta-carotene. These results should be examined within the context of the population studied before they are cited as definitive.
PubMed ID
8090376 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A multifactor assessment of effects of technogenic pollution on the occurrence of lung cancer in the population of an industrial town].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258114
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 May-Jun;(3):26-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
V L Lezhnin
V S Kazantsev
E V Polzik
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 May-Jun;(3):26-30
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carcinogens, Environmental - adverse effects
Copper - chemistry
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Metallurgy
Risk Assessment - methods
Russia - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The study was devoted to the evaluation of technogenic geochemical pollution of the residential area of an industrial town and its effects on lung cancer incidence in the population living under severe exposure to emissions of a copper smelter plant. For mathematical treatment of epidemiologic data there were used methods of a system multifactor analysis based on pattern recognition principles. The result of the long-term operation of the copper smelter plant was established to become the intensive technogenic pollution of environment with carcinogenic substances. The contribution of environmental contamination in the lung cancer incidence of the population exposed to industrial emissions of the copper smelter was shown to be about 10%.
PubMed ID
25306695 View in PubMed
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Analysis of multiple exposures: an empirical comparison of results from conventional and semi-bayes modeling strategies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146685
Source
Epidemiology. 2010 Jan;21(1):144-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Franco Momoli
Michal Abrahamowicz
Marie-Elise Parent
Dan Krewski
Jack Siemiatycki
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
Source
Epidemiology. 2010 Jan;21(1):144-51
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bayes Theorem
Empirical Research
Environmental Exposure
Epidemiology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Occupational Exposure
Odds Ratio
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
Analysts of epidemiologic data often contend with the problem of estimating the independent effects of many correlated exposures. General approaches include assessing each exposure separately, adjusting for some subset of other exposures, or assessing all exposures simultaneously in a single model such as semi-Bayes modeling. The optimal strategy remains uncertain, and it is unclear to what extent different reasonable approaches influence findings. We provide an empirical comparison of results from several modeling strategies.
In an occupational case-control study of lung cancer with 184 exposure substances, we implemented 6 modeling strategies to estimate odds ratios for each exposure-cancer association. These included one-exposure-at-a-time models with various confounder selection criteria (such as a priori selection or a change-in-the-estimate criterion) and semi-Bayes models, one version of which integrated information on previous evidence and chemical properties.
While distributions of odds ratios were broadly similar across the 6 analytic strategies, there were some differences in point estimates and in substances manifesting statistically significant odds ratios, particularly between strategies with few or no occupational covariates and those with many. Semi-Bayes models produced fewer statistically significant odds ratios than other methods. A simple semi-Bayes model that shrank all the 184 estimates to a common mean yielded nearly identical results to one that integrated considerable prior information.
Different modeling strategies can lead to different results. Considering the conceptual and pragmatic difficulties of identifying confounders, these results suggest that it would be unwise to place uncritical reliance on any single strategy.
PubMed ID
20010218 View in PubMed
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Analysis of the exposure-response relationship for mesothelioma among asbestos-cement factory workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225183
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1991 Dec 31;643:85-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-31-1991

289 records – page 1 of 29.