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Admissions to a radiation oncology inpatient service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208233
Source
Cancer Prev Control. 1997 Jun;1(2):116-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
C R Hayter
W J Mackillop
Author Affiliation
Radiation Oncology Research Unit, Queen's University, Kingston General Hospital, Ont. chayter@octrf.on.ca
Source
Cancer Prev Control. 1997 Jun;1(2):116-21
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Bed Occupancy - statistics & numerical data
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - radiotherapy
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology
Comprehensive Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Databases as Topic
Endocrine System Diseases - epidemiology
Female
Genital Neoplasms, Female - epidemiology - radiotherapy
Hospital Information Systems
Hospital Units - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - radiotherapy
Male
Nervous System Diseases - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Radiation Oncology - statistics & numerical data
Survival Rate
Urogenital Neoplasms - epidemiology - radiotherapy
Abstract
Although the care of inpatients is an important aspect of radiation oncology practice in many countries, it has never been studied in detail. The goal of this study was to describe the admissions to a radiation oncology inpatient service over a 1-year period with respect to patient characteristics, primary malignancies, common nonmalignant diagnoses, use of radiotherapy and outcome of admission.
Using computerized hospital databases, we analysed the utilization of 11 radiation oncology beds in a 424-bed teaching hospital from March 31, 1991, to April 1, 1992.
There were 342 admissions of 277 patients. The median age was 66.5 years; the male:female ratio was 1:1. The commonest primary neoplastic diagnoses were lung (42%), gynecological (15%), genitourinary (14%) and breast (8%) cancers. Only 17% of the patients had cancer as the sole diagnosis; most patients had multiple medical diagnoses. Infections (22%), neurological (20%), cardiovascular (13%) and endocrine (9%) conditions were the commonest. Mean length of stay was 11.25 days. Most of the admissions (71%) resulted in discharge to the patient's home; few patients (15%) died. Only half of admissions involved radiotherapy, indicating that the focus of patient care was the medical treatment of cancer complications or other active medical problems.
These data show that radiation oncology inpatients have complicated medical problems, and they support the training of radiation oncologists in the comprehensive medical care of patients.
PubMed ID
9765733 View in PubMed
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Adolescent smoking and trends in lung cancer incidence among young adults in Norway 1954-1998.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17901
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2004 Feb;15(1):27-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Trond-Eirik Strand
Columbo Malayeri
Petri K J Eskonsipo
Tom K Grimsrud
Jarle Norstein
Tom Grotmol
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2004 Feb;15(1):27-33
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the national trends in lung cancer incidence among young adults and the relationship to adolescent smoking. METHODS: Between 1954 and 1998, a total of 1108 non-carcinoid lung cancers were reported to the Cancer Registry of Norway in individuals aged 20-44 years. Temporal variations were studied in age and sex specific rates, in age-adjusted rates, and by means of age-period-cohort modelling. The association between cancer incidence and smoking prevalence was evaluated. RESULTS: The lung cancer incidence rate among women aged 40-44 in Norway continued to increase into the most recent time interval (1994-1998) whereas the rate among men aged 40-44 was essentially constant after 1970. Consequently, lung cancer incidence rates converged among male and female young adults. Lung cancer incidence rates at age 40-44 were highly correlated with smoking prevalence at age 15-19 in males ( r = 0.88) and females ( r = 0.82) within the same birth cohort. CONCLUSIONS: The lung cancer incidence rate in young Norwegian women now equals that of men. The risk at age 40-44 was closely associated with teenage smoking, indicating that duration and age of onset are important.
PubMed ID
14970732 View in PubMed
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Age- and time-dependent changes in cancer incidence among immigrants to Sweden: colorectal, lung, breast and prostate cancers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129906
Source
Int J Cancer. 2012 Jul 15;131(2):E122-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2012
Author
Seyed Mohsen Mousavi
Mahdi Fallah
Kristina Sundquist
Kari Hemminki
Author Affiliation
Division of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, DKFZ, Heidelberg, Germany. m.mousavi@dkfz.de
Source
Int J Cancer. 2012 Jul 15;131(2):E122-8
Date
Jul-15-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine the role of gender, age at immigration and length of stay on incidence trends of common cancers, we studied risk of colorectal, lung, breast and prostate cancers in immigrants to Sweden from 1958 to 2008. The nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database was used to calculate standardized incidence ratios for common cancers among immigrants compared to Swedes. Immigrants were classified into "high-risk" countries when their risk was increased, into "low-risk" when their risk was decreased and into "other" when their risk was nonsignificant. Among those who immigrated at younger age (
PubMed ID
22052616 View in PubMed
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Age at occupational exposure to combustion products and lung cancer risk among men in Stockholm, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277350
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2016 Feb;89(2):271-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Matteo Bottai
Jenny Selander
Göran Pershagen
Per Gustavsson
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2016 Feb;89(2):271-5
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - toxicity
Case-Control Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Particulate Matter - toxicity
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - toxicity
Radon - toxicity
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Occupational exposure to combustion products rich in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and particles is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. This study aimed to evaluate whether the risk depended on the age at which the individuals were exposed.
Data from 1042 lung cancer cases and 2364 frequency-matched population controls selected from all men aged 40-75 years residing in Stockholm County, Sweden, at any time between 1985 and 1990, included detailed questionnaire information on occupational, residential, and smoking history. Occupational exposures were assessed by an occupational hygienist, and exposure to air pollution from road traffic was estimated based on dispersion models.
We found that individuals exposed to combustion products in their twenties were at higher risk than those never exposed (adjusted OR = 1.46; 95% CI 1.02, 2.10). The association was still evident after adjusting for a number of potential confounders, including lifetime cumulative exposure and latency. No clear association was found in those exposed at older ages.
Exposure to combustion products at a young age was associated with elevated risk of lung cancer. Exposure-reduction programs should be aware of the susceptibility of the younger employees.
PubMed ID
26126736 View in PubMed
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[Age-specific incidence of lung cancer in Sweden. Trends during the period 1959-1966]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature28377
Source
Lakartidningen. 1971 Sep 15;68(38):4229-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1971

Air pollution from traffic and risk for lung cancer in three Danish cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99386
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010 May;19(5):1284-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Helle Bak
Mette Sørensen
Steen Solvang Jensen
Matthias Ketzel
Martin Hvidberg
Peter Schnohr
Anne Tjønneland
Kim Overvad
Steffen Loft
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. ole@cancer.dk
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010 May;19(5):1284-91
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Vehicle Emissions
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Air pollution is suspected to cause lung cancer. The purpose was to investigate whether the concentration of nitrogen oxides (NOx) at the residence, used as an indicator of air pollution from traffic, is associated with risk for lung cancer. METHODS: We identified 679 lung cancer cases in the Danish Cancer Registry from the members of three prospective cohorts and selected a comparison group of 3,481 persons from the same cohorts in a case-cohort design. Residential addresses from January 1, 1971, were traced in the Central Population Registry. The NOx concentration at each address was calculated by dispersion models, and the time-weighted average concentration for all addresses was calculated for each person. We used Cox models to estimate incidence rate ratios after adjustment for smoking (status, duration, and intensity), educational level, body mass index, and alcohol consumption. RESULTS: The incidence rate ratios for lung cancer were 1.30 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.07-1.57] and 1.45 (95% CI, 1.12-1.88) for NOx concentrations of 30 to 72 and >72 microg/m3, respectively, when compared with
PubMed ID
20447920 View in PubMed
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Alaska Native cancer update: incidence rates 1989-1993.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4041
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1996 Sep;5(9):749-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
A P Lanier
J J Kelly
B. Smith
A P Harpster
H. Tanttila
C. Amadon
D. Beckworth
C. Key
A M Davidson
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Medical Center, United States Public Health Service, United States Department of Health and Human Services, Anchorage 99501, USA.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1996 Sep;5(9):749-51
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Comparative Study
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
SEER Program
Sex Factors
United States - epidemiology
Uterine Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
Five-year average annual age-adjusted cancer incidence rates for Alaska Natives (Eskimos, Indians, and Aleuts) for the most recent period (1989-1993) are compared to rates of 20 years earlier. Rates for all cancers combined increased 28 and 25% in men and women, respectively, during the 25-year interval. Increases were seen in men in cancers of the lung, prostate, and colon and in women for cancers of the lung, breast, and corpus uteri. Rates are also compared to data from the the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program for United States whites. Rates for all cancers combined in Alaska Native women are now similar to those of United States whites, whereas rates in Alaska Native men are lower than the United States, but only 10% lower. Significant site-specific differences previously reported between Alaska Natives and United States whites persist.
PubMed ID
8877067 View in PubMed
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Alcohol abstainers: a low-risk group for cancer--a cohort study of Norwegian teetotalers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11755
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1993 Mar-Apr;2(2):93-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
K. Kjaerheim
A. Andersen
A. Helseth
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1993 Mar-Apr;2(2):93-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Child
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Temperance
Abstract
Groups with assumed health-protective life-styles have been studied for several decades, in search of causes for cancer. We have analyzed cancer incidence, total mortality, and cause-specific mortality in Norwegian teetotalers to assess the possible health gains from an alcohol-abstaining life-style. A cohort of 5332 members of the International Organization of Good Templars was followed for 10 years from 1980. The cancer incidence and the cause-specific mortality of the cohort has been compared to that of the total Norwegian population. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) for all cancer sites was 74 [95% confidence interval (CI), 64-80] for men and 72 (95% CI, 61-84) for women. For possible alcohol-associated cancers, such as cancer of the oral cavity, pharynx, esophagus, liver, and larynx, the SIR was 43 (95% CI, 17-88) for both sexes combined. For lung cancer the SIR was 57 (95% CI, 37-90) for men and 10 (95% CI, 0-57) for women. When all alcohol- and tobacco-associated cancers were excluded, the SIR for both sexes combined was 79 (95% CI, 69-87). The standardized mortality ratio for total mortality was 81 (95% CI, 65-74). This significant decrease in total mortality was caused by reduced risks for all major causes of death. The study indicates that members of the Norwegian chapter of the International Organization of Good Templars are a low-risk group not only regarding alcohol- and tobacco-associated cancers, but also regarding all other cancers.
PubMed ID
8467252 View in PubMed
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Alcohol, beer and lung cancer--a meaningful relationship?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12807
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1984 Jun;13(2):240-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1984
Author
J D Potter
A J McMichael
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1984 Jun;13(2):240-2
Date
Jun-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism - complications
Beer - adverse effects
Canada
Denmark
Female
Humans
Ireland
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Male
United States
Abstract
The epidemiological evidence relating alcohol consumption and lung cancer is reviewed. Four correlation studies have shown a relationship between alcohol, particularly beer, consumption and lung cancer. Beer consumption was a risk factor in one case-control study. Eight out of ten prospective studies show alcoholics and high alcohol consumers to be at greater risk of lung cancer. Not all of the increased risk in these studies is explainable in terms of confounding by tobacco consumption. There is some animal evidence which supports the effects of alcohol on the likelihood of developing lung cancer.
PubMed ID
6376387 View in PubMed
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Alcohol drinking, social class and cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11116
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1997;(138):251-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
H. Møller
H. Tønnesen
Author Affiliation
Center for Research in Health and Social Statistics, Danish National Research Foundation, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1997;(138):251-63
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Brazil - epidemiology
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Food Habits
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Humans
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
New Zealand - epidemiology
Population
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Class
Abstract
This chapter reviews the data on occurrence of cancers that are potentially caused by alcohol drinking (cancers of the upper gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts, and liver cancer) in relation to social class. In order to assess the role of alcohol drinking in the observed social class gradients of these cancers, we have particularly looked for consistency in the gradients of different alcohol-related cancers, and used lung cancer occurrence to judge the role of tobacco smoking, which is the major other determinant of these diseases. Additional data on levels of alcohol drinking and on the occurrence of other alcohol-related morbidity are brought into the discussion where available. A role of alcohol drinking in the observed negative social class gradients for alcohol-related cancers is very likely in men in France, Italy and New Zealand. Evidence that is less strong, but is suggestive of a role of alcohol drinking, is seen for men in Brazil, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and Denmark. Although a role of alcohol drinking is likely or possible in certain populations, other factors may contribute as well, most notably tobacco smoking and dietary habits. Additional data on the frequency of complications after surgical procedures in alcohol drinkers are reviewed briefly.
PubMed ID
9353668 View in PubMed
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760 records – page 1 of 76.