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180 records – page 1 of 18.

Adult outcomes of childhood bronchiectasis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306824
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2020 12; 79(1):1731059
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-2020
Author
Dawn Sibanda
Rosalyn Singleton
John Clark
Christine Desnoyers
Ellen Hodges
Gretchen Day
Gregory Redding
Author Affiliation
Research Department, Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corporation, Bethel, AK, USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2020 12; 79(1):1731059
Date
12-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska
Alaskan Natives - statistics & numerical data
Bronchiectasis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Lung Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Prevalence
Recurrence
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology
Vital Capacity
Young Adult
Abstract
Recent literature has highlighted the importance of transition from paediatric to adult care for children with chronic conditions. Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis is an important cause of respiratory morbidity in low-income countries and in indigenous children from affluent countries; however, there is little information about adult outcomes of childhood bronchiectasis. We reviewed the clinical course of 31 Alaska Native adults 20-40 years of age from Alaska's Yukon Kuskokwim Delta with childhood bronchiectasis. In patients with chronic suppurative lung disease, a diagnosis of bronchiectasis was made at a median age of 4.5 years by computerised tomography (68%), bronchogram (26%), and radiographs (6%). The patients had a median of 75 lifetime respiratory ambulatory visits and 4.5 hospitalisations. As children, 6 (19%) experienced developmental delay; as adults 9 (29%) experienced mental illness or handicap. Four (13%) patients were deceased, four (13%) had severe pulmonary impairment in adulthood, 17 (54%) had persistent or intermittent respiratory symptoms, and seven (23%) were asymptomatic. In adulthood, only five were seen by adult pulmonologists and most had no documentation of a bronchiectasis diagnosis. Lack of provider continuity, remote location and co-morbidities can contribute to increased adult morbidity. Improving the transition to adult care starting in adolescence and educating adult providers may improve care of adults with childhood bronchiectasis.
PubMed ID
32090714 View in PubMed
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Agricultural medicine: fighting health hazards down on the farm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233602
Source
CMAJ. 1988 Jan 15;138(2):168-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-1988

[Air in mines and health risk (1): A study of the lung cytology of underground workers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68130
Source
Lakartidningen. 1977 Aug 24;74(34):2819-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-24-1977

Air pollution and childhood respiratory health: exposure to sulfate and ozone in 10 Canadian rural communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217580
Source
Environ Res. 1994 Aug;66(2):125-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
B R Stern
M E Raizenne
R T Burnett
L. Jones
J. Kearney
C A Franklin
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Environ Res. 1994 Aug;66(2):125-42
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Lung - physiology
Lung Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Ozone - analysis
Questionnaires
Rural Population
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Sulfates - analysis
Abstract
This study was designed to examine differences in the respiratory health status of preadolescent school children, aged 7-11 years, who resided in 10 rural Canadian communities areas of moderate and low exposure to regional sulfate and ozone pollution. Five of the communities were located in central Saskatchewan, a low-exposure region, and five were located in southwestern Ontario, an area with moderately elevated exposures resulting from long-range atmospheric transport of polluted air masses. In this cross-sectional study, the child's respiratory symptoms and illness history were evaluated using a parent-completed questionnaire, administered in September 1985. Respiratory function was assessed once for each child in the schools between October 1985 and March 1986, by the measurement of pulmonary function for forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1.0), peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), mean forced expiratory flow rate during the middle half of the FVC curve (FEF25-75), and maximal expiratory flow at 50% of the expired vital capacity (V50max). The 1986 annual mean of the 1-hr daily maxima of ozone was higher in Ontario (46.3 ppb) than in Saskatchewan (34.1 ppb), with 90th percentile concentrations of 80 ppb in Ontario and 47 ppb in Saskatchewan. Summertime 1-hr daily maxima means were 69.0 ppb in Ontario and 36.1 ppb in Saskatchewan. Annual mean and 90th percentile concentrations of inhalable sulfates were three times higher in Ontario than in Saskatchewan; there were no significant differences in levels of inhalable particles (PM10) or particulate nitrates. Levels of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) were low in both regions. After controlling for the effects of age, sex, parental smoking, parental education, and gas cooking, no significant regional differences were observed in rates of chronic cough or phlegm, persistent wheeze, current asthma, bronchitis in the past year, or any chest illness that kept the child at home for 3 or more consecutive days during the previous year. Children living in southwestern Ontario had statistically significant (P 0.05).
PubMed ID
8055835 View in PubMed
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Air pollution, hygiene and health of Danish schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41311
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1979 Aug;12(3):251-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1979
Author
B. Holma
G. Kjaer
J. Stokholm
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1979 Aug;12(3):251-86
Date
Aug-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Air Pollution - analysis
Body Height
Child
Chronic Disease
Denmark
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Hygiene
Lung Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Rural Health
Smoking - complications
Urban health
Abstract
A comprehensive investigation forming part of a joint European study under the auspices of "WHO Long-Term Air Pollution Programme" uses 7-13 year old schoolchildren as the target group. The study has included social, housing, hygienic and epidemic factors as well as family smoking habits. The results indicate that, at exposure to low levels of air pollution, these factors dominate as causes for the impairment of health especially that of respiratory health.
PubMed ID
493955 View in PubMed
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Anaesthetic practice and postoperative pulmonary complications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222795
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 1992 Nov;36(8):812-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1992
Author
T. Pedersen
J. Viby-Mogensen
C. Ringsted
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 1992 Nov;36(8):812-8
Date
Nov-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Anesthesia Recovery Period
Anesthesia, Conduction - methods
Anesthesia, General - methods
Atracurium - administration & dosage
Bupivacaine - administration & dosage
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Lung Diseases - epidemiology
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Pancuronium - administration & dosage
Pneumonia - epidemiology
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Atelectasis - epidemiology
Respiratory Insufficiency - epidemiology
Risk factors
Surgical Procedures, Operative
Time Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to identify risk factors associated with postoperative pulmonary complications. The influence of the anaesthetic technique was evaluated (i.e. general contra regional anaesthesia and long contra intermediately acting muscle relaxants (pancuronium and atracurium)) taking into account the patient's age, the presence or absence of chronic obstructive lung disease (preoperative risk factors), the type of surgery and the duration of anaesthesia (perioperative risk factors). Seven thousand and twenty-nine patients undergoing abdominal, urological, gynaecological or orthopaedic surgery were included in the study. A total of 290 patients (4.1%) suffered from one or more postoperative pulmonary complications. Six thousand and sixty-two patients received general anaesthesia and 4.5% of these had postoperative pulmonary complications. Of the patients admitted to major surgery receiving pancuronium, 12.7% (135/1062) developed postoperative pulmonary complications, compared to only 5.1% (23/449) receiving atracurium (P
PubMed ID
1466220 View in PubMed
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Antioxidants, infections and environmental factors in health and disease in northern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3181
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998 Jul;57(2-3):109-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998
Author
P. Luoma
Author Affiliation
Regional Institute of Occupational Health, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998 Jul;57(2-3):109-13
Date
Jul-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antioxidants - metabolism - pharmacology
Arctic Regions
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Free Radicals - adverse effects
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Life expectancy
Lung Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Abstract
Recent studies have identified several factors which may affect human health and life expectancy in northern Finland. They have shown that antioxidants, infections, genetic or environmental factors may affect the development of and morbidity/mortality from cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes mellitus and other diseases in the northern provinces of this country. Both the occurrence and mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD) is low in the northernmost part of the country, i.e. Mountain Lapland or the Saami area, compared with that in whole country or a neighbouring region to the south in central Lapland. The mortality from all diseases is also low in communities in Mountain Lapland, and high in central Lapland in communities such as Kittilä and Kolari. High scrum antioxidants, alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E), albumin and selenium levels have been measured in men living in the northernmost part of the country, where the death rate from CHD is low. Low serum alpha-tocopherol and albumin levels were typical of men living in rural communities with high CHD mortality, e.g. Kittilä community. Serum antioxidant levels were related to the diet; alpha-tocopherol increased with the consumption of reindeer meat and selenium with fish consumption. Our earlier studies have also identified a low Chlamydia pneumoniae IgA antibody titer in men living in Mountain Lapland compared with men in the neighboring region to the south in central Lapland with high CHD mortality. An elevated Chlamydia pneumoniae IgA antibody titer was associated with low serum alpha-tocopherol level. The people of Saami origin, an ethnic minority living in northernmost Finland, have a high apolipoprotein (apo) E e4 allele frequency and high serum cholesterol. They also have more apo A-IV-2 allele than most of the studied populations, and their HDL cholesterol levels are higher in apo A-IV-2/1 than in apo A-IV-1/1 phenotypes. Our earlier studies indicate that people living in northeastern Finland, west of smelters in Kola Peninsula may be exposed to heavy metals such as cadmium and mercury. Blood cadmium was related to blood pressure and high in men with arterial hypertensive disease. The investigations presented in this article form a good basis for further studies that clarify underlying reasons the health problems in the north.
PubMed ID
9753878 View in PubMed
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Asbestos-related disease among sheet-metal workers. Preliminary results of the National Sheet Metal Worker Asbestos Disease Screening Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225186
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1991 Dec 31;643:287-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-31-1991
Author
L S Welch
D. Michaels
S. Zoloth
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, George Washington University, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, D.C. 20037.
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1991 Dec 31;643:287-95
Date
Dec-31-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asbestos - adverse effects
Canada
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Lung Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Questionnaires
Respiratory Function Tests
Smoking - adverse effects
United States
PubMed ID
1809142 View in PubMed
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Assessing the health impacts of air pollution: a re-analysis of the Hamilton children's cohort data using a spatial analytic approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159088
Source
Int J Environ Health Res. 2008 Feb;18(1):17-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Theodora Pouliou
Pavlos S Kanaroglou
Susan J Elliott
L David Pengelly
Author Affiliation
School of Geography and Earth Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. pouliot@mcmaster.ca
Source
Int J Environ Health Res. 2008 Feb;18(1):17-35
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - toxicity
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Child
Cohort Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Lung - physiopathology
Lung Diseases - epidemiology
Multivariate Analysis
Ontario - epidemiology
Respiratory Function Tests
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
The objective of this paper was to reassess children's exposure to air pollution as well as investigate the importance of other covariates of respiratory health. We re-examined the Hamilton Children's Cohort (HCC) dataset with enhanced spatial analysis methods, refined in the approximately two decades since the original study was undertaken. Children's exposure to air pollution was first re-estimated using kriging and land-use regression. The land-use regression model performed better, compared to kriging, in capturing local variation of air pollution. Multivariate linear and logistic regression analysis was then applied for the study of potential risk factors for respiratory health. Findings agree with the HCC study-results, confirming that children's respiratory health was associated with maternal smoking, hospitalization in infancy and air pollution. However, results from this study reveal a stronger association between children's respiratory health and air pollution. Additionally, this study demonstrated associations with low-income, household crowding and chest illness in siblings.
PubMed ID
18231944 View in PubMed
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[Assessing the relationship between the air pollution and incidence of respiratory diseases in the Primor'e territory].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190957
Source
Gig Sanit. 2002 Jan-Feb;(1):19-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
P F Kiku
L V Veremchuk
L A Belik
Source
Gig Sanit. 2002 Jan-Feb;(1):19-22
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Catchment Area (Health)
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lung Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Prevalence
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The prevalence of respiratory diseases in the Primorye territory is discussed. Ecological risk of air pollution effects on respiratory morbidity is estimated. High ecological risk of respiratory diseases in the cities of the region is determined by car transport waste discharge. Children and adolescents are more sensitive to air pollution and more often suffer from respiratory diseases.
PubMed ID
11899861 View in PubMed
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180 records – page 1 of 18.