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9 records – page 1 of 1.

Asbestos-induced lung injury among Danish jewelry workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216776
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1994 Dec;26(6):755-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
M. Døssing
S W Langer
Author Affiliation
Medical Department P, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1994 Dec;26(6):755-8
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asbestos - adverse effects
Asbestosis - diagnosis
Denmark
Female
Humans
Industry
Lung Diseases - diagnosis - etiology
Male
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Respiratory Function Tests
Abstract
Asbestos has been used extensively in a variety of occupations. In the jewelry industry, inadequate hygiene practices may often go unrecognized with resultant exposure to hazardous amounts of asbestos. We report on four retired jewelers. Two of these had both pleural and parenchymal changes. One had isolated pleural plaques and the final patient showed only parenchymal infiltrates. Their work involved hand cutting asbestos plates used for protection during soldering. In the soldering process asbestos fibers were then blown into the workroom air as the plates broke down. In addition, at the end of each work day the workroom floor was swept, with subsequent airborne asbestos dust distribution. Any patient with pleural plaques or interstitial lung disease should be questioned about potential sources of asbestos exposure in the past, regardless of present employment status.
PubMed ID
7892826 View in PubMed
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[Decentralized special training in pulmonary medicine. A project using telemedicine]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6412
Source
Nord Med. 1998 Sep;113(7):237-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
U. Aasebø
R. Opdahl
H H Strøm
E. Arild
B. Bach
Author Affiliation
Lungeseksjonen, Medisinsk avdeling, Regionsykehuset i Tromsø.
Source
Nord Med. 1998 Sep;113(7):237-9
Date
Sep-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Education, Medical, Continuing
English Abstract
Hospitals, Special
Humans
Lung Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Norway
Specialties, Medical
Telemedicine
Abstract
In arctic Norway, where there is a lack of specialists in pulmonary medicine two postgraduate students, already qualified as specialists in internal medicine at Tromsø Regional Hospital, applied to continue their training at their respective local hospitals. The regional hospital in Tromsø has a long tradition of telemedicine, with network links to local hospitals in the region, and is equipped for interactive consultation and the bilateral transmission of x-rays and video recordings, and digital transmission of x-rays. Accordingly, supported by their supervisor, the two postgraduate students applied to the committee for postgraduate education in pulmonary medicine to have a year's work at their respective local hospitals, supervised via the telemedicine facilities, accepted as equivalent to a six-month module of the normal syllabus. The project was approved and executed as planned. The registrars, who were responsible for pulmonary service at their local hospitals, served four days a month at the regional hospital, and their supervisor visited the local hospitals one day each month. All internal education at the regional hospital was made available by means of a weekly interactive televised link-up, x-rays being displayed on screen as transmitted digitally; bronchoscopies were shown by video, and ad hoc tutorials arranged as needed. Evaluated by the national committee, the project was found satisfactory, and the registrars were duly qualified.
PubMed ID
9755622 View in PubMed
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[Enterogenic cyst in the mediastinal and retroperitoneal space with penetration into the lungs in a newborn baby]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21249
Source
Klin Khir. 1998;(6):48-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998

[Occupational lung pathology in gas cutters].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103668
Source
Ter Arkh. 1990;62(10):46-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
M L Khaimovich
L F Budanova
V N Boitsov
E Iu Ornitsan
Source
Ter Arkh. 1990;62(10):46-9
Date
1990
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aerosols
Bronchitis - diagnosis - etiology
Chronic Disease
Engineering
Humans
Lung Diseases - diagnosis - etiology
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - etiology
Pneumoconiosis - diagnosis - etiology
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - diagnosis - etiology
Russia
Ships
Steel
Abstract
The authors provide the results of clinical, x-ray, functional and specific allergological examinations made in 396 cutters. Characterize the main forms of occupational respiratory pathology--pneumoconiosis and chronic bronchitis. Haptene metals (chromium, nickel, manganese) contained by the industrial aerosol were established to produce a sensitizing action on the body. The data obtained may be of importance for the diagnosis and prevention of occupational diseases in cutters, expert medical evaluation of the working capacity and follow-up of the patients.
PubMed ID
2150723 View in PubMed
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[Principles for assessment and diagnosis of work-related pulmonary and pleural diseases]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22752
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Feb 28;116(6):739-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-1996
Author
T B Aasen
J. Kongerud
K I Myhre
O A Hauge
H. Kjuus
E. Melbostad
Author Affiliation
Yrkesmedisinsk avdeling, Haukeland Sykehus, Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Feb 28;116(6):739-41
Date
Feb-28-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disability Evaluation
English Abstract
Humans
Insurance Claim Review
Lung Diseases - diagnosis - etiology
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - diagnosis - etiology
Lung Neoplasms - diagnosis - etiology
Norway
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - etiology
Pleural Diseases - diagnosis - etiology
Pleural Neoplasms - diagnosis - etiology
Abstract
Proposals for diagnostic methods and clinical evaluation of occupational lung and pleural diseases have been worked out by a Working Group appointed by the Norwegian Thoracic Society and the Norwegian Society of Occupational Medicine. The management of this group of diseases demands both an evaluation of occupational exposure and a specific pulmonary diagnosis. Recommendations were made especially for obstructive, interstitial, and malignant diseases.
PubMed ID
8644077 View in PubMed
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Proceedings of a consensus conference: towards an understanding of TRALI.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175254
Source
Transfus Med Rev. 2005 Jan;19(1):2-31
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Mindy Goldman
Kathryn E Webert
Donald M Arnold
John Freedman
Judith Hannon
Morris A Blajchman
Author Affiliation
Canadian Blood Services, Medical, Scientific and Research Affairs, Ottawa, Ontario K1G 4J5, Canada. mindy.goldman@bloodservices.ca
Source
Transfus Med Rev. 2005 Jan;19(1):2-31
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Blood Transfusion - adverse effects
Canada
Consensus
Female
Humans
Lung Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Risk factors
Syndrome
Time Factors
Transplantation, Homologous
United States
Abstract
Transfusion-related acute lung injury is a relatively uncommon transfusion-associated adverse effect occurring during or soon after an allogeneic blood transfusion. Transfusion-related acute lung injury is a complex syndrome that has many manifestations and has only recently been identified to be an important cause of transfusion-associated morbidity and mortality. But despite its increasing recognition, much about the pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention is poorly understood and often controversial. The purpose of this consensus conference was to bring together international experts in an effort to try to standardize a case definition, which could be used to enhance future understanding of transfusion-related acute lung injury including its epidemiology, pathogenesis, management, prevention, and research. These proceedings are being provided with a view to making available to the transfusion medicine community the considerable amount of important information presented at this consensus conference by the invited international panel of experts.
PubMed ID
15830325 View in PubMed
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Recommendations for reducing the effect of grain dust on the lungs. Canadian Thoracic Society Standards Committee.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210571
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Nov 15;155(10):1399-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1996
Author
M. Becklake
I. Broder
M. Chan-Yeung
J A Dosman
P. Ernst
F A Herbert
S M Kennedy
P W Warren
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McGill University, Montreal, Que.
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Nov 15;155(10):1399-403
Date
Nov-15-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis - standards
Canada
Cereals - adverse effects - chemistry
Dust - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - standards
Humans
Lung Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Respiratory Function Tests
Risk factors
Abstract
To assess the appropriateness of the current Canadian standards for exposure to grain dust in the workplace.
The current permissible exposure limit of 10 mg of total grain dust per cubic metre of air (expressed as mg/m3) as an 8-hour time-weighted average exposure, or a lower permissible exposure limit.
Acute symptoms of grain-dust exposure, such as cough, phlegm production, wheezing and dyspnea, similar chronic symptoms, and spirometric deficits revealing obstructive or restrictive disease.
Articles published from 1924 to December 1993 were identified from Index Medicus and the bibliographies of pertinent articles. Subsequent articles published from 1994 (when the recommendations were approved by the Canadian Thoracic Society Standards Committee) to June 1996 were retrieved through a search of MEDLINE, and modification of the recommendations was not found to be necessary. Studies of interest were those that linked measurements of total grain dust levels to the development of acute and chronic respiratory symptoms and changes in lung function in exposed workers. Papers on the effects of grain dust on workers in feed mills were not included because other nutrients such as animal products may have been added to the grain. Unpublished reports (e.g., to Labour Canada) were included as sources of information.
A high value was placed on minimizing the biological harm that grain dust has on the lungs of grain workers.
A permissible exposure limit of 5 mg/m3 would control the short-term effects of exposure to grain dust on workers. Evidence is insufficient to determine what level is needed to prevent long-term effects. The economic implications of implementing a lower permissible exposure limit have not been evaluated.
The current Canadian standards for grain-dust exposure should be reviewed by Labour Canada and the grain industry. A permissible exposure level of 5 mg/m3 is recommended to control short-term effects. Further measurements that link the levels of exposure to respiratory health effects in workers across Canada should be collected to establish an exposure-response relation and possible regional differences in the effects of grain dust.
There has been no external review of these recommendations. However, the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists has recommended an 8-hour average exposure limit of 4 mg/m3 for wheat, oats and barley.
Notes
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PubMed ID
8943927 View in PubMed
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[Use of occupational anamnesis at a lung department].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232294
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1988 Oct 30;108(30):2729-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1988

9 records – page 1 of 1.