Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

[A 49 year old male with a giant pulmonary bulla--a case report and review of the literature]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91438
Source
Laeknabladid. 2008 Oct;94(10):673-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Asgeirsson Hilmar
Lúdvíksdóttir Dóra
Kjartansson Olafur
Gudbjartsson Tómas
Author Affiliation
Landspítala, Hringbraut, Reykjavik.
Source
Laeknabladid. 2008 Oct;94(10):673-7
Date
Oct-2008
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blister - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Humans
Lung - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Lung Diseases - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Lung Volume Measurements
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonectomy
Radiography, Thoracic
Spirometry
Thoracotomy
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
A 49 year old previously healthy smoker was diagnosed with a giant bulla in his right lung, following a history of dry cough, repeated upper airway infections and increasing dyspnea for several years. Computed tomography (CT) confirmed the presence of a giant bulla in the right inferior lobe and several smaller bullae in the right superior lobe. The giant bulla was 17 cm in diameter, occupying more than half of the right hemithorax. On spirometry a moderate restrictive and a mild obstructive pattern was observed. Lung volume was measured with two different techniques, nitrogen washout and plethysmography, with volume of the bullae estimated at 2.9 L, similar to the 3.2 L determined by CT. The patient underwent thoracotomy, where the giant bulla together with the inferior lobe were removed with lobectomy and the small bullae in the superior lobe with wedge resection. Five months postoperatively the patient is in good health and is back at work. Postoperatively significant improvements in spirometry values and lung volume measurements have been documented. This case demonstrates that giant bullae can be successfully managed with surgical resection and their size can be determined by different techniques, including lung volume measurements and chest CT.
PubMed ID
18974430 View in PubMed
Less detail

Transplantation of initially rejected donor lungs after ex vivo lung perfusion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120509
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2012 Nov;144(5):1222-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Andreas Wallinder
Sven-Erik Ricksten
Christoffer Hansson
Gerdt C Riise
Martin Silverborn
Hans Liden
Michael Olausson
Göran Dellgren
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2012 Nov;144(5):1222-8
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Airway Extubation
Donor Selection
Hematocrit
Hemodynamics
Humans
Length of Stay
Lung - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Lung Transplantation - adverse effects - methods
Middle Aged
Perfusion - adverse effects - methods
Primary Graft Dysfunction - etiology
Pulmonary Gas Exchange
Respiratory Function Tests
Sweden
Time Factors
Tissue Donors - supply & distribution
Treatment Outcome
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Ex vivo lung perfusion has the potential to increase the number of patients treated with lung transplantation. Our initial clinical experience with ex vivo lung perfusion is reviewed as well as early clinical outcome in patients transplanted with reconditioned lungs.
Six pairs of donor lungs deemed unsuitable for transplantation underwent ex vivo lung perfusion with Steen solution mixed with red blood cells to a hematocrit of 10% to 15%. After reconditioning, lung function was evaluated and acceptable lungs were transplanted. Technical experience with ex vivo lung perfusion as well as clinical outcome for patients transplanted with ex vivo lung perfusion-treated lungs were evaluated.
Donor lungs initially rejected either as a result of an inferior partial pressure of arterial oxygen/ fraction of inspired oxygen (n = 5; mean, 20.5 kPa; range, 9.1-29.9 kPa) or infiltrate on chest radiograph (n = 1) improved their oxygenation capacity to a mean partial pressure of arterial oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen of 57 ± 10 kPa during the ex vivo lung perfusion (mean improvement, 33.6 kPa; range, 21-51 kPa; P
PubMed ID
22995721 View in PubMed
Less detail