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Accelerated lung function decline in swine confinement workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208355
Source
Chest. 1997 Jun;111(6):1733-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
A. Senthilselvan
J A Dosman
S P Kirychuk
E M Barber
C S Rhodes
Y. Zhang
T S Hurst
Author Affiliation
Centre for Agricultural Medicine, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Chest. 1997 Jun;111(6):1733-41
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - physiology
Agriculture
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Cereals
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Lung - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Respiratory Function Tests - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population
Saskatchewan
Smoking - physiopathology
Swine
Abstract
We conducted a longitudinal study to determine the annual rate decline in pulmonary function measurements in male swine confinement workers. For comparison, a grain farming group and a nonfarming rural-dwelling control group were also chosen for the longitudinal study. Two hundred seventeen swine confinement workers, 218 grain farmers, and 179 nonfarming control subjects had valid pulmonary function measurements at the baseline observation conducted in 1990 to 1991 and at the second observation conducted in 1994 to 1995. The swine confinement workers were younger (mean age=38.3+/-11.7 [SD] years) than the nonfarming control subjects (42.6+/-10.4 years) and the grain farmers (44.5+/-11.9 years). When stratified by age, nonfarming control subjects had the lowest mean annual rate decline in FEV1 and FVC in all age categories. The swine confinement workers had the largest annual rate decline in FEV1 and FVC, and this was most obvious in the middle age categories. After controlling for age, height, smoking, and baseline pulmonary function, swine confinement workers had excess annual decline of 26.1 mL in FEV1 (p=0.0005), 33.5 mL in FVC (p=0.0002), and 42.0 mL/s in forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of FVC (FEF[25-75%]) (p=0.02) over nonfarming control subjects. Grain farmers had excess annual decline of 16.4 mL in FEV1 (p=0.03), 26.7 mL in FVC (p=0.002), and 11.2 mL/s in FEF(25-75%) (p=0.38) over control subjects. These findings suggest that workers engaged in the swine industry and grain farmers appear prone to accelerated yearly losses in lung function and may therefore be at risk for the future development of chronic airflow limitation.
PubMed ID
9187201 View in PubMed
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The ageing of lung function: cross-sectional and longitudinal studies of an Inuit community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3559
Source
Eur Respir J. 1994 Sep;7(9):1653-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
A. Rode
R J Shephard
Author Affiliation
School of Physical & Health Education, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1994 Sep;7(9):1653-9
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Aging - physiology
Arctic Regions
Canada
Cold Climate
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Inuits
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Lung - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Function Tests
Respiratory Tract Diseases - ethnology
Smoking - physiopathology
Abstract
Three surveys (1969/1970, 1979/1980 and 1989/1990) have examined the impact of acculturation to a sedentary lifestyle on the pulmonary function of a circumpolar native Inuit community. The sample comprised more than 50% of those aged 20-60 yrs, most recently 119 males and 92 females. Forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and maximal mid-expiratory flow (MMEF) were measured by standard spirometric techniques, and information was obtained on smoking habits and health. Multiple regression equations showed that lung function was affected by height and age, but usually not by age squared. Cross-sectional age coefficients for FVC and FEV1 increased over the period 1969/1970 to 1989/1990. Parallel longitudinal trends were seen in FEV1 (males only). Multiple analysis of variance (MANOVA) showed age-decade*cohort effects for FVC and FEV1 (males but not females). Almost all of the population now smoke (mean +/- SD males 13 +/- 8 cigarettes.day-1; females 11 +/- 7 cigarettes.day-1). However, smoking bears little relationship to lung function perhaps due to limited variance in consumption. About a third of the community have physician-diagnosed and/or radiographically visible chest disease, but with little effect upon pulmonary function. We conclude that an apparent secular trend to a faster ageing of lung function in men is not explained by disease or domestic air pollution. Possible factors include increased lung volumes in young adults, greater pack-years of cigarette exposure, nonspecific respiratory disease, increased inspiration of cold air or altered chest mechanics due to operation of high-speed snowmobiles, and loss of physical fitness.
PubMed ID
7995396 View in PubMed
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[Age-related changes in lungs' vital capacity in Ryazan schoolchildren].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168927
Source
Gig Sanit. 2006 Mar-Apr;(2):61-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
M F Sautkin
G I Stuneeva
V A Kiriushin
Source
Gig Sanit. 2006 Mar-Apr;(2):61-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Aging - physiology
Catchment Area (Health)
Child
Female
Humans
Lung - physiology
Male
Russia
Students
Vital Capacity - physiology
Abstract
The vital capacity in the 11- and 14-year old boys and 11- and 13-year old girls examined in 1996 to 1999 significantly reduced as compared in the children of the same age. The significant increase in the vital capacity in 15-16-old girls examined in 1996-1999 is due to that in their height, as compared with these indices in those examined in 1976 (by 4.64 and 4.87, respectively).
PubMed ID
16758825 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and childhood respiratory health: exposure to sulfate and ozone in 10 Canadian rural communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217580
Source
Environ Res. 1994 Aug;66(2):125-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
B R Stern
M E Raizenne
R T Burnett
L. Jones
J. Kearney
C A Franklin
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Environ Res. 1994 Aug;66(2):125-42
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Lung - physiology
Lung Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Ozone - analysis
Questionnaires
Rural Population
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Sulfates - analysis
Abstract
This study was designed to examine differences in the respiratory health status of preadolescent school children, aged 7-11 years, who resided in 10 rural Canadian communities areas of moderate and low exposure to regional sulfate and ozone pollution. Five of the communities were located in central Saskatchewan, a low-exposure region, and five were located in southwestern Ontario, an area with moderately elevated exposures resulting from long-range atmospheric transport of polluted air masses. In this cross-sectional study, the child's respiratory symptoms and illness history were evaluated using a parent-completed questionnaire, administered in September 1985. Respiratory function was assessed once for each child in the schools between October 1985 and March 1986, by the measurement of pulmonary function for forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1.0), peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), mean forced expiratory flow rate during the middle half of the FVC curve (FEF25-75), and maximal expiratory flow at 50% of the expired vital capacity (V50max). The 1986 annual mean of the 1-hr daily maxima of ozone was higher in Ontario (46.3 ppb) than in Saskatchewan (34.1 ppb), with 90th percentile concentrations of 80 ppb in Ontario and 47 ppb in Saskatchewan. Summertime 1-hr daily maxima means were 69.0 ppb in Ontario and 36.1 ppb in Saskatchewan. Annual mean and 90th percentile concentrations of inhalable sulfates were three times higher in Ontario than in Saskatchewan; there were no significant differences in levels of inhalable particles (PM10) or particulate nitrates. Levels of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) were low in both regions. After controlling for the effects of age, sex, parental smoking, parental education, and gas cooking, no significant regional differences were observed in rates of chronic cough or phlegm, persistent wheeze, current asthma, bronchitis in the past year, or any chest illness that kept the child at home for 3 or more consecutive days during the previous year. Children living in southwestern Ontario had statistically significant (P 0.05).
PubMed ID
8055835 View in PubMed
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Alpha1-antitrypsin phenotypes and lung function in a moderately polluted northern Ontario community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248762
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1978 Mar 18;118(6):669-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-18-1978
Author
D N Ostrow
J. Manfreda
T. Dorman
R M Cherniack
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1978 Mar 18;118(6):669-72
Date
Mar-18-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollution
Female
Humans
Lung - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Phenotype
Respiratory Function Tests
Smoking
alpha 1-Antitrypsin - genetics
Abstract
To determine whether persons with intermediate value alpha1-antitrypsin phenotypes living in a polluted environment manifest significant abnormalities in lung function, a study was undertaken of an age-, sex- and smoking-stratified sample of 391 persons from the town of Fort Frances, Ont., which has elevated values of total dustfall, suspended particulates and hydrogen sulfide. Indices of pulmonary function were derived from the maximum expiratory flow and the single breath expiratory flow and the single breath expiratory nitrogen washout curves. The percentage frequency of the M, MS and MZ pheontypes was 91.7, 7.3 and 0.8, respectively. There was no significant difference between the M and MS groups as indicated by the nitrogen washout curve and maximum expiratory flow curve. There was no significant difference between the three MZ subjects and the M group. In both M and MS groups smokers displayed evidence of airflow obstruction when compared with nonsmokers. It would appear that, when compared with M subjects, persons with the MS phenotype living in a moderately polluted area show no changes in indicators of pulmonary function, including tests of early airway disease, that cannot be attributed to their smoking habit.
Notes
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1974 Dec;110(6):708-154547935
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Cites: N Engl J Med. 1975 Feb 6;292(6):278-811078596
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Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1973 May;107(5):744-524695626
PubMed ID
306869 View in PubMed
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Anticipating maximal or submaximal exercise: no differences in cardiopulmonary responses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142270
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2010 Sep;30(5):333-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Ida Kjelkenes
Einar Thorsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2010 Sep;30(5):333-7
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anticipation, Psychological
Exercise - psychology
Exercise Test
Female
Heart - physiology
Heart rate
Humans
Linear Models
Lung - physiology
Male
Norway
Oxygen consumption
Pulmonary Ventilation
Tidal Volume
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Anticipation before the start of exercise may influence the cardiopulmonary responses during exercise. If anticipation influences the responses differently with maximal and submaximal exercises, normative values for submaximal responses will not be comparable unless exercise has been continued to the same end point.
Twelve healthy subjects (five men) aged 18-27 years had a maximal exercise test and a submaximal exercise test on a cycle ergometer on different days and in random order. They were not aware of the specific purpose of the study and were informed 15 min before the tests whether it should be maximal or submaximal. Workload increased with 15 W min(-1) until exhaustion or to 80% of predicted maximal heart rate (HR). HR, oxygen uptake (VO(2)), carbon dioxide production (VCO(2)), minute ventilation (V(E)) and tidal volume (V(T)) were averaged over 20 s intervals. Linear regression of the HR-VO(2) relationship and quadratic regression of the V(T)-V(E) relationship were performed for each individual, and the regression coefficients for maximal and submaximal tests were compared.
The regression models described the V(T)-V(E) responses with a R(2) > 0.85 in 23 of 24 tests, and the HR-VO(2) responses with a R(2) > 0.90 in all tests. The regression coefficients of the relationships were not significantly different with maximal and submaximal exercises.
Anticipation appears not to influence the responses to progressive maximal and submaximal exercise tests with the same rate of increase in load. Normative values at submaximal exercise levels are not influenced by the targeted end point of exercise.
PubMed ID
20618359 View in PubMed
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The association between dynamic lung volume and peak oxygen uptake in a healthy general population: the HUNT study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299714
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2019 Jan 06; 19(1):2
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-06-2019
Author
Øystein Rasch-Halvorsen
Erlend Hassel
Arnulf Langhammer
Ben M Brumpton
Sigurd Steinshamn
Author Affiliation
K.G. Jebsen Center for Exercise in Medicine, Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. oystein.rasch-halvorsen@ntnu.no.
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2019 Jan 06; 19(1):2
Date
Jan-06-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Exercise Test
Female
Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology
Healthy Volunteers
Humans
Linear Models
Lung - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Sex Factors
Spirometry
Young Adult
Abstract
Although dynamic lung volume is not considered a limiting factor of peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) in healthy subjects, an association between forced expiratory lung volume in one second (FEV1) and VO2peak has been reported in a healthy population aged 69 - 77?years. We hypothesized that a corresponding association could be found in a healthy general population including young and middle-aged subjects.
In a population-based study in Norway, we investigated the association between FEV1 above the lower limit of normal (LLN) and VO2peak using linear regression and assessed the ventilatory reserve (VR) in healthy subjects aged 20 - 79?years (n?=?741).
On average, one standard deviation (SD) increase in FEV1 was associated with 1.2?ml/kg/min (95% CI 0.7 - 1.6) higher VO2peak. The association did not differ statistically by sex (p-value for interaction?=?0.16) and was similar (0.9?ml/kg/min, 95% CI 0.2 - 1.5) in a sensitivity analysis including only never-smokers (n?=?376). In subjects below and above 45?years of age, corresponding estimates were 1.2?ml/kg/min (95% CI 0.5 - 1.8) and 1.2?ml/kg/min (95% CI 0.5 - 1.9), respectively. Preserved VR (= 20%) was observed in 66.6% of men and 86.4% of women.
Normal dynamic lung volume, defined as FEV1 above LLN, was positively associated with VO2peak in both men and women, in never-smokers and in subjects below and above 45?years of age. The majority of subjects had preserved VR, and the results suggest that FEV1 within normal limits may influence VO2peak in healthy subjects even when no ventilatory limitation to exercise is evident.
PubMed ID
30612551 View in PubMed
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Association between level of physical activity and lung function among Norwegian men and women: the HUNT study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79414
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2006 Dec;10(12):1399-405
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Nystad W.
Samuelsen S O
Nafstad P.
Langhammer A.
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Nydalen, N-0403 Oslo, Norway. wenche.nystad@fhi.no
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2006 Dec;10(12):1399-405
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Exercise - physiology
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Lung - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Questionnaires
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To estimate the association between level of physical activity in 1984-1986 and 1995-1997 and lung function in 1995-1997 among Norwegian men and women aged 28-80 years. DESIGN: In 1984-1986 and 1995-1997, all residents of Nord-Trøndelag County, Norway, aged > or =20 years were invited to participate in the Nord-Trøndelag Health Studies. These analyses included a sample that took part in both studies and underwent spirometry (n = 8047). We used linear regression models adjusting for potential confounders stratified by sex and age groups (28-49 years, 50-69 years and > or =70 years) to estimate the association between forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and physical activity. RESULTS: Men and women who were physically active in 1985 and 1995 had the highest lung function in both sexes and in all age groups. The reduction in FEV1 ranged from 20 ml to 170 ml, similar to 1-7% of predicted values dependent on physical activity level. Lung function was also associated with body mass index (BMI), height, smoking and subjective health. CONCLUSIONS: The findings show that a high level of physical activity corresponds to about 3-5 years of normal decline in FEV1 (30 ml/year), and may therefore overcome the disadvantages of a decline in FEV1 from increasing age.
PubMed ID
17167959 View in PubMed
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Association between pulmonary function and peak oxygen uptake in elderly: the Generation 100 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274398
Source
Respir Res. 2015;16:156
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Erlend Hassel
Dorthe Stensvold
Thomas Halvorsen
Ulrik Wisløff
Arnulf Langhammer
Sigurd Steinshamn
Source
Respir Res. 2015;16:156
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - physiology
Exercise Test
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Linear Models
Lung - physiology
Male
Norway
Oxygen consumption
Predictive value of tests
Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity
Sex Factors
Spirometry
Abstract
Although reduced function of the respiratory system limits peak oxygen uptake in diseases affecting the lungs or airways, the healthy respiratory system is thought to have a spare capacity for oxygen transport and uptake, and is not considered a limiting factor for peak oxygen uptake in healthy people. However, lung function declines with age and could theoretically limit peak oxygen uptake in elderly. We examined the association between peak oxygen uptake and lung function indices in an elderly population with the hypothesis that lung function indices would be associated with VO2peak up to a threshold value situated above the lower limits of normal lung function for our population.
Spirometry, gas diffusion tests and incremental work tests were performed in 1443 subjects (714 women) aged 69-77 years. Association between lung function indices and peak oxygen uptake was studied with hockey-stick regression.
Forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) had a positive association with peak oxygen uptake up to, but not above, a threshold value of 2.86 l for men, and 2.13 l for women (lower limit of normal 2.73 and 1.77 l respectively). A corresponding threshold was found for diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) for men at 9.18 mmol/min/kPa (lower limit of normal 6.84 mmol/min/kPa). DLCO for women and DLCO divided by alveolar volume (DLCO/VA) for both sexes had a significant linear relationship to VO2peak (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
26715058 View in PubMed
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96 records – page 1 of 10.