Skip header and navigation

Refine By

64 records – page 1 of 7.

238Pu: accumulation, tissue distribution, and excretion in Mayak workers after exposure to plutonium aerosols.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126152
Source
Health Phys. 2012 Mar;102(3):243-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Klara G Suslova
Alexandra B Sokolova
Viktor V Khokhryakov
Scott C Miller
Author Affiliation
Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorskoe Shosse 19, Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk Region, Russia. suslova@subi.su
Source
Health Phys. 2012 Mar;102(3):243-50
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerosols
Bone and Bones - metabolism - radiation effects
Health Physics
Humans
Liver - metabolism - radiation effects
Lung - metabolism - radiation effects
Occupational Exposure
Plutonium - administration & dosage - pharmacokinetics - toxicity - urine
Russia
Solubility
Tissue Distribution
Abstract
The alpha spectrometry measurements of specific activity of 238Pu and 239Pu in urine from bioassay examinations of 1,013 workers employed at the radiochemical and plutonium production facilities of the Mayak Production Association and in autopsy specimens of lung, liver, and skeleton from 85 former nuclear workers who died between 1974-2009, are summarized.The accumulation fraction of 238Pu in the body and excreta has not changed with time in workers involved in production of weapons-grade plutonium production (e.g., the plutonium production facility and the former radiochemical facility). The accumulation fraction of 238Pu in individuals exposed to plutonium isotopes at the newer Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant ranged from 0.13% up to 27.5% based on the autopsy data. No statistically significant differences between 238Pu and 239Pu in distribution by the main organs of plutonium deposition were found in the Mayak workers. Based on the bioassay data,the fraction of 238Pu activity in urine is on average 38-69% of the total activity of 238Pu and 239Pu, which correlates with the isotopic composition in workplace air sampled at the Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant. In view of the higher specific activity of 238Pu, the contribution of 238Pu to the total internal dose, particularly in the skeleton and liver, might be expected to continue to increase, and continued surveillance is recommended.
PubMed ID
22420016 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accelerated apoptosis and low bcl-2 expression associated with neuroendocrine differentiation predict shortened survival in operated large cell carcinoma of the lung.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20816
Source
Pathol Oncol Res. 1999;5(3):179-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
A K Eerola
H. Ruokolainen
Y. Soini
H. Raunio
P. Pääkkö
Author Affiliation
University of Oulu, Department of Pathology Kajaanintie 52 D, Oulu, FIN-90401, Finland.
Source
Pathol Oncol Res. 1999;5(3):179-86
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Apoptosis
Blotting, Western
Carcinoma, Neuroendocrine - metabolism - mortality - pathology - surgery
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung - metabolism - mortality - pathology - surgery
Cell Differentiation
Cyclin D1 - metabolism
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Lung Neoplasms - metabolism - mortality - pathology - surgery
Male
Membrane Proteins - metabolism
Middle Aged
Necrosis
Neoplasm Proteins - metabolism
Prognosis
Proto-Oncogene Proteins - metabolism
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 - metabolism
Survival Rate
bcl-2 Homologous Antagonist-Killer Protein
bcl-2-Associated X Protein
Abstract
In order to test the hypothesis that increased apoptotic activity is connected with neuroendocrine differentiation and low differentiation degree in large cell carcinoma (LCLC) and is regulated by bcl-2 family proteins, we analysed the extent of apoptosis and tumor necrosis and their relation to the expression of bcl-2, bax, bak and mcl-1 in 35 LCLCs, of which 20 were classified as large cell neuroendocrine lung carcinomas (LCNEC) and 15 as large cell non-neuroendocrine lung carcinomas (LCNNEC). The extent of apoptosis was determined by detecting and counting the relative and absolute numbers of apoptotic cells and bodies using in situ 3 -end labelling of the apoptotic DNA. The extent and intensity of expression of the bcl-2, bax, bak and mcl-1 proteins were studied by immunohistochemistry. Also the relative volume density of necrosis was evaluated and correlated with the other parameters. Finally, all the parameters were evaluated as prognostic markers and correlated with data on the survival of the patients. Relatively high apoptotic indices were seen in both tumor types (average for both 2.53%, range 0.09 27.01%). Significantly higher bcl-2 and bak indices were detected more often in LCNECs than in LCNNECs. Immunohistochemically detected bax, bcl-2 and bak expression was independent of apoptotic index in both tumor types, while there was a statistically significant positive association between mcl-1 expression and apoptotic index in LCNNEC but not in LCNEC. There was a statistically significant association between high apoptotic index and shortened survival in LCLC. However, no association was found between tumor stage and apoptosis. The patients with LCNEC and low bcl-2 protein expression had a significantly shorter survival time than those with high bcl-2 indices. There was also a clear association between shortened survival and necrotic LCNNEC. LCLCs show relatively high apoptotic activity, which is associated with shortened survival. The expression of bcl-2, bak and mcl- 1 is associated with neuroendocrine differentiation in LCLC. Finally, our results support some previous reports suggesting that bcl-2 expression in combination with some other markers involved in apoptosis and/or proliferation may be of prognostic value in cases of lung carcinoma with neuroendocrine differentiation.
PubMed ID
10491014 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adrenal suppression in asthmatic children receiving low-dose inhaled budesonide: comparison between dry powder inhaler and pressurized metered-dose inhaler attached to a spacer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15304
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2002 Dec;89(6):566-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Shmuel Goldberg
Tsurit Einot
Nurit Algur
Shimshon Schwartz
Alan C Greenberg
Elie Picard
Dov Virgilis
Eitan Kerem
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Respiratory Medicine, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Hebrew University Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel.
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2002 Dec;89(6):566-71
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorption
Administration, Inhalation
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex - secretion
Aerosols
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - pharmacology
Biological Availability
Budesonide - administration & dosage - adverse effects - pharmacology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Cross-Over Studies
Depression, Chemical
Female
Humans
Hydrocortisone - secretion - urine
Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System - drug effects
Inhalation Spacers
Lung - metabolism
Male
Pituitary-Adrenal System - drug effects
Powders
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Dry powder inhalers (DPI) have in recent years become a common mode for administration of inhaled corticosteroids for preventive therapy of asthma. Inhaled steroids delivered by DPI achieve increased lung deposition compared with pressurized metered-dose inhalers (pMDI), which is associated with increased therapeutic effect. This may be associated with increased systemic absorption. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of adrenal suppression in children using low-dose budesonide given by DPI, as compared with pMDI attached to a large-volume spacer device (pMDI + spacer). METHODS: In an open-labeled crossover study, 15 asthmatic children aged 5 to 15 years received 200 microg of inhaled budesonide twice daily by DPI (Turbuhaler, Astra, Draco AB, Lund, Sweden) and by pMDI + spacer, 1 month each, in a randomized order. Twenty-four-hour urine collections were performed at baseline and at the end of each of the 2 months of the study period, and urinary cortisol and creatinine were measured. RESULTS: Baseline urinary cortisol:creatinine was 0.038 +/- 0.012 microg/mg, similar in both groups. After 1 month of DPI therapy, urinary cortisol:creatinine was reduced by 27 +/- 16% to 0.028 +/- 0.012 microg/mg (P = 0.018). Urinary cortisol:creatinine after 1 month of pMDI + spacer therapy was similar to baseline 0.037 +/- 0.019 microg/mg (P = 0.78). CONCLUSIONS: Treatment of asthmatic children with budesonide 400 microg daily given via a DPI for 1 month was associated with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis suppression. This effect was not observed with the same dose of budesonide administered via pMDI + spacer. This indicates that systemic absorption might be reduced with pMDI + spacer therapy.
Notes
Comment In: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2002 Dec;89(6):537-912487216
Comment In: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2003 Jun;90(6):674; author reply 674-512839330
PubMed ID
12487221 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aerial spraying of fenitrothion in forest programs: some problems and some solutions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243052
Source
Can J Physiol Pharmacol. 1982 Jul;60(7):1046-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1982
Author
D J Ecobichon
Source
Can J Physiol Pharmacol. 1982 Jul;60(7):1046-52
Date
Jul-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerosols
Animals
Canada
Environmental pollution - prevention & control
Female
Fenitrothion - toxicity
Humans
Insect control
Lung - metabolism
Male
Rats
Trees
Abstract
Annually, large tracts of forest in eastern Canada are sprayed aerially with insecticides (fenitrothion, aminocarb) in attempts to control an epidemic infestation by an indigenous forest pest, the spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana, Clemens). The massive size of the spraying programs, the anecdotal reports of human exposure, and the potential for hazard to human health have led one province. New Brunswick, to initiate and fund specific environmental and laboratory studies which will provide adequate data upon which the government can base realistic legislation to protect both the forests and the population. These studies have included some unique field analyses of aerial spray drift conducted by a research group from the National Research Council; comparative subchronic studies in rats of fenitrothion and a new formulation; a nose-only inhalation study of this formulation in rats; field testing of the formulation for drift characteristics. Ongoing research involves the subchronic testing of the emulsifying agents being used routinely in the new formulation and studies of a low-drift additive which will stabilize the particle size of the spray. On the basis of the results to date, the government has been able to modify spraying techniques and to establish realistic buffer zones around human habitation.
PubMed ID
7127208 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ageing and long-term smoking affects KL-6 levels in the lung, induced sputum and plasma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134530
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2011;11:22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Nobuhisa Ishikawa
Witold Mazur
Tuula Toljamo
Katri Vuopala
Mikko Rönty
Yasushi Horimasu
Nobuoki Kohno
Vuokko L Kinnula
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Pulmonary Division, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2011;11:22
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aging - metabolism
Bronchi - metabolism - pathology
Case-Control Studies
Epithelium - metabolism - pathology
Female
Finland
Humans
Lung - metabolism - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Mucin-1 - metabolism
Pulmonary Alveoli - metabolism - pathology
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - metabolism
Smoking - metabolism
Sputum - metabolism
Abstract
KL-6 is a high-molecular-weight glycoprotein classified as a human MUC1 mucin. It was hypothesized that KL-6 could be detectable in the circulating blood and especially in airway secretions in lung diseases associated with mucus production such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Additional aims of this study were to investigate whether the levels of KL-6 in plasma and sputum are related to ageing and smoking history.
The concentrations of KL-6 in plasma and induced sputum supernatants from young and/or middle aged/elderly non-smokers, smokers and patients with COPD were assayed by ELISA (n = 201). The subjects were classified into five groups according to age, smoking status and presence of COPD. In addition, KL-6 expression in control and diseased lung i.e. samples from patients with COPD (n = 28), were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and digital image analysis.
The plasma levels of KL-6 increased with age both in non-smokers and smokers. Among middle aged/elderly subjects, plasma KL-6 levels in all smokers regardless of COPD were significantly higher than in non-smokers, whereas sputum levels of KL-6 were significantly higher in COPD compared not only to non-smokers but also to smokers. KL-6 was more prominently expressed in the bronchiolar/alveolar epithelium in COPD than in the control lungs. Plasma and sputum KL-6 levels correlated inversely with obstruction and positively with smoking history and ageing. The linear multiple regression analysis confirmed that age and cigarette smoking had independent effects on plasma KL-6.
KL-6 increases with ageing and chronic smoking history, but prospective studies will be needed to elucidate the significance of KL-6 in chronic airway diseases.
Notes
Cites: Curr Drug Targets Inflamm Allergy. 2005 Aug;4(4):465-7016101523
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1997 Jul;156(1):109-159230733
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2006 Jul 1;174(1):6-1416556692
Cites: Respir Res. 2006;7:6916646959
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2006 Sep;28(3):523-3216611654
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2007 Jan;29(1):51-517050565
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2007 Sep 15;176(6):532-5517507545
Cites: COPD. 2007 Dec;4(4):321-918027159
Cites: J Pathol. 2008 Mar;214(4):456-6318072275
Cites: Thorax. 2008 May;63(5):402-718234906
Cites: Biomarkers. 2008 Jun;13(4):385-9218595202
Cites: Nihon Kokyuki Gakkai Zasshi. 2008 Nov;46(11):859-6319068756
Cites: Ther Adv Respir Dis. 2008 Dec;2(6):351-7419124382
Cites: Respirology. 2001 Jun;6 Suppl:S35-811438023
Cites: Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2001 Oct;25(4):397-40011694442
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 2):S76-8011734472
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2002 Feb 1;165(3):378-8111818324
Cites: Chest. 2002 May;121(5 Suppl):142S-150S12010843
Cites: Eur Respir J Suppl. 2002 Sep;37:3s-8s12361361
Cites: J Biol Chem. 2003 Sep 12;278(37):35458-6412826677
Cites: Chest. 2003 Sep;124(3):1060-612970038
Cites: Scand J Clin Lab Invest Suppl. 1982;159:5-206957974
Cites: Jpn J Clin Oncol. 1988 Sep;18(3):203-163411786
Cites: Chest. 1989 Jul;96(1):68-732661160
Cites: Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 1997 Oct;17(4):501-79376125
Cites: Chest. 2009 Feb;135(2):505-1219201713
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2008;3(4):585-60319281076
Cites: Respiration. 2009;78(2):209-1619252398
Cites: COPD. 2009 Aug;6(4):256-6219811384
Cites: J Am Chem Soc. 2009 Dec 2;131(47):17102-919899793
Cites: Sarcoidosis Vasc Diffuse Lung Dis. 2009 Jul;26(1):47-5319960788
Cites: Respirology. 2010 Feb;15(2):265-7120051048
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2010 Mar;28(1):41-620331388
Cites: Ann Med. 2010 Oct;42(7):512-2020662762
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1993 Sep;148(3):637-428368634
Cites: Lab Invest. 1995 Jul;73(1):3-197603038
Cites: Eur Respir J. 1996 Jun;9(6):1174-808804934
Cites: Lancet. 1997 May 17;349(9063):1436-429164317
Cites: Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2006 Apr;34(4):496-916357367
PubMed ID
21569324 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antimony in lung, liver and kidney tissue from deceased smelter workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27022
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1982 Sep;8(3):201-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1982
Author
L. Gerhardsson
D. Brune
G F Nordberg
P O Wester
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1982 Sep;8(3):201-8
Date
Sep-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antimony - metabolism - poisoning
Half-Life
Humans
Kidney - metabolism
Liver - metabolism
Lung - metabolism
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Neutron Activation Analysis
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Tissue concentrations of antimony in lung, liver, and kidney tissue from a group of deceased smelter workers from northern Sweden have been compared with those of a group of persons without occupational exposure from a nearby area. Neutron activation analysis was used to determine the antimony concentration of lung tissue from exposed workers; these concentrations were 12-fold higher than those of referents (p less than 0.001). For lung tissue there was no tendency towards decreased antimony concentrations with time (up to 20 a) after the cessation of exposure, and this result indicates a long biological half-time. The highest values were found for workers who had worked for many years at the roasters and in the arsenic and selenium departments. There was no significant difference between the antimony concentration of the lung tissue from workers who had died of lung cancer and those of persons who died of other malignancies, cardiovascular disease, or other causes. This finding does not however rule out the possibility of a role for antimony in the etiology of lung cancer among smelter workers since multiple factors may have been operating. The antimony concentration of the liver tissue and the kidney cortex did not differ from the corresponding values of the reference group; this finding indicates either a short biological half-time or insignificance for the systemic distribution of antimony.
PubMed ID
7156939 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association study between the CX3CR1 gene and asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166755
Source
Genes Immun. 2006 Dec;7(8):632-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
K. Tremblay
M. Lemire
V. Provost
T. Pastinen
Y. Renaud
A J Sandford
M. Laviolette
T J Hudson
C. Laprise
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Montreal Community Genomic Medicine Centre, Chicoutimi University Hospital, Saguenay, Québec, Canada.
Source
Genes Immun. 2006 Dec;7(8):632-9
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - genetics
Female
Gene Components
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Variation
Haplotypes - genetics
Humans
Linkage Disequilibrium
Lung - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Quebec
Receptors, Chemokine - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
CX3CR1, a fractalkine receptor, mediates cell-adhesive and migratory functions in inflammation. Based on CX3CR1 expression observed in bronchial tissues of asthmatic subjects, we hypothesized that genetic variation at this locus may affect susceptibility to asthma. We carried out an association study and a haplotypic analysis with selected polymorphisms of the CX3CR1 in a familial asthmatic sample from a founder population. Genetic analyses performed by FBAT software showed five CX3CR1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs938203, rs2669849, rs1050592, T280M and V249I) with significant associations between their common alleles and asthma (P
PubMed ID
17082760 View in PubMed
Less detail

Biologically active metals in human tissues. I. The effect of age and sex on the concentration of copper in aorta, heart, kidney, liver, lung, pancreas and skeletal muscle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248519
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1978 Jun;4(2):167-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1978
Author
E. Vuori
A. Huunan-Seppälä
J O Kilpiö
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1978 Jun;4(2):167-75
Date
Jun-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aorta - metabolism
Copper - analysis - metabolism
Finland
Humans
Kidney - metabolism
Liver - metabolism
Lung - metabolism
Muscles - metabolism
Myocardium - metabolism
Pancreas - metabolism
Sex Factors
Spectrophotometry, Atomic
Tissue Distribution
Abstract
Autopsy specimens of aorta, heart, kidney, liver, lung, pancreas and skeletal muscle were collected from 86 accident victims. The copper concentration in each tissue was determined with atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The descending order of the tissues in respect to copper concentration was: liver, heart, kidney, pancreas, lung, muscle, and aorta. No significant difference was found in the copper levels of samples from male and female autopsies. When the effect of age on the average copper concentration was studied, liver and kidney showed a decreasing concentration up to maturity, the copper concentration in pancreas and skeletal muscle showed a continuous decline with increasing age, and there was no clear-cut effect of age on the copper concentration of heart, lung and aorta. According to the results the Finnish population does not differ, on the average, from other populations with respect to tissue copper concentrations.
PubMed ID
684390 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cadmium and chromium as markers of smoking in human lung tissue.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67951
Source
Environ Res. 1989 Aug;49(2):197-207
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1989
Author
P. Pääkkö
P. Kokkonen
S. Anttila
P L Kalliomäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Environ Res. 1989 Aug;49(2):197-207
Date
Aug-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cadmium - analysis
Chromium - analysis
Humans
Lung - metabolism - radiography
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - metabolism
Abstract
The pulmonary cadmium (Cd) and chromium (Cr) contents from 45 decreased persons from Northern Finland were determined by plasma emission spectrometry (DCP-AES). These subjects did not have any malignant diseases or known occupational exposure to heavy metals. The pulmonary metal concentrations were compared with smoking history, pulmonary emphysema, age, and occupation. The mean Cd concentrations for the nonsmokers, smokers, and exsmokers were 0.4 (SD +/- 0.4), 3.0 (SD +/- 2.2), and 1.1 (SD +/- 1.0) micrograms/dry wt, and the corresponding values for Cr were 1.3 (SD +/- 0.9), 4.3 (SD +/- 3.3), and 4.8 (SD +/- 4.0) micrograms/g dry wt, respectively. The pulmonary Cr content increased with age and smoking time, but showed no connection with occupation. The Cd content was dependent only on smoking-related variables, increasing with the amount of tobacco smoked. The pulmonary Cd was seen to return to the level of nonsmokers in 21-22 years after cessation of smoking, whereas Cr showed no decreasing tendency with the time since smoking stopped.
PubMed ID
2753006 View in PubMed
Less detail

Characterization of a common susceptibility locus for asthma-related traits.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180651
Source
Science. 2004 Apr 9;304(5668):300-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-9-2004
Author
Tarja Laitinen
Anne Polvi
Pia Rydman
Johanna Vendelin
Ville Pulkkinen
Paula Salmikangas
Siru Mäkelä
Marko Rehn
Asta Pirskanen
Anna Rautanen
Marco Zucchelli
Harriet Gullstén
Marina Leino
Harri Alenius
Tuula Petäys
Tari Haahtela
Annika Laitinen
Catherine Laprise
Thomas J Hudson
Lauri A Laitinen
Juha Kere
Author Affiliation
GeneOS Limited, 00251 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Science. 2004 Apr 9;304(5668):300-4
Date
Apr-9-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Alternative Splicing
Animals
Asthma - genetics - metabolism
Bronchi - chemistry - cytology
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 7 - genetics
Epithelial Cells - chemistry
Female
Finland
Gene Expression
Genes
Genetic Linkage
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Haplotypes
Humans
Hypersensitivity - genetics - metabolism
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Inflammation - genetics
Lung - metabolism
Male
Mice
Myocytes, Smooth Muscle - chemistry
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Quebec
Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled - analysis - genetics
Abstract
Susceptibility to asthma depends on variation at an unknown number of genetic loci. To identify susceptibility genes on chromosome 7p, we adopted a hierarchical genotyping design, leading to the identification of a 133-kilobase risk-conferring segment containing two genes. One of these coded for an orphan G protein-coupled receptor named GPRA (G protein-coupled receptor for asthma susceptibility), which showed distinct distribution of protein isoforms between bronchial biopsies from healthy and asthmatic individuals. In three cohorts from Finland and Canada, single nucleotide polymorphism-tagged haplotypes associated with high serum immunoglobulin E or asthma. The murine ortholog of GPRA was up-regulated in a mouse model of ovalbumin-induced inflammation. Together, these data implicate GPRA in the pathogenesis of atopy and asthma.
Notes
Comment In: Science. 2004 Apr 9;304(5668):185-715073340
PubMed ID
15073379 View in PubMed
Less detail

64 records – page 1 of 7.