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11 records – page 1 of 2.

[Complex treatment of lumbosacral radiculitis in a rural locality]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74605
Source
Vrach Delo. 1976 Jan;(1):116-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1976

Cost-effectiveness analysis of sacral nerve stimulation as treatment for severe irritable bowel syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277217
Source
Colorectal Dis. 2016 Jan;18(1):O30-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
L S Tipsmark
J. Fassov
L. Lundby
S. Laurberg
L. Ehlers
K. Krogh
Source
Colorectal Dis. 2016 Jan;18(1):O30-6
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Electric Stimulation Therapy - economics
Humans
Irritable Bowel Syndrome - economics - therapy
Lumbosacral Plexus
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Early results from sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) for severe irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are promising but estimates of cost-effectiveness are lacking. Our object was to perform a cost-effectiveness analysis for SNS as an alternative to no treatment of IBS.
This retrospective analysis was based on the results from a randomized controlled crossover study with a cost-utility analysis performed on patient-level data and modelling of censored data over a projected period of time of up to 20 years. The analysis was conducted on an intention-to-treat approach. For estimation of the uncertainty of the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio a bias corrected bootstrap analysis was performed.
Cost-effectiveness was not reached for 4 years after permanent implantation (£31 270 per quality-adjusted life years), which was the upper limit for patient follow-up, but our data imply a cost-effectiveness from a 7-year perspective onwards.
The study indicates the SNS treatment for IBS is cost effective from a 7-year perspective onwards.
PubMed ID
26466156 View in PubMed
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Efficacy of sacral neuromodulation in treatment of bladder pain syndrome: long-term follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134641
Source
Neurourol Urodyn. 2011 Sep;30(7):1271-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Yahya Q Ghazwani
Mohamed S Elkelini
Magdy M Hassouna
Author Affiliation
Surgery/Urology, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. yahia_ghaz@hotmail.com
Source
Neurourol Urodyn. 2011 Sep;30(7):1271-5
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Cystitis, Interstitial - diagnosis - physiopathology - therapy
Electric Stimulation Therapy - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Lumbosacral Plexus
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pain Measurement
Patient Selection
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Urinary Bladder - innervation
Urodynamics
Abstract
This study was sought to evaluate the efficacy and durability of sacral neuromodulation in the treatment of bladder pain syndrome (BPS) patients.
A retrospective chart review was performed of patients who had unilateral sacral nerve stimulator (InterStim®) for refractory BPS between June 2002 and December 2004. Patients were qualified for permanent implantation by showing = 50% improvement in their bladder pain and voiding symptoms 1-week post-percutaneous nerve evaluation (PNE). Voiding diary was completed at pre-implantation, 1 year, and on the last visit. Urinary distress inventory short form was completed pre-implantation and on the last visit. Bladder pain was evaluated by visual analogue scale. Primary outcome was improvement in bladder pain. Differences among groups were compared by one-way ANOVA and t-test. Statistical significance was set at P = 0.05.
Twenty-one female patients diagnosed with BPS had PNE; 11 patients (52%) showed = 50% improvement in their bladder pain and voiding symptoms and they consider candidates for permanent implantation (Table I), while 10 patients (48%) failed to show 50% improvement in their voiding symptoms or bladder pain (Table II). In those 11 patients who underwent permanent implantation, the average patient's age was 44.3 ± 8.9 years; average time since diagnosis was 3 ± 0.8 years; the average follow- up was 71.5 ± 9.3 months (Table III). There was significant improvement in the bladder pain and voiding parameters at 1-year follow-up, which was maintained at 5-year follow-up. There was continuous improvement in urgency (1.2 ± 0.68) at 1-year follow-up, and (0.98 ± 0.72) at the last visit. Average voided volume was also continuously improved from 242 ± 62.7 ml at 1-year follow-up to 276 ± 64.7 ml on the last visit.
Sacral neuromodulation as part of multimodal treatment provides an effective long-term treatment option for sub-group of refractory BPS.
PubMed ID
21557299 View in PubMed
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[Experience in treating lumbosacral radiculitis with sinusoidal modulated currents in a complex with natural factors at Slavyansk Health Resort]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74628
Source
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 1975 May-Jun;(3):271-2
Publication Type
Article

First Scandinavian experience of electrical sacral nerve stimulation in the treatment of the overactive bladder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195824
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2000 Dec;34(6):366-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
C. Edlund
M. Hellström
R. Peeker
M. Fall
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2000 Dec;34(6):366-76
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Electric Stimulation Therapy - methods
Female
Humans
Lumbosacral Plexus
Male
Middle Aged
Scandinavia
Urinary Bladder Diseases - therapy
Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of electrical sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) in the treatment of urinary incontinence and urinary retention refractory to conservative treatment, and to assess the impact of urodynamic abnormalities and electrode position.
Thirty patients (10 men, 20 women) with a mean age of 59 years (range 21-79 years), all of whom had longstanding symptoms ranging from 2 to 46 years (mean 12.4 years), were subjected to a percutaneous test stimulation. Ten patients responded well, resulting in a permanent implant in nine patients. Electrode positions were determined by plain X-ray and computed tomography.
Radiologically, a variety of positions of the temporary electrodes was seen. In the implanted patients, long-term symptom reduction varied over time, ranging from total relief to partial or total recurrence of symptoms.
SNS is a new promising option for the treatment of urge incontinence. Refined instruments for proper patient selection and the optimal way to position the electrode remain to be developed.
PubMed ID
11195901 View in PubMed
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Lack of effect of sacral nerve stimulation for incontinence in patients with systemic sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273613
Source
Colorectal Dis. 2015 Oct;17(10):903-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
S K Butt
A. Alam
R. Cohen
K. Krogh
S. Buntzen
A. Emmanuel
Source
Colorectal Dis. 2015 Oct;17(10):903-7
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Electric Stimulation Therapy - methods
Fecal Incontinence - etiology - physiopathology - therapy
Female
Great Britain
Hospitals, University
Humans
Lumbosacral Plexus
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Scleroderma, Systemic - complications - diagnosis
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Failure
Abstract
Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multisystem disorder of unknown aetiology leading to the deposition of excessive connective tissue in the skin, blood vessels and internal organs. Gastrointestinal involvement occurs in 90% of cases and the prevalence of faecal incontinence (FI) is 38%. This study comprises the largest case series assessing the efficacy of sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) treatment for incontinence in this patient group.
A retrospective analysis on prospectively collected data was performed on all SSc patients from our two centres who had undergone SNS for FI.
Ten female patients of mean age of 54 (37-72) years had temporary SNS performed. The mean duration of FI was 13 (2-25) years. All had passive FI. Each patient had preprocedure anorectal physiology and endoanal ultrasound examinations documenting internal sphincter atrophy/fragmentation or reduced anal resting pressure. Overall there was no statistically significant difference (P = 0.57) in the total Wexner incontinence scores before (mean 15.1 ± 2.6 SD) and during temporary SNS procedures (mean 13.1 ± 3.6 SD). Two patients with a significant improvement went on to have permanent SNS with only one achieving a favourable outcome at 1 year.
This study showed that SNS failed to reduce episodes of leakage in nine out of 10 patients with systemic sclerosis affected with incontinence.
PubMed ID
25850948 View in PubMed
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[Late results of the treatment of secondary lumbosacral radiculitis at Siniak health resort]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74493
Source
Vrach Delo. 1979 Feb;(2):74-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1979

Sacral neuromodulation for faecal incontinence following obstetric sphincter injury - outcome of percutaneous nerve evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285758
Source
Colorectal Dis. 2017 Mar;19(3):274-282
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
M B Rydningen
T. Dehli
T. Wilsgaard
R O Lindsetmo
M. Kumle
M. Stedenfeldt
S. Norderval
Source
Colorectal Dis. 2017 Mar;19(3):274-282
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anal Canal - diagnostic imaging - injuries
Delivery, Obstetric - adverse effects
Electric Stimulation Therapy
Endosonography
Fecal Incontinence - etiology - therapy
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Lumbosacral Plexus
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Prospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Urinary Incontinence - etiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of percutaneous nerve evaluation (PNE) in women with faecal incontinence (FI) following obstetric anal sphincter injury and to relate the outcomes to baseline factors, with special emphasis on the extent of the sphincter defect.
This was a prospective study at a tertiary colorectal referral unit at the University Hospital of North Norway conducted from 2012 to 2014. Sixty-three women underwent a 3-week PNE using a tined lead and the Verify(®) external neurostimulator. The primary outcome was efficacy, defined as the percentage reduction in weekly FI episodes, and patients with a reduction of 50% or more were defined as responders. Baseline factors affecting the primary outcome were explored. Sphincter defects were classified with a validated three-dimensional endoanal ultrasound defect score.
Fifty-six (89%) of the 63 women were responders with a reduction in weekly FI episodes of 94.5%, from a median (interquartile range) of 4.8 (2.0-11.0) to 0.5 (0-2.0) (P 
PubMed ID
27463362 View in PubMed
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Sacral neuromodulation in urological indications: the Finnish experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139948
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2011 Feb;45(1):46-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Markku H Vaarala
Teuvo L J Tammela
Ilkka Perttilä
Pekka Luukkonen
Pekka Hellström
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. markku.vaarala@oulu.fi
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2011 Feb;45(1):46-51
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cystitis - physiopathology - therapy
Electric Stimulation Therapy - instrumentation - methods
Electrodes, Implanted
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lumbosacral Plexus - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Urinary Bladder, Overactive - physiopathology - therapy
Urinary Incontinence, Urge - physiopathology - therapy
Urinary Retention - physiopathology - therapy
Urination - physiology
Urine - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Sacral neuromodulation is a treatment modality for voiding dysfunction that is resistant to conventional medical and surgical treatments. In Finland, sacral neuromodulation has been used for the treatment of urgency-frequency syndrome, non-obstructive urinary retention and painful bladder/interstitial cystitis since 1996.
The investigation retrospectively evaluated 180 tested patients, 74 of whom underwent permanent implantation of the InterStim device.
A positive test result leading to implantation was significantly more frequent among females than males. Among urinary retention patients, the patients with a positive test leading to implantation were significantly younger than those without implantation. The implantation operation time was significantly shorter when using a tined lead device compared with open electrode insertion (76 vs 122 min). The mean follow-up time was 41 months (range 0-143). Significant improvement after implantation was noted in the mean urinated volumes and number of daily urinations, as well as in the number of catheterizations in urgency-frequency syndrome and urinary retention, respectively. The subjective long-term outcome was similar in these indications. Surgical revision was required for 15 patients (20.3% of implanted patients).
The difference in gender distribution compared with earlier published series may be explained by a selection bias due to the limited referrals of female patients from gynaecologists. The results favour the use of a tined lead device because of the shorter operating room time. Furthermore, the outcome seems to be more favourable among patients with a staged implant procedure compared with a one-stage operation with a tined lead device.
PubMed ID
20961268 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.