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61 records – page 1 of 7.

1991 Volvo Award in clinical sciences. Smoking and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration: an MRI study of identical twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65039
Source
Spine. 1991 Sep;16(9):1015-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1991
Author
M C Battié
T. Videman
K. Gill
G B Moneta
R. Nyman
J. Kaprio
M. Koskenvuo
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, University of Washington, Seattle.
Source
Spine. 1991 Sep;16(9):1015-21
Date
Sep-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Awards and Prizes
Comparative Study
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Intervertebral Disk Displacement - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Lumbar Vertebrae - pathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
The primary objective of this study was to determine whether disc degeneration, as assessed through magnetic resonance imaging, is greater in smokers than in nonsmokers. To control for the maximum number of potentially confounding variables, pairs of identical twins highly discordant for cigarette smoking were selected as study subjects. Data analyses revealed 18% greater mean disc degeneration scores in the lumbar spines of smokers as compared with nonsmokers. The effect was present across the entire lumbar spine, implicating a mechanism acting systemically. This investigation demonstrates the efficiency of using carefully selected controls in studying conditions of multifactorial etiology, such as disc degeneration.
PubMed ID
1948392 View in PubMed
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Adjacent level degeneration and facet arthropathy after disc prosthesis surgery or rehabilitation in patients with chronic low back pain and degenerative disc: second report of a randomized study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123374
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2012 Dec 1;37(25):2063-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2012
Author
Christian Hellum
Linda Berg
Øivind Gjertsen
Lars Gunnar Johnsen
Gesche Neckelmann
Kjersti Storheim
Anne Keller
Oliver Grundnes
Ansgar Espeland
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Oslo University Hospital and University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. christian.hellum@medisin.uio.no
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2012 Dec 1;37(25):2063-73
Date
Dec-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chronic Pain - diagnosis - etiology - rehabilitation - surgery - therapy
Disability Evaluation
Female
Humans
Intervertebral Disc - pathology - surgery
Intervertebral Disc Degeneration - diagnosis - etiology - rehabilitation - surgery - therapy
Low Back Pain - diagnosis - etiology - rehabilitation - surgery - therapy
Lumbar Vertebrae - pathology - surgery
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Pain Measurement
Postoperative Complications - etiology - pathology
Predictive value of tests
Sacrum - pathology - surgery
Time Factors
Total Disc Replacement - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Zygapophyseal Joint - pathology
Abstract
Randomized clinical trial with 2-year follow-up.
To assess the development of adjacent level degeneration (ALD) and index level facet arthropathy (FA) in patients treated with disc prosthesis compared with patients treated with rehabilitation.
There is controversy about the natural history of disc degeneration and the development of ALD and FA in patients who undergo disc prosthesis surgery.
The study included 116 patients with a history of low back pain for at least 1 year, Oswestry Disability Index 30 points or more, and degenerative changes in 1 or 2 lower lumbar spine levels. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed before treatment and at the 2-year follow-up. ALD and index level FA were determined on the basis of the majority assessment of 3, independent, experienced radiologists. ALD was assessed by evaluating Modic changes, posterior high intensity zone in the disc, nucleus pulposus signal, disc height, disc contour, and FA. Data were analyzed with Fischer exact test and t test.
ALD developed with similar frequencies in patients who were (n = 59) and were not (n = 57) treated with surgery. In patients treated with surgery, index level FA appeared or increased in 20 patients (34%) and decreased in 1 patient. In patients treated with rehabilitation, 2 (4%) had new or increased FA at the index/degenerated disc level and 1 had decreased FA (P
PubMed ID
22706091 View in PubMed
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Agreement in the interpretation of magnetic resonance images of the lumbar spine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151073
Source
Acta Radiol. 2009 Jun;50(5):497-506
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
F M Kovacs
A. Royuela
T S Jensen
A. Estremera
G. Amengual
A. Muriel
I. Galarraga
C. Martínez
E. Arana
H. Sarasíbar
R M Salgado
V. Abraira
O. López
C. Campillo
M T Gil del Real
J. Zamora
Author Affiliation
Departamento Científico, Fundación Kovacs, Palma de Majorca, Spain. kovacs@kovacs.org
Source
Acta Radiol. 2009 Jun;50(5):497-506
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Female
Humans
Lumbar Vertebrae - pathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods - statistics & numerical data
Male
Observer Variation
Reproducibility of Results
Severity of Illness Index
Spain
Spinal Diseases - diagnosis
Supine Position
Abstract
Correlation between clinical features and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings is essential in low-back-pain patients. Most previous studies have analyzed concordance in the interpretation of lumbar MRI among a few radiologists who worked together. This may have overestimated concordance.
To evaluate intra- and interobserver agreement in the interpretation of lumbar MRI performed in an open 0.2 T system.
Seven radiologists from two different geographic settings in Spain interpreted the lumbar MRIs of 50 subjects representative of the general Danish population aged 40 years. The radiologists interpreted the images in routine clinical practice, having no knowledge of the clinical and demographic characteristics of the subjects and blinded to their colleagues' assessments. Six of the radiologists evaluated the same MRIs 14 days later, having no knowledge of the previous results. Data on the existence of disc degeneration, high-intensity zones, disc contour, Schmorl nodes, Modic changes, osteophytes, spondylolisthesis, and spinal stenosis were collected in the Nordic Modic Consensus Group Classification form. Intra- and interobserver agreement was analyzed for variables with a prevalence >or=10% and
PubMed ID
19431057 View in PubMed
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Anatomical and clinical studies on lumbar disc degeneration. 1950.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14432
Source
Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1992 Jun;(279):3-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1992
Author
S. Friberg
C. Hirsch
Source
Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1992 Jun;(279):3-7
Date
Jun-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
History, 20th Century
Humans
Lumbar Vertebrae - pathology
Portraits
Spinal Osteophytosis - history - pathology
Sweden
PubMed ID
1600669 View in PubMed
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An epidemiologic study of MRI and low back pain in 13-year-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29799
Source
Spine. 2005 Apr 1;30(7):798-806
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2005
Author
Per Kjaer
Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde
Joan Solgaard Sorensen
Tom Bendix
Author Affiliation
The Back Research Center, Backcenter Funen and University of Southern Denmark, Lindevej, Denmark. pkrj@shf.fyns-amt.dk
Source
Spine. 2005 Apr 1;30(7):798-806
Date
Apr-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Low Back Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Lumbar Vertebrae - pathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Abstract
STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional cohort study of a general population. OBJECTIVE: To describe associations between "abnormal" lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and low back pain (LBP) in 13-year old children. SUMMARY AND BACKGROUND DATA: Very little is known about the distribution of lumbar MRI findings and how they are associated with LBP in youngsters. METHODS: Disc abnormalities, as well as nerve root compromise, endplate changes, and anterolisthesis were identified from MRI studies of 439 children. LBP was identified from structured interviews. Associations are presented as odds ratios (OR). RESULTS: Signs of disc degeneration were noted in approximately 1/3 of the subjects. Reduced signal intensity and irregular nucleus shape in the upper 3 lumbar discs were significantly associated with LBP within the last month (OR, 2.5-3.6), whereas reduced signal intensity and disc protrusion at L5-NS1 were associated with seeking care (OR, 2.8 and 7.7, respectively). Endplate changes in relation to the L3 discs were associated with LBP month and seeking care (OR, between 9.7 and 22.2). Anterolisthesis at L5 was associated with seeking care (OR, 4.3). There were obvious differences between genders: degenerative disc changes in the upper lumbar spine were more strongly associated with LBP in boys, while disc abnormalities in the lower lumbar spine were more strongly associated with seeking care in girls. CONCLUSIONS: In children, degenerative disc findings are relatively common, and some are associated with LBP. There appears to be a gender difference. Disc protrusions, endplate changes, and anterolisthesis in the lumbar spine were strongly associated with seeking care for LBP.
PubMed ID
15803084 View in PubMed
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Appropriateness of lumbar spine referrals to a neurosurgical service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139463
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2010 Nov;37(6):843-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Nathan Deis
J Max Findlay
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Division of Neurosurgery, University of Alberta Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2010 Nov;37(6):843-8
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Female
Humans
Lumbar Vertebrae - pathology - surgery
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Male
Neurosurgical Procedures - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Tomography Scanners, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
Patients with lumbar spine complaints are often referred for surgical assessment. Only those with clinical and radiological evidence of nerve root compression are potential candidates for surgery and appropriate for surgical assessment. This study examines the appropriateness of lumbar spine referrals made to neurosurgeons in Edmonton, Alberta.
Lumbar spine referrals to a group of ten neurosurgeons at the University of Alberta were reviewed over three two month intervals. Clinical criteria for "appropriateness" for surgical assessment were as follows: •"Appropriate" referrals were those that stated leg pain was the chief complaint, or those that described physical exam evidence of neurological deficit, and imaging reports (CT or MRI) were positive for nerve root compression. •"Uncertain" referrals were those that reported both back and leg pain without specifying which was greater, without mention of neurologic deficit, and when at least possible nerve root compression was reported on imaging. •"Inappropriate" referrals contained no mention of leg symptoms or signs of neurological deficit, and/or had no description of nerve root compression on imaging.
Of the 303 referrals collected, 80 (26%) were appropriate, 92 (30%) were uncertain and 131 (44%) were inappropriate for surgical assessment.
Physicians seeking specialist consultations for patients with lumbar spine complaints need to be better informed of the criteria which indicate an appropriate referral for surgical treatment, namely clinical and radiological evidence of nerve root compression. Avoiding inappropriate referrals could reduce wait-times for both surgical consultation and lumbar spine surgery for those patients requiring it.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Neurol Sci. 2010 Nov;37(6):719-2021059531
PubMed ID
21059549 View in PubMed
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Are the determinants of vertebral endplate changes and severe disc degeneration in the lumbar spine the same? A magnetic resonance imaging study in middle-aged male workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86496
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2008;9:51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Kuisma Mari
Karppinen Jaro
Haapea Marianne
Niinimäki Jaakko
Ojala Risto
Heliövaara Markku
Korpelainen Raija
Kaikkonen Kaisu
Taimela Simo
Natri Antero
Tervonen Osmo
Author Affiliation
Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. mari.kuisma@fimnet.fi
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2008;9:51
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Intervertebral Disk - pathology
Intervertebral Disk Displacement - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Lumbar Vertebrae - pathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Vibration - adverse effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Modic changes are bone marrow lesions visible in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and they are assumed to be associated with symptomatic intervertebral disc disease, especially changes located at L5-S1. Only limited information exists about the determinants of Modic changes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the determinants of vertebral endplate (Modic) changes, and whether they are similar for Modic changes and severe disc degeneration focusing on L5-S1 level. METHODS: 228 middle-aged male workers (159 train engineers and 69 sedentary factory workers) from northern Finland underwent sagittal T1- and T2-weighted MRI. Modic changes and disc degeneration were analyzed from the scans. The participants responded to a questionnaire including items of occupational history and lifestyle factors. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the associations between selected determinants (age, lifetime exercise, weight-related factors, fat percentage, smoking, alcohol use, lifetime whole-body vibration) and Modic type I and II changes, and severe disc degeneration (= grade V on Pfirrmann's classification). RESULTS: The prevalences of the Modic changes and severe disc degeneration were similar in the occupational groups. Age was significantly associated with all degenerative changes. In the age-adjusted analyses, only weight-related determinants (BMI, waist circumference) were associated with type II changes. Exposure to whole-body vibration, besides age, was the only significant determinant for severe disc degeneration. In the multivariate model, BMI was associated with type II changes at L5-S1 (OR 2.75 per one SD = 3 unit increment in BMI), and vibration exposure with severe disc degeneration at L5-S1 (OR 1.08 per one SD = 11-year increment in vibration exposure). CONCLUSION: Besides age, weight-related factors seem important in the pathogenesis of Modic changes, whereas whole-body vibration was the only significant determinant of severe disc degeneration.
PubMed ID
18416819 View in PubMed
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Assessment of autonomic function after acute spinal cord injury using heart rate variability analyses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265934
Source
Spinal Cord. 2015 Jan;53(1):54-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
L. Malmqvist
T. Biering-Sørensen
K. Bartholdy
A. Krassioukov
K-L Welling
J H Svendsen
A. Kruse
B. Hansen
F. Biering-Sørensen
Source
Spinal Cord. 2015 Jan;53(1):54-8
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Autonomic Nervous System Diseases - diagnosis - etiology
Cervical Vertebrae - pathology
Denmark
Female
Fourier Analysis
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Linear Models
Lumbar Vertebrae - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Spinal Cord Injuries - classification - complications
Thoracic Vertebrae - pathology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Spinal cord injury (SCI) often results in severe dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system. C1-C8 SCI affects the supraspinal control to the heart, T1-T5 SCI affects the spinal sympathetic outflow to the heart, and T6-T12 SCI leaves sympathetic control to the heart intact. Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis can serve as a surrogate measure of autonomic regulation. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in HRV patterns and alterations in patients with acute traumatic SCI.
As soon as possible after SCI patients who met the inclusion criteria had 24?h Holter monitoring of their cardiac rhythm, additional Holter monitoring were performed 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks after SCI.
Fifty SCI patients were included. A significant increase in standard deviation of the average normal-to-normal (SDANN) sinus intervals was seen in the first month after injury (P=0.008). The increase was only significant in C1-T5 incomplete patients and in patients who did not experience one or more episodes of cardiac arrest. Significant lower values of Low Frequency Power, Total Power and the Low Frequency over High Frequency ratio were seen in the C1-T5 SCI patients compared with T6-T12 SCI patients.
The rise in SDANN in the incomplete C1-T5 patients could be due to spontaneous functional recovery caused by synaptic plasticity or remodelling of damaged axons. That the autonomic nervous system function differs between C1-C8, T1-T5 and T6-T12 patients suggest that the sympathovagal balance in both the C1-C8 and T1-T5 SCI patients has yet to be reached.
PubMed ID
25403499 View in PubMed
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The association between Modic changes and pain during 1-year follow-up in patients with lumbar radicular pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261592
Source
Skeletal Radiol. 2014 Sep;43(9):1271-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Elina Iordanova Schistad
Ansgar Espeland
Lars Jørgen Rygh
Cecilie Røe
Johannes Gjerstad
Source
Skeletal Radiol. 2014 Sep;43(9):1271-9
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Comorbidity
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intervertebral Disc Displacement - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Low Back Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Lumbar Vertebrae - pathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - statistics & numerical data
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Pain Measurement - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Radiculopathy - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Sex Distribution
Statistics as Topic
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To examine whether Modic changes influence pain during a 1-year follow-up in patients with lumbar radicular pain.
A total of 243 patients with lumbar radicular pain due to disc herniation were recruited from two hospitals in Norway and followed up at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months. On baseline lumbar magnetic resonance images, two observers independently evaluated Modic changes (types I-III; craniocaudal size 0-3). Outcomes were sensory pain (McGill Pain Questionnaire), back and leg pain (visual analogue scale, VAS). Association between Modic type and outcomes was explored with a mixed model and then by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) at each time point with Modic and treatment groups (surgical, n?=?126; nonsurgical, n?=?117) as fixed factors, adjusted for disc degeneration, age, sex, smoking, and duration of radicular pain. Modic size was also analyzed using ANOVA.
Pain scores had decreased significantly at 1-year follow-up. Modic type was significantly related to McGill sensory scores (mixed model: p?=?0.014-0.026; ANOVA: p?=?0.007 at 6 weeks), but not to VAS back pain or VAS leg pain scores. At 6 weeks, the mean McGill sensory score was higher in Modic I than in Modic II-III patients (p?=?0.003) and in patients without Modic changes (p?=?0.018). Modic size L1-S1 was not associated with pain outcomes.
Patients with lumbar radicular pain have a substantial pain reduction during 1-year follow-up, but Modic type I changes may imply a slower initial decrease in sensory pain.
PubMed ID
24965739 View in PubMed
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Association of larger holes in the trabecular bone at the distal radius in postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes mellitus compared to controls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128269
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2012 Jan;64(1):83-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Janet M Pritchard
Lora M Giangregorio
Stephanie A Atkinson
Karen A Beattie
Dean Inglis
George Ioannidis
Zubin Punthakee
J D Adachi
Alexandra Papaioannou
Author Affiliation
McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2012 Jan;64(1):83-91
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Aged
Bone Density
Case-Control Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - pathology - radiography
Female
Femur Neck - pathology - radiography
Fractures, Bone - etiology - pathology
Humans
Linear Models
Lumbar Vertebrae - pathology - radiography
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Odds Ratio
Ontario
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - complications - pathology - radiography
Radius - pathology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
Adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) have an elevated fracture risk despite normal areal bone mineral density (aBMD). The study objective was to compare trabecular bone microarchitecture of postmenopausal women with type 2 DM and women without type 2 DM.
An extremity 1T magnetic resonance imaging system was used to acquire axial images (195 × 195 × 1,000 µm(3) voxel size) of the distal radius of women recruited from outpatient clinics or by community advertisement. Image segmentation yielded geometric, topologic, and stereologic outcomes, i.e., number and size of trabecular bone network holes (marrow spaces), endosteal area, trabecular bone volume fraction, nodal and branch density, and apparent trabecular thickness, separation, and number. Lumbar spine (LS) and proximal femur BMD were measured with dual x-ray absorptiometry. Microarchitectural differences were assessed using linear regression and adjusted for percent body fat, ethnicity, timed up-and-go test, Charlson Index, and calcium and vitamin D intake; aBMD differences were adjusted for body mass index (BMI).
Women with type 2 DM (n = 30, mean ± SD age 71.0 ± 4.8 years) had larger holes (+13.3%; P = 0.001) within the trabecular bone network than women without type 2 DM (n = 30, mean ± SD age 70.7 ± 4.9 years). LS aBMD was greater in women with type 2 DM; however, after adjustment for BMI, LS aBMD did not differ between groups.
In women with type 2 DM, the average hole size within the trabecular bone network at the distal radius is greater compared to controls. This may explain the elevated fracture risk in this population.
Notes
Erratum In: Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2012 Jun;64(6):944
PubMed ID
22213724 View in PubMed
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61 records – page 1 of 7.