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Body composition and adipokines in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and systemic glucocorticoids.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271116
Source
Clin Exp Rheumatol. 2015 Nov-Dec;33(6):924-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
K. Markula-Patjas
H. Valta
M. Pekkinen
S. Andersson
K. Aalto
P. Lahdenne
H. Viljakainen
O. Mäkitie
Source
Clin Exp Rheumatol. 2015 Nov-Dec;33(6):924-30
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon - methods
Adiponectin - blood
Arthritis, Juvenile - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Body Composition - drug effects
Bone Density - drug effects
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Glucocorticoids - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Humans
Leptin - blood
Lumbar Vertebrae - metabolism - radiography
Male
Patient Acuity
Statistics as Topic
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore body composition, and the relationship of serum adipokines with bone mass and disease activity, in a cohort of JIA patients with at least three months' exposure to systemic glucocorticoids (GC).
Fifty patients with JIA (34 girls, median age 12.4 years and disease duration 6.3 years) and 88 controls matched for gender and age participated in this study. Bone mineral content (BMC) and areal bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine and whole body, as well as body composition were assessed with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Fasting serum leptin and adiponectin were measured.
Fat and lean mass were similar between patients and controls, but patients had slightly decreased BMD Z-scores. Serum leptin and adiponectin concentrations were similar. Disease activity was low, and no correlation with adipokines was observed. Patients with bone age-corrected lumbar spine BMD Z-score =-1.0 ("low BMD") did not show alterations in body composition, GC exposure or current disease activity, but had decreased BMC-to-lean mass ratio (p
PubMed ID
26315132 View in PubMed
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Bone mineral density in femoral neck is positively correlated to circulating insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-3 in Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190890
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2002 Jan;70(1):22-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
P. Gillberg
H. Olofsson
H. Mallmin
W F Blum
S. Ljunghall
A G Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, University Hospital, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2002 Jan;70(1):22-9
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Bone Density
Femur Neck - metabolism - radiography
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis
Lumbar Vertebrae - metabolism - radiography
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
Studies on the hormonal regulation of bone metabolism in men have indicated covariation between insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and sex hormones with bone mineral density (BMD). In this study the relationships between BMD in total body, lumbar spine, femoral neck, distal and ultradistal (UD) radius and circulating levels of IGFs, IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs), and sex steroids were investigated in 55 Swedish men between 22 and 85 (52 +/- 18, mean +/- SD) years of age. BMD in total body, distal and UD radius, and femoral neck was positively correlated with serum IGF-I (r = 0.31 to 0.49), IGF-II (r = 0.32 to 0.48), IGFBP-3 (r = 0.37 to 0.53), and free androgen index (FAI) (r = 0.32 to 0.40), and negatively with IGFBP-1 (r = -0.37 to -0.41) and IGFBP-2 (r = -0.29 to -0.41) levels. A positive correlation was observed between BMD in femoral neck and estradiol/SHBG ratio (r = 0.34, P = 0.01). Age correlated negatively with serum IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3, FAI, estradiol/SHBG ratio, and BMD in total body, distal and UD radius, and femoral neck, and positively with IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2, and SHBG levels. According to stepwise multiple regression analyses, a combination of weight, IGFBP-3, and testosterone accounted for 43% of the variation in BMD in femoral neck, 34% in ultradistal radius and 48% in total body (P
PubMed ID
11907704 View in PubMed
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Bone mineral density in women and men with early rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14006
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2001;30(4):213-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
C. Keller
I. Hafström
B. Svensson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Helsingborgs lasarett, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2001;30(4):213-20
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - metabolism
Bone Density - physiology
Densitometry, X-Ray
Female
Femur - metabolism - radiography
Hospitals, University
Humans
Lumbar Vertebrae - metabolism - radiography
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - epidemiology - metabolism
Reference Standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: Dual x-ray absorptiometry was performed in 227 patients, 149 women and 78 men, with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of no more than 12 months duration. RESULTS: Women, as well as men above 60 years of age, had a BMD at spine and hip comparable with age and sex matched reference populations. Men younger than 60 years had a tendency to lower BMD. Although the proportion of female patients with osteoporosis was not higher than in the reference, population the proportion of patients with reduced bone mass was increased, and this was found also in men. There was no significant association between BMD and disease duration, disease activity or disability. CONCLUSION: Untreated patients with early RA have a BMD in spine and hip not significantly different from that of normal reference populations. However, an increased number of the patients had reduced bone mass already at disease onset.
PubMed ID
11578016 View in PubMed
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Interaction of nutritional calcium and HRT in prevention of postmenopausal bone loss: a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183255
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2003 Jun;72(6):659-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
J. Sirola
H. Kröger
L. Sandini
M. Tuppurainen
J S Jurvelin
S. Saarikoski
R. Honkanen
Author Affiliation
Research Institute of Public Health, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland. jsirola@hytti.uku.fi
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2003 Jun;72(6):659-65
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Bone Density - physiology
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Femur Neck - metabolism - radiography
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Lumbar Vertebrae - metabolism - radiography
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - epidemiology - metabolism - prevention & control
Postmenopause
Prospective Studies
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the interactive effects between nutritional calcium (Ca) intake and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on bone loss. The study population, 937 peri- and postmenopausal women, was selected from a random sample (n = 2025) of the OSTPRE-study cohort (n = 13,100) in Kuopio, Finland. Of them, 545 women had never used HRT and 392 women reported its use during the follow-up period of 6 years. Women were divided in groups according to self-reported daily nutritional Ca intake (mg/day): 927 (3rd). Bone mineral density of the lumbar spine and femoral neck was measured with dual X-ray absorptiometry at baseline in 1989-91 and at the 5-year follow-up in 1994-97. According to analysis of variance, there were no statistically significant differences in annual bone loss rate between Ca intake tertiles in HRT never users. In HRT users the annual bone loss at the femoral neck was significantly lower in the third tertile than in the second and first tertiles. In a linear regression model, Ca intake prevented femoral bone loss in HRT users (P
PubMed ID
14562993 View in PubMed
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