Skip header and navigation

Refine By

14 records – page 1 of 2.

Chronic upper extremity pain and co-occurring symptoms in a general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71236
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2003 Oct 15;49(5):697-702
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2003
Author
Christina Gummesson
Isam Atroshi
Charlotte Ekdahl
Ragnar Johnsson
Ewald Ornstein
Author Affiliation
Hässleholm-Kristianstad Hospitals, Kristianstad University, Lund, Sweden. gunmmesson@sjukgym.lu.se
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2003 Oct 15;49(5):697-702
Date
Oct-15-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Chronic Disease
Female
Health status
Humans
Hypesthesia - complications - epidemiology
Low Back Pain - complications - epidemiology
Lower Extremity - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - complications - epidemiology
Pain - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Upper Extremity - physiopathology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of self reported chronic upper extremity pain associated with physical impairment in a general population, and its co-occurrence with chronic upper extremity numbness or tingling and chronic pain at other locations. METHODS: A general health questionnaire was mailed to 3,000 persons (age 25-74 years) who were randomly selected from a general population register. RESULTS: The response rate was 83%. The prevalence of chronic upper extremity pain associated with physical impairment was 20.8% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 19.2-22.5), and that of co-occurring numbness or tingling was 6.7% (95% CI 5.7-7.7). Among the responders with chronic upper extremity pain associated with physical impairment, 84% reported more than 1 painful area. CONCLUSION: Chronic upper extremity pain associated with physical impairment and co-occurring chronic upper extremity numbness or tingling were common in the general population. The presence of more than 1 location for pain in the upper extremity as well as in other parts of the body was frequent.
PubMed ID
14558056 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical signs of temporomandibular disorders and various pain conditions among children 6 to 8 years of age: the PANIC study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127471
Source
J Orofac Pain. 2012;26(1):17-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Anu Vierola
Anna Liisa Suominen
Tiina Ikavalko
Niina Lintu
Virpi Lindi
Hanna-Maaria Lakka
Jari Kellokoski
Matti Narhi
Timo A Lakka
Author Affiliation
University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
Source
J Orofac Pain. 2012;26(1):17-25
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Back Pain - epidemiology
Child
Facial Pain - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Headache - epidemiology
Humans
Lower Extremity - physiopathology
Male
Mandible - physiopathology
Masticatory Muscles - physiopathology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiopathology
Musculoskeletal Pain - epidemiology
Neck Pain - epidemiology
Office visits - statistics & numerical data
Pain Measurement
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Shoulder Pain - epidemiology
Sound
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine the prevalence and significance of clinically determined signs of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and pain in different parts of the body as well as the frequency, intensity, and other features of pain in children.
The subjects were a population-based sample of children 6 to 8 years of age. Complete data on clinical signs of TMD were available for 483 children. Data on pain during the past 3 months, assessed by a questionnaire administered by parents, were available for 424 children. Differences between the prevalence of at least one sign of TMD and the location or frequency of pain were evaluated using the chi-square test, as well as the associations between the prevalence, frequency, and location of pain and gender, the use of medication, and visits to a physician. The relationship of various pain conditions with the risk of having clinical signs of TMD was analyzed using logistic regression.
Of the 483 children, 171 (35%) had at least one clinical sign of TMD. Of the 424 children, 226 (53%) had experienced pain during the past 3 months. Pain was most prevalent in the lower limbs (35%) and head (32%). Of the 226 children with pain, 119 (53%) had experienced frequent pain (= once a week). No gender differences were found. The risk of having at least one clinical sign of TMD was 3.0 (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 1.1-8.5, P
PubMed ID
22292136 View in PubMed
Less detail

Co-occurrence of musculoskeletal pain among female kitchen workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169318
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2006 Nov;80(2):141-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Eija Haukka
Päivi Leino-Arjas
Svetlana Solovieva
Riikka Ranta
Eira Viikari-Juntura
Hilkka Riihimäki
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Centre of Expertise for Health and Work Ability, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, 00250, Helsinki, Finland. Eija.Haukka@ttl.fi
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2006 Nov;80(2):141-8
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arm - physiopathology
Comorbidity
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Industry
Human Engineering - methods
Humans
Low Back Pain - epidemiology - prevention & control
Lower Extremity - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Neck Pain - epidemiology - prevention & control
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pain - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prevalence
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Shoulder Pain - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The co-occurrence of musculoskeletal pain symptoms in seven body sites and their combinations among women in kitchen work were studied.
Data on musculoskeletal pain during the past 3 months in the neck, shoulders, forearms/hands, low back, hips, knees and ankles/feet were gathered by questionnaire from 495 female workers (mean age 45 years) in connection with an ergonomic intervention study in municipal kitchens of four cities in Finland. Altogether 122 kitchens (60% of those eligible) participated in the study. The response rate in the participating kitchens was 98%.
The 3-month prevalence of any musculoskeletal pain was 87%, the most common sites being the neck (71%), low back (50%) and forearms/hands (49%). About 73% of the subjects had pain in at least two, 36% in four or more, and 10% in 6-7 sites. In pair wise comparisons, e.g. neck pain was associated with pain in other sites with prevalence ratios (PR) varying from 1.3 to 1.6, and ankle or foot pain with ratios between 1.9 and 2.4. The seven pain symptoms occurred in more than 80 different combinations. When the co-occurrence of pain was studied in three larger anatomical areas, i.e. any pain in the axial (neck and low back), upper limb and lower limb areas, subjects reporting concurrent pain in all three were the largest category (36% of the respondents). Altogether 53% of the workers reported pain in at least the axial and upper limb areas, and 48% in at least the axial and lower limb areas.
Widespread co-occurrence of musculoskeletal pain symptoms was common among female kitchen workers with slight predominance in the upper body.
PubMed ID
16688464 View in PubMed
Less detail

Diagnostic imaging practice guidelines for musculoskeletal complaints in adults--an evidence-based approach. Part 1. Lower extremity disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159785
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2007 Nov-Dec;30(9):684-717
Publication Type
Article
Author
André E Bussières
John A M Taylor
Cynthia Peterson
Author Affiliation
Chiropractic Department, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Québec, Canada. andre.bussieres@uqtr.ca
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2007 Nov-Dec;30(9):684-717
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Chiropractic - standards
Evidence-Based Medicine - standards
Female
Humans
Lower Extremity - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - diagnosis
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Total Quality Management
United States
Abstract
The aim of this study was to develop evidence-based diagnostic imaging practice guidelines to assist chiropractors and other primary care providers in decision making for the appropriate use of diagnostic imaging of lower extremity disorders.
A comprehensive search of the English and French language literature was conducted using a combination of subject headings and keywords. The quality of the citations was assessed using the Quality of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS), the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation (AGREE), and the Stroke Prevention and Educational Awareness Diffusion (SPREAD) evaluation tools. The Referral Guidelines for Imaging (Radiation Protection 118) coordinated by the European Commission served as the initial template. The first draft was sent for external review. A Delphi panel composed of international experts on the topic of musculoskeletal disorders in chiropractic radiology, clinical sciences, and research were invited to review and propose recommendations on the indications for diagnostic imaging. The guidelines were pilot tested and peer reviewed by field chiropractors, and by chiropractic and medical specialists. Recommendations were graded according to the strength of the evidence.
Recommendations for diagnostic imaging guidelines of adult lower extremity disorders are provided, supported by more than 174 primary and secondary citations. Except for trauma, the overall quality of available literature is low. On average, 57 Delphi panelists completed 1 of 2 rounds, reaching more than 83% agreement on all 56 recommendations. Peer review by specialists reflected high levels of agreement, perceived ease of use of guidelines, and implementation feasibility.
The guidelines are intended to be used in conjunction with sound clinical judgment and experience and should be updated regularly. Dissemination and implementation strategies are discussed. Future research is needed to validate their content.
PubMed ID
18082743 View in PubMed
Less detail

Do Associations Between Perceived Environmental and Individual Characteristics and Walking Limitations Depend on Lower Extremity Performance Level?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291084
Source
J Aging Health. 2017 Jun; 29(4):640-656
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Ritva Sakari
Merja Rantakokko
Erja Portegijs
Susanne Iwarsson
Sarianna Sipilä
Anne Viljanen
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
1 University of Jyvaskyla, Finland.
Source
J Aging Health. 2017 Jun; 29(4):640-656
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Environment
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Independent living
Interviews as Topic
Lower Extremity - physiopathology
Male
Mobility Limitation
Perception
Physical Fitness - physiology
Sweden
Task Performance and Analysis
Walking - physiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to analyze whether the associations between perceived environmental and individual characteristics and perceived walking limitations in older people differ between those with intact and those with poorer lower extremity performance.
Persons aged 75 to 90 ( N = 834) participated in interviews and performance tests in their homes. Standard questionnaires were used to obtain walking difficulties; environmental barriers to and, facilitators of, mobility; and perceived individual hindrances to outdoor mobility. Lower extremity performance was tested using Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB).
Among those with poorer lower extremity performance, the likelihood for advanced walking limitations was, in particular, related to perceived poor safety in the environment, and among those with intact performance to perceived social issues, such as lack of company, as well as to long distances.
The environmental correlates of walking limitations seem to depend on the level of lower extremity performance.
PubMed ID
27056910 View in PubMed
Less detail

Intra-rater reliability and agreement of muscle strength, power and functional performance measures in patients with hip osteoarthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259325
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2014 Nov 4;46(10):997-1005
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-2014
Author
Theresa Bieler
S Peter Magnusson
Michael Kjaer
Nina Beyer
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2014 Nov 4;46(10):997-1005
Date
Nov-4-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Disability Evaluation
Exercise Therapy
Female
Humans
Lower Extremity - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle Strength - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiopathology
Observer Variation
Osteoarthritis, Hip - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Reproducibility of Results
Walking - physiology
Abstract
To investigate the reliability and agreement of measures of lower extremity muscle strength, power and functional performance in patients with hip osteoarthritis at different time intervals, and to compare these with the same measures in healthy peers.
Intra-rater test-retest separated by 1, 2, or 2.5 weeks in patients, and 1 week in healthy peers.
Patients with hip osteoarthritis (age range 61-83 years) with 1 (n?=?37), 2 (n?=?35), or 2.5 weeks (n?=?15) between tests, and 35 healthy peers (age range 63-82 years).
Maximal isometric hip and thigh strength, leg extensor power, and functional performance (8-foot Up & Go, stair climbing, chair stand and 6-min walk) were measured in patients, and quadriceps strength, leg extensor power and functional performance were measured in healthy peers. Systematic error, reliability and agreement were calculated.
Most hip strength measurements for the most symptomatic extremity, and nearly all strength measurements for the least symptomatic lower extremity, declined after 1 week (p?
PubMed ID
25103138 View in PubMed
Less detail

Practice guidelines for early ambulation of burn survivors after lower extremity grafts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130855
Source
J Burn Care Res. 2012 May-Jun;33(3):319-29
Publication Type
Article
Author
Bernadette Nedelec
Michael A Serghiou
Jonathan Niszczak
Margaret McMahon
Tanja Healey
Author Affiliation
School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Burn Care Res. 2012 May-Jun;33(3):319-29
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Burns - diagnosis - rehabilitation - surgery
Early Ambulation - standards
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Graft Rejection
Graft Survival
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Lower Extremity - physiopathology - surgery
Male
Postoperative Care - methods
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Quebec
Risk assessment
Skin Transplantation - methods
Survivors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The objective of this review was to systematically evaluate the available clinical evidence for early ambulation of burn survivors after lower extremity skin grafting procedures so that practice guidelines could be proposed. It provides evidence-based recommendations, specifically for the rehabilitation interventions required for early ambulation of burn survivors. These guidelines are designed to assist all healthcare providers who are responsible for initiating and supporting the ambulation and rehabilitation of burn survivors after lower extremity grafting. Summary recommendations were made after the literature, retrieved by systematic review, was critically appraised and the level of evidence determined according to Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine criteria. A formal consensus exercise was performed to address some of the identified gaps in the literature which were believed to be critical building blocks of clinical practice.
PubMed ID
21959211 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence of joint-related pain in the extremities and spine in five groups of top athletes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134612
Source
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2011 Sep;19(9):1540-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Pall Jonasson
Klas Halldin
Jon Karlsson
Olof Thoreson
Jonas Hvannberg
Leif Swärd
Adad Baranto
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg and Sahlgrenska University Hospital, 413 45 Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2011 Sep;19(9):1540-6
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Arthralgia - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Athletic Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology
Athletic Performance
Case-Control Studies
Child
Chronic Disease
Confidence Intervals
Hockey - injuries
Humans
Logistic Models
Lower Extremity - physiopathology
Male
Odds Ratio
Pain Measurement
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Reference Values
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Spinal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Sports - physiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Upper Extremity - physiopathology
Weight Lifting - injuries
Young Adult
Abstract
Joint-related pain conditions from the spine and extremities are common among top athletes. The frequency of back pain has, however, been studied in more detail, and the frequency of low-back pain in top athletes in different high-load sports has been reported to be as high as 85%. Sport-related pain from different joints in the extremities is, however, infrequently reported on in the literature.
Seventy-five male athletes, i.e. divers, weight-lifters, wrestlers, orienteers and ice-hockey players and 12 non-athletes (control group) were included in the study. A specific self-assessed pain-oriented questionnaire related to the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine, as well as the various joints, i.e. shoulders, elbows, wrists, hips, knees and ankles, was filled out by the athletes and the non-athletes.
The overall frequency of pain reported by the athletes during the last week/last year was as follows; cervical spine 35/55%; thoracic spine 22/33%; lumbar spine 50/68%; shoulder 10/21%; elbow 7/7%; wrist 7/8%; hip 15/23%; knee 22/44%; and ankle 11/25%. The corresponding values for non-athletes were cervical spine 9/36%; thoracic spine 17/33%; lumbar spine 36/50%; shoulder 0/9%; elbow 9/0%; wrist 0/0%; hip 9/16%; knee 10/9%; and ankle 0/0%. A higher percentage of athletes reported pain in almost all joint regions, but there were no statistically significant differences (n.s.), with the exception of the knees (P = 0.05). Over the last year, athletes reporting the highest pain frequency in the lumbar spine were ice-hockey players and, in the cervical spine, wrestlers and ice-hockey players. The highest levels of knee pain were found among wrestlers and ice-hockey players, whereas the highest levels for wrist pain were found among divers, hip pain among weight-lifters, orienteers and divers and ankle pain among orienteers. For the thoracic spine, shoulder and elbow regions, only minor differences were found.
There was no statistically significant difference in prevalence of pain in the neck, spine and joints between top athletes in different sports or between athletes and non-athletes. However, pain in one spinal region was correlated to reported pain in other regions of the spine. Moreover, pain in the spine was also correlated to pain in the shoulders, hips and knees.
PubMed ID
21559845 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevention of severe contractures might replace multilevel surgery in cerebral palsy: results of a population-based health care programme and new techniques to reduce spasticity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29686
Source
J Pediatr Orthop B. 2005 Jul;14(4):269-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Gunnar Hägglund
Sofia Andersson
Henrik Düppe
Henrik Lauge-Pedersen
Henrik Lauge Pedertsen
Eva Nordmark
Lena Westbom
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. Gunnar.Hagglund@ort.lu.se
Source
J Pediatr Orthop B. 2005 Jul;14(4):269-73
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Dyskinesia Agents - therapeutic use
Baclofen - therapeutic use
Botulinum Toxins - therapeutic use
Cerebral Palsy - therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Contracture - physiopathology - prevention & control
Follow-Up Studies
Hip Dislocation - prevention & control
Humans
Infusion Pumps
Injections, Spinal
Lower Extremity - physiopathology
Muscle Relaxants, Central - therapeutic use
Muscle Spasticity - therapy
Muscle, Skeletal - physiopathology
Program Evaluation
Prospective Studies
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Registries
Rhizotomy
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
During the 1990s three new techniques to reduce spasticity and dystonia in children with cerebral palsy (CP) were introduced in southern Sweden: selective dorsal rhizotomy, continuous intrathecal baclofen infusion and botulinum toxin treatment. In 1994 a CP register and a health care programme, aimed to prevent hip dislocation and severe contractures, were initiated in the area. The total population of children with CP born 1990-1991, 1992-1993 and 1994-1995 was evaluated and compared at 8 years of age. In non-ambulant children the passive range of motion in hip, knee and ankle improved significantly from the first to the later age groups. Ambulant children had similar range of motion in the three age groups, with almost no severe contractures. The proportion of children treated with orthopaedic surgery for contracture or skeletal torsion deformity decreased from 40 to 15% (P = 0.0019). One-fifth of the children with spastic diplegia had been treated with selective dorsal rhizotomy. One-third of the children born 1994-1995 had been treated with botulinum toxin before 8 years of age. With early treatment of spasticity, early non-operative treatment of contracture and prevention of hip dislocation, the need for orthopaedic surgery for contracture or torsion deformity is reduced, and the need for multilevel procedures seems to be eliminated.
Notes
Erratum In: J Pediatr Orthop B. 2005 Sep;14(5):388Pedertsen, Henrik Lauge [corrected to Lauge-Pedersen, Henrik]
PubMed ID
15931031 View in PubMed
Less detail

Reliability and validity of the Finnish version of the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290130
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2017 06; 39(12):1228-1234
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
06-2017
Author
Jussi P Repo
Erkki J Tukiainen
Risto P Roine
Outi Ilves
Salme Järvenpää
Arja Häkkinen
Author Affiliation
a Department of Plastic Surgery , University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital , Helsinki , Finland.
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2017 06; 39(12):1228-1234
Date
06-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Ankle Joint - physiopathology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Female
Finland
Humans
Language
Lower Extremity - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Psychometrics - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The present study aimed to assess the psychometric properties of the Finnish version of the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) among foot and ankle patients.
The LEFS was translated and cross-culturally adapted to Finnish. We assessed the test-retest reliability, internal consistency, floor-ceiling effect, construct validity and criterion validity in patients who underwent surgery due to musculoskeletal pathology of the foot and ankle (N?=?166).
The test-retest reliability was high (ICC = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.91-0.95). The standard error of measurement was 4.1 points. The Finnish LEFS showed high internal consistency (Cronbach's a?=?0.96). A slight ceiling effect occurred as 17% achieved the maximum score. The LEFS correlation was strong with the 15D Mobility dimension (r?=?0.74) and overall HRQoL (r?=?0.66), pain during foot and ankle activity (r=?-0.69) and stiffness (r=?-0.62). LEFS correlated moderately with foot and ankle pain at rest (r=?-0.50) and with physical activity (r?=?0.46).
The Finnish version of the LEFS showed reliability and validity comparable to those of the original version. This study indicates that the Finnish version of the LEFS serves both clinical and scientific purposes in assessing lower-limb function. Implications for Rehabilitation The Finnish version of the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) is a reliable and valid tool for assessing lower-extremity musculoskeletal disability in Finnish-speaking population. Investigation of the psychometric properties of the Finnish version of the LEFS showed validity and reliability comparable to those of the original English version. The Finnish LEFS is easy to complete and suitable for clinical, rehabilitation and research purposes.
PubMed ID
27384713 View in PubMed
Less detail

14 records – page 1 of 2.