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The 2001 Helene Hudson Memorial Lecture. The power of story: using intimacy and love in oncology nursing practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188986
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2002;12(2):80-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Vivian Painter
Author Affiliation
Patient Services, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg Regional Health Authority, Oncology Program, Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2002;12(2):80-99
Date
2002
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Love
Oncology Nursing
PubMed ID
12181944 View in PubMed
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Associations between the parent-child relationship and adolescent self-worth: a genetically informed study of twin parents and their adolescent children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286179
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2017 Jan;58(1):46-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Tom A McAdams
Fruhling V Rijsdijk
Jurgita Narusyte
Jody M Ganiban
David Reiss
Erica Spotts
Jenae M Neiderhiser
Paul Lichtenstein
Thalia C Eley
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2017 Jan;58(1):46-54
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Love
Male
Middle Aged
Parent-Child Relations
Self Concept
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Low self-worth during adolescence predicts a range of emotional and behavioural problems. As such, identifying potential sources of influence on self-worth is important. Aspects of the parent-child relationship are often associated with adolescent self-worth but to date it is unclear whether such associations may be attributable to familial confounding (e.g. genetic relatedness). We set out to clarify the nature of relationships between parental expressed affection and adolescent self-worth, and parent-child closeness and adolescent self-worth.
We used data from the Twin and Offspring Study in Sweden, a children-of-twins sample comprising 909 adult twin pairs with adolescent children. Using these data we were able to apply structural equation models with which we could examine whether associations remained after accounting for genetic transmission.
Results demonstrated that parent-child closeness and parental-expressed affection were both phenotypically associated with adolescent self-worth. Associations could not be attributed to genetic relatedness between parent and child.
Parent-child closeness and parental affection are associated with adolescent self-worth above and beyond effects attributable to genetic relatedness. Data were cross-sectional, so the direction of effects cannot be confirmed but findings support the notion that positive parent-child relationships increase adolescent self-worth.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27426633 View in PubMed
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Being a family in the midst of living and dying.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82244
Source
J Palliat Care. 2006;22(1):26-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Syrén Susanne M
Saveman Britt-Inger
Benzein Eva G
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Behavioural Sciences, Kalmar University, Kalmar, Sweden.
Source
J Palliat Care. 2006;22(1):26-32
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - psychology
Attitude to Death
Child
Communication
Depression - psychology
Existentialism - psychology
Family - psychology
Female
Grief
Humans
Life Change Events
Loneliness
Love
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Palliative Care - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Social Support
Spirituality
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to illuminate the way of being a family when one family member is in the midst of living and dying. A family systems frame and a life world perspective were used in interviews with five families. A qualitative analysis inspired by Giorgi revealed dialectic and dynamic processes in constant motion within and between the continua being in affinity-being in loneliness, being in power-being in helplessness, and being in continuity-being in disruption. When families were moving in the direction of being in affinity, power, and continuity, these seemed to be prerequisites for enduring their challenged life situation and for giving them a kind of repose. When the movements were in the opposite direction, existential and emotional suffering were manifested as individual embodied experiences such as depression and anxiety.
PubMed ID
16689412 View in PubMed
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Being the next of kin of an adult person with muscular dystrophy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82346
Source
Clin Nurs Res. 2006 May;15(2):86-104; discussion 105-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Boström Katrin
Ahlström Gerd
Sunvisson Helena
Author Affiliation
Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Orebro University, Center for Rehabilitation Research, Orebro County Council.
Source
Clin Nurs Res. 2006 May;15(2):86-104; discussion 105-6
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Altruism
Attitude to Health
Caregivers - psychology
Cost of Illness
Disease Progression
Family - psychology
Female
Goals
Humans
Life Style
Love
Male
Middle Aged
Muscular Dystrophies - nursing - psychology
Narration
Nursing Methodology Research
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
A chronic disorder affects all members of the family in various ways. The aim of this study is to elucidate the next of kin's (N= 36) experiences when an adult family member has muscular dystrophy. The relationships were partner (36%, n= 14), parent (18%, n= 7), child (21%, n= 8), sibling (15%, n= 6), and other relative (3%, n= 1). Latent content analysis is employed and involves an interpretation of the interviewtext. The results showthe meaning of being close to a person with muscular dystrophy through the themes that emerged: exposure of the family; the span between obligation and love; being vigilant, protective, and supportive; and striving for an ordinary life. This study reveals a need for healthcare staff to understand the next of kin's narrated meaning of changes when a family member has a progressive disease.
PubMed ID
16638828 View in PubMed
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Beyond survival: reclaiming self after leaving an abusive male partner.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190743
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2001 Mar;32(4):79-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
J. Wuest
M. Merritt-Gray
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, Canada. wuest@unb.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2001 Mar;32(4):79-94
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Canada
Divorce - psychology
Empathy
Female
Feminism
Freedom
Gender Identity
Guilt
Humans
Love
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Spouse Abuse - psychology
Spouses - psychology
Survivors - psychology
Abstract
Research on the process of leaving an abusive male partner has focused on surviving abuse and the crisis of leaving. Little is known about the experience of women who have left abusive male partners and not gone back. In this feminist grounded theory study of women leaving abusive partners, the researchers discovered the basic social-psychological process of reclaiming self in which women voyaged through 4 stages: counteracting abuse, breaking free, not going back, and moving on. The focus of this paper is the last stage, moving on, during which women move beyond framing their lives as survivors of an abusive relationship through the processes of figuring it out, putting it in its rightful place, launching new relationships, and taking on a new image. The findings extend our knowledge of the leaving process by delineating the ways in which the abuse experience and the survival process are displaced as the centre of the woman's intra-psychic, interpersonal, and social existence. Questions are raised about how nurses and other health professionals can avoid revictimizing women who have moved on.
Notes
Comment In: Evid Based Nurs. 2002 Apr;5(2):6011995663
PubMed ID
11928303 View in PubMed
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The California Psychological Inventory as a measurement of permissiveness-restrictiveness and love-hostility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109378
Source
Psychol Rep. 1970 Oct;27(2):381-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1970
Author
L A Beech
Source
Psychol Rep. 1970 Oct;27(2):381-2
Date
Oct-1970
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Authoritarianism
Canada
Counseling
Hostility
Humans
Love
Male
Psychological Tests
Social Facilitation
PubMed ID
5485514 View in PubMed
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The core of love when caring for patients suffering from addiction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290162
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Jun; 29(2):353-60
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Kari M Thorkildsen
Katie Eriksson
Maj-Britt Råholm
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health, Stord/Haugesund University College, Stord, Norway.
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Jun; 29(2):353-60
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Empathy
Female
Hermeneutics
Humans
Love
Middle Aged
Norway
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nurses - psychology
Nursing Care - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - nursing
Abstract
Drug addiction is a serious health problem. The aim of this study was to gain an understanding of the core of love when caring for patients suffering from addiction. The study had a hermeneutical approach. Four nurses working at a detoxification unit were interviewed. Data were interpreted using a hermeneutical text interpretation based on Gadamer's hermeneutics. The results revealed the core of love in four dimensions: love as an inner driving force, searching for the human being behind the addiction, faith in the inner power of human beings and love as a movement of giving and receiving. The hermeneutical interpretation revealed the core of love as sacrifice, showing that sacrifice is an ethical dimension and that sacrifice involves searching for the patient's ontological suffering. Sacrifice is connected to faith, and faith in love is decisive for a life without drugs. Sacrifice involves being mutual gifts to one another, a self-reinforcing motion of sacrifice that energizes the nurses to go on with their work.
PubMed ID
25250789 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Homosex. 2008;54(1-2):103-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Heidi Eng
Author Affiliation
Diakonhjemmet University College, Oslo, Norway. eng@diakonhjemmet.no
Source
J Homosex. 2008;54(1-2):103-23
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Gender Identity
Homosexuality, Female
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Love
Male
Norway
Prejudice
Sexual Behavior
Social Conditions
Sports
Abstract
Based on interviews with Norwegian athletes living as lesbians, gays and bisexuals, this article investigates the possible subversive effect of queer visibility in sport. While female athletes living as lesbians sometimes create queer alternative spaces within mainstream sport contexts, male athletes acting openly as homosexuals challenge heteronormative discourses by attempting to disrupt hegemonic beliefs about homosexual behavior. The sexual practices of both groups confirm as well as challenge the laws of heteronormativity.
PubMed ID
18771115 View in PubMed
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The experience of family members caring for a dying loved one.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180247
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2004 Mar;10(3):133-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Annie Perreault
Frances Fothergill-Bourbonnais
Valerie Fiset
Author Affiliation
SCO Health Service, University of Ottawa Institute of Palliative Care, and C.A.R.M.E.N. Centre, 160 boul. de l'hôpital, suite 103, Gatineau, Québec, Canada.
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2004 Mar;10(3):133-43
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Death
Attitude to Health
Caregivers - education - psychology
Cost of Illness
Family - psychology
Female
Home Nursing - psychology
Humans
Love
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Needs Assessment
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Terminal Care - psychology
Abstract
Qualitative nursing research into the experience of family members caring for a dying loved one has been limited. This study used a phenomenological approach to explore this experience. The pattern of caring for a dying loved one and its intertwined dimensions were described. Caregivers felt a sense of helplessness that was associated with illness progression, their inability to relieve pain and discomfort, and decision-making related to patient admission to a palliative care unit. Lack of support from health professionals and having to face personal limits were found to accelerate the decision to admit a patient. The role of a support person involved with the caregiver was also considered and found to be an area worthy of further investigation. Health professionals must provide information and support tailored to the caregivers' needs as they change along a patient's illness trajectory.
PubMed ID
15126958 View in PubMed
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34 records – page 1 of 4.