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[10th anniversary of the Year of Old Person: towards the society for all ages].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153414
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2009;22(4):535-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
O N Mikhailova
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2009;22(4):535-8
Date
2009
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Congresses as topic
Humans
International Cooperation
Longevity
Population Dynamics
Public Policy
Russia
Social Planning
Socioeconomic Factors
United Nations
Abstract
The paper highlights the milestones in the development of the UN idea of the Society for All Ages, originally announced as a motto of the International Year of Old Persons and later accepted as a central concept of the Madrid International Plan of Action on Aging (MIPA). In accord with MIPA building of the Society for All Ages will be a major issue in policies and programmes on aging in the XXI century. According to the UN experts opinion demographic tendencies may produce considerable impact on economy, social sphere and safety of Russia. The issues of aging are far from being completely and rapidly included into national development strategies on priority basis.
PubMed ID
20405719 View in PubMed
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Accelerated immunosenescence in preindustrial twin mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178937
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004 Aug 17;101(33):12391-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-17-2004
Author
Samuli Helle
Virpi Lummaa
Jukka Jokela
Author Affiliation
Section of Ecology, Department of Biology, University of Turku, FIN-20014, Turku, Finland. samuli.helle@utu.fi
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004 Aug 17;101(33):12391-6
Date
Aug-17-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging - immunology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
Humans
Industry - history
Infection - immunology - mortality
Longevity - immunology
Models, Immunological
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Multiple - immunology
Reproduction - immunology
Time Factors
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - immunology - mortality
Abstract
Life-history theory predicts a tradeoff between reproductive effort and lifespan. It has been suggested that this tradeoff is a result of reproductive costs accelerating senescence of the immune system, leading to earlier death. Longevity costs of reproduction are suggested for some human populations, but whether high reproductive effort leads to impaired immune function is unknown. We examined how reproductive effort affected postreproductive survival and the probability of dying of an infectious disease in women born in preindustrial Finland between 1702 and 1859. We found that mothers delivering twins had reduced postreproductive survival after age 65. This effect arose because mothers of twins had a higher probability of succumbing to an infectious disease (mainly tuberculosis) than mothers delivering singletons. The risk among mothers of twins of dying of an infectious disease was further elevated if mothers had started reproducing early. In contrast, neither female postreproductive survival nor the risk of succumbing to an infectious disease was influenced by the total number of offspring produced. Our results provide evidence of a long-term survival cost of twinning in humans and indicate that the mechanism mediating this cost might have been accelerated immunosenescence.
Notes
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Cites: Infect Immun. 2001 Jul;69(7):4195-20111401954
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Cites: Twin Res. 2003 Feb;6(1):55-6112626229
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Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2000 Aug;79(8):679-8610949234
PubMed ID
15295101 View in PubMed
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Access to health care, socioeconomic status, and health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202949
Source
Ann Intern Med. 1999 Mar 2;130(5):452-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2-1999
Author
M A Baltzan
Source
Ann Intern Med. 1999 Mar 2;130(5):452-3
Date
Mar-2-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Services Accessibility
Health status
Humans
Longevity
Socioeconomic Factors
Notes
Comment On: Ann Intern Med. 1998 Oct 1;129(7):567-729758578
Comment On: Ann Intern Med. 1998 Sep 1;129(5):406-119735069
PubMed ID
10068429 View in PubMed
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Addressing the epidemiologic transition in the former Soviet Union: strategies for health system and public health reform in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212589
Source
Am J Public Health. 1996 Mar;86(3):313-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
T H Tulchinsky
E A Varavikova
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health Hadassah-Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel.
Source
Am J Public Health. 1996 Mar;86(3):313-20
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Care Reform
Health Priorities
Health services needs and demand
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Longevity
Morbidity - trends
Mortality - trends
Public Health Administration
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper reviews Russia's health crisis, financing, and organization and public health reform needs.
The structure, policy, supply of services, and health status indicators of Russia's health system are examined.
Longevity is declining; mortality rates from cardiovascular diseases and trauma are high and rising; maternal and infant mortality are high. Vaccine-preventable diseases have reappeared in epidemic form. Nutrition status is problematic.
The crisis relates to Russia's economic transition, but it also goes deep into the former Soviet health system. The epidemiologic transition from a predominance of infectious to noninfectious diseases was addressed by increasing the quantity of services. The health system lacked mechanisms for epidemiologic or economic analysis and accountability to the public. Policy and funding favored hospitals over ambulatory care and individual routine checkups over community-oriented preventive approaches. Reform since 1991 has centered on national health insurance and decentralized management of services. A national health strategy to address fundamental public health problems is recommended.
Notes
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Cites: Stud Fam Plann. 1991 Nov-Dec;22(6):368-771792676
Cites: Health Policy. 1991 Sep;19(1):45-5410117391
Cites: World Health Stat Q. 1992;45(1):15-281413854
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Cites: J Health Adm Educ. 1994 Fall;12(4):485-51710137980
Cites: JAMA. 1995 May 24-31;273(20):1569-737745761
Comment In: Am J Public Health. 1996 Mar;86(3):321-38604755
PubMed ID
8604754 View in PubMed
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Adolescent experience predicts longevity: evidence from historical epidemiology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260065
Source
J Dev Orig Health Dis. 2014 Jun;5(3):171-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
A. Falconi
A. Gemmill
R E Dahl
R. Catalano
Source
J Dev Orig Health Dis. 2014 Jun;5(3):171-7
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Development - physiology
Cohort Studies
England - epidemiology
Female
Forecasting
France - epidemiology
Humans
Life Expectancy - trends
Longevity - physiology
Male
Sweden - epidemiology
Wales - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Human development reportedly includes critical and sensitive periods during which environmental stressors can affect traits that persist throughout life. Controversy remains over which of these periods provides an opportunity for such stressors to affect health and longevity. The elaboration of reproductive biology and its behavioral sequelae during adolescence suggests such a sensitive period, particularly among males. We test the hypothesis that life expectancy at age 20 among males exposed to life-threatening stressors during early adolescence will fall below that among other males. We apply time-series methods to cohort mortality data in France between 1816 and 1919, England and Wales between 1841 and 1919, and Sweden between 1861 and 1919. Our results indicate an inverse association between cohort death rates at ages 10-14 and cohort life expectancy at age 20. Our findings imply that better-informed and more strategic management of the stressors encountered by early adolescents may improve population health.
PubMed ID
24901655 View in PubMed
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Adverse events are common on the intensive care unit: results from a structured record review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124542
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2012 Sep;56(8):959-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
L. Nilsson
A. Pihl
M. Tågsjö
E. Ericsson
Author Affiliation
Division of Drug Research, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden. lena.nilsson@lio.se
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2012 Sep;56(8):959-65
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
APACHE
Adolescent
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Harm Reduction
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Longevity
Male
Medical Errors
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Intensive care is advanced and highly technical, and it is essential that, despite this, patient care remains safe and of high quality. Adverse events (AEs) are supposed to be reported to internal quality control systems by health-care providers, but many are never reported. Patients on the intensive care unit (ICU) are at special risk for AEs. Our aim was to identify the incidence and characteristics of AEs in patients who died on the ICU during a 2-year period.
A structured record review according to the Global Trigger Tool (GTT) was used to review charts from patients cared for at the ICU of a middle-sized Swedish hospital during 2007 and 2008 and who died during or immediately after ICU care. All identified AEs were scored according to severity and preventability.
We reviewed 128 records, and 41 different AEs were identified in 25 patients (19.5%). Health care-associated infections, hypoglycaemia, pressure sores and procedural complications were the most common harmful events. Twenty two (54%) of the AEs were classified as being avoidable. Two of the 41 AEs were reported as complications according to the Swedish Intensive Care Registry, and one AE had been reported in the internal AE-reporting system.
Almost one fifth of the patients who died on the ICU were subjected to harmful events. GTT has the advantage of identifying more patient injuries caused by AEs than the traditional AE-reporting systems used on many ICUs.
PubMed ID
22571769 View in PubMed
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Age-associated accumulation of the apolipoprotein C-III gene T-455C polymorphism C allele in a Russian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195836
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2001 Jan;56(1):B27-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
S V Anisimov
M V Volkova
L V Lenskaya
V K Khavinson
D V Solovieva
E I Schwartz
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, I.P. Pavlov St. Petersburg State Medical University, Russia. anisimovs@grc.nia.nih.gov
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2001 Jan;56(1):B27-32
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alleles
Apolipoprotein C-III
Apolipoproteins C - genetics
Child
DNA
Genetics, Population
Humans
Longevity - genetics
Molecular Sequence Data
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Risk factors
Russia
Triglycerides - blood - genetics
Abstract
Apolipoprotein C-III (apoC-III) is the major component of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. One of six identified polymorphisms in the apoC-III 5'-untranslated region (T-455C) is located within a functional insulin-response element. In a group of 137 elderly individuals (70-106 years old), the allele distribution was analyzed using restriction fragment length polymorphisms. Statistical analysis of allele frequencies was performed on subgroups selected by age and in elderly patients with arterial hypertension or ischemic heart disease. A greater frequency of the apoC-III -455C allele was demonstrated with aging (p
PubMed ID
11193221 View in PubMed
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Age-associated tyrosine nitration of rat skeletal muscle glycogen phosphorylase b: characterization by HPLC-nanoelectrospray-tandem mass spectrometry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82459
Source
Exp Gerontol. 2006 Apr;41(4):407-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Sharov Victor S
Galeva Nadezhda A
Kanski Jaroslaw
Williams Todd D
Schöneich Christian
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Kansas, 2095 Constant Avenue, Lawrence, KS 66047, USA.
Source
Exp Gerontol. 2006 Apr;41(4):407-16
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - metabolism
Animals
Base Sequence
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Glycogen Phosphorylase, Muscle Form - analysis - genetics - metabolism
Longevity
Molecular Sequence Data
Muscle, Skeletal - metabolism
Peroxynitrous Acid
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Sequence Alignment
Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Tyrosine - analogs & derivatives - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
We identified age-dependent post-translational modifications of skeletal muscle glycogen phosphorylase b (Ph-b), isolated from F1 hybrids of Fisher 344 x Brown Norway rats. Ph-b isolated from 34 months old rats showed a statistically significant decrease in specific activity compared to 6 months old animals: 13.8+/-0.7 vs. 20.6+/-0.8 U mg(-1) protein, respectively. Western blot analysis of the purified Ph-b with anti-3-NT antibodies revealed an age-dependent accumulation of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), quantified by reverse-phase HPLC-UV analysis to increase from 0.05+/-0.03 to 0.34+/-0.11 (mol 3-NT/mol Ph-b) for 6 vs. 34 months old rats, respectively. HPLC-nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry revealed the accumulation of 3-NT on Tyr113, Tyr161 and Tyr573. While nitration of Tyr113 was detected for both young and old rats, 3-NT at positions 161 and 573 was identified only for Ph-b isolated from 34 months old rats. The sequence of the rat muscle Ph-b was corrected based on our protein sequence mapping and a custom rat PHS2 sequence containing 17 differently located amino acid residues was used instead of the database sequence. The in vitro reaction of peroxynitrite with Ph-b resulted in the nitration of multiple Tyr residues at positions 51, 52, 113, 155, 185, 203, 262, 280, 404, 473, 731, and 732. Thus, the in vitro nitration conditions only mimic the nitration of a single Tyr residue observed in vivo suggesting alternative pathways controlling the accumulation of 3-NT in vivo. Our data show a correlation of age-dependent 3-NT accumulation with Ph-b inactivation.
PubMed ID
16616821 View in PubMed
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Age at death and bone biology of the Barrow mummies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2462
Source
Arctic Anthropology. 21(1):83-88.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
Thompson, D.D.
Cowen, K.S.
Author Affiliation
University of Connecticut
Source
Arctic Anthropology. 21(1):83-88.
Date
1984
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Barrow
Age at death
Osteoporosis
Bone core analysis
Bone crystallographic analysis
Trabecular bone volume
Longevity
Mummies
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 208.
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Age disparities in stroke quality of care and delivery of health services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149008
Source
Stroke. 2009 Oct;40(10):3328-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Gustavo Saposnik
Sandra E Black
Antoine Hakim
Jiming Fang
Jack V Tu
Moira K Kapral
Author Affiliation
Stroke Research Unit, Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. saposnikg@smh.toronto.on.ca
Source
Stroke. 2009 Oct;40(10):3328-35
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Atrial Fibrillation - drug therapy - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Cost of Illness
Deglutition Disorders - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Emergency Medical Services - standards - statistics & numerical data - trends
Female
Health Policy
Health Services - economics
Hospital Units - standards - statistics & numerical data - trends
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Longevity
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - economics
Patient Discharge - economics
Pneumonia - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Quality of Health Care - statistics & numerical data - trends
Quality of Life
Severity of Illness Index
Stroke - complications - mortality - therapy
Thrombolytic Therapy - statistics & numerical data - trends
Warfarin - therapeutic use
Abstract
Limited information is available on the effect of age on stroke management and care delivery. Our aim was to determine whether access to stroke care, delivery of health services, and clinical outcomes after stroke are affected by age.
This was a prospective cohort study of patients with acute ischemic stroke in the province of Ontario, Canada, admitted to stroke centers participating in the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network between July 1, 2003 and March 31, 2005. Primary outcomes were the following selected indicators of quality stroke care: (1) use of thrombolysis; (2) dysphagia screening; (3) admission to a stroke unit; (4) carotid imaging; (5) antithrombotic therapy; and (6) warfarin for atrial fibrillation at discharge. Secondary outcomes were risk-adjusted stroke fatality, discharge disposition, pneumonia, and length of hospital stay.
Among 3631 patients with ischemic stroke, 1219 (33.6%) were older than 80 years. There were no significant differences in stroke care delivery by age group. Stroke fatality increased with age, with a 30-day risk adjusted fatality of 7.1%, 6.5%, 8.8%, and 14.8% for those aged 59 or younger, 60 to 69, 70 to 79, and 80 years or older, respectively. Those aged older than 80 years had a longer length of hospitalization, increased risk of pneumonia, and higher disability at discharge compared to those younger than 80. This group was also less likely to be discharged home.
In the context of a province-wide coordinated stroke care system, stroke care delivery was similar across all age groups with the exception of slightly lower rates of investigations in the very elderly. Increasing age was associated with stroke severity and stroke case-fatality.
PubMed ID
19696418 View in PubMed
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469 records – page 1 of 47.