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1210 records – page 1 of 121.

3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors and the risk of cancer: a nested case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197667
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2000 Aug 14-28;160(15):2363-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
L. Blais
A. Desgagné
J. LeLorier
Author Affiliation
Centre de Recherche, Hôtel-Dieu du CHUM, Saint-Urbain, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2000 Aug 14-28;160(15):2363-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Aged
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Hypolipidemic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Long-Term Care
Male
Neoplasms - chemically induced
Quebec
Risk
Abstract
During the past 15 years there has been an exponential increase in the number of prescriptions for lipid-lowering drugs. Uncertainties remain about the long-term impact of these medications on cancer, which is particularly bothersome given that the duration of these treatments may extend for several decades.
To explore the association between 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors and cancer incidence.
Using the administrative health databases of the Régie de l'Assurance-Maladie du Québec we performed a nested case-control study. We selected a cohort of 6721 beneficiaries of the health care plan of Quebec who were free of cancer for at least 1 year at cohort entry, 65 years and older, and treated with lipid-modifying agents. Cohort members were selected between 1988 and 1994 and were followed up for a median period of 2.7 years. From the cohort, 542 cases of first malignant neoplasm were identified, and 5420 controls were randomly selected. Users of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors were compared with users of bile acid-binding resins as to their risk of cancer. Specific cancer sites were also considered.
Users of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors were found to be 28% less likely than users of bile acid-binding resins to be diagnosed as having any cancer (rate ratio, 0.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.57-0.92). All specific cancer sites under study were found to be not or inversely associated with the use of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors.
The results of our study provide some degree of reassurance about the safety of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors.
Notes
Comment In: Arch Intern Med. 2001 Jun 11;161(11):146011386902
PubMed ID
10927735 View in PubMed
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15. Canadian experience with patient care classification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251109
Source
Med Care. 1976 May;14(5 Suppl):134-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1976
Author
J A MacDonell
Source
Med Care. 1976 May;14(5 Suppl):134-7
Date
May-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Canada
Classification
Costs and Cost Analysis
Financing, Government
Humans
Insurance, Health
Long-Term Care
Nursing Care
Patient Care Planning
Social Adjustment
Abstract
Patient care classification in Canada in the past has been largely dictated by insurance coverage and the fiscal policies of the individual provinces. In recent years, however, the Canadian Department of Health and Welfare has been promoting the development of a standard patient care classification based on assessment of client or patient needs in regard to the category, type, and level of care. Experimentation with the proposed classification system in several provinces confirms the need in long-term care to include assessment of nursing requirements, physical functioning, and psychosocial assets and liabilities, and points to the importance of using such a classification for planning and evaluating patient care as well as for administrative purposes.
PubMed ID
819730 View in PubMed
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[24-hour duty a way to solve the nursing shortage. An open job with a lot of responsibility. Interview by Monika Trozell].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232648
Source
Vardfacket. 1988 Aug 11;12(13-14):8-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-11-1988
Source
AARN News Lett. 1990 May;46(5):19
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1990
Author
V. Ferguson
Source
AARN News Lett. 1990 May;46(5):19
Date
May-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alberta
Geriatric Assessment
Geriatric Nursing
Home Care Services
Humans
Long-Term Care
PubMed ID
2113345 View in PubMed
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Abdominal malignancies in patients with Wilson's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18250
Source
QJM. 2003 Sep;96(9):657-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
J M Walshe
E. Waldenström
V. Sams
H. Nordlinder
K. Westermark
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, The Middlesex Hospital, London, UK. penicillamine@waitrose.com
Source
QJM. 2003 Sep;96(9):657-62
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Adenocarcinoma - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Biliary Tract Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Child
Cholangiocarcinoma - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Hepatolenticular Degeneration - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Incidence
Liver Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Long-Term Care
Male
Mutation
Pancreatic Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Wilson's disease is associated with heavy copper overload, primarily in the liver. Copper is a toxic metal, and might be expected to be associated with cancer induction, as iron is in haemochromatosis. However, liver cancer is currently believed to be extremely rare in this disease, and other intra-abdominal malignancies have not been reported. AIM: To assess the frequency of abdominal malignant disease in patients with Wilson's disease on long-term follow-up. DESIGN: Retrospective study in two specialist Wilson's disease clinics: Cambridge/London and Uppsala. METHODS: We reviewed the case records of 363 patients seen at three centres: Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, 1955-1987; the Middlesex Hospital, London, 1987-2000; and the University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden, 1966-2002. Patients were grouped by length of follow-up: 10-19 years; 20-29 years; 30-39 years; and 40 years or more. RESULTS: No cancers were seen in patients followed for
PubMed ID
12925721 View in PubMed
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Access, relevance, and control in the research process: lessons from Indian country.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3424
Source
J Aging Health. 2004 Nov;16(5 Suppl):58S-77S
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Spero M Manson
Eva Garroutte
R Turner Goins
Patricia Nez Henderson
Author Affiliation
American Indian and Alaska Native Programs, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Nighthorse Campbell Native Health Building, Mail Stop F800, P.O. Box 6508, Aurora, CO 80045-0508, USA. spero.manson@uchsc.edu
Source
J Aging Health. 2004 Nov;16(5 Suppl):58S-77S
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Communication
Culture
Ethics, Research
Humans
Indians, North American
Long-Term Care - utilization
Physician-Patient Relations
Research Design
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Smoking
United States
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To illustrate successful strategies in working with American Indian (AI) and Alaska Native (AN) communities in aging and health research by emphasizing access, local relevance, and decision-making processes. METHODS: Case examples of health studies involving older AIs (greater than or equal to 50 years) among Eastern Band Cherokee Indians, a federally recognized reservation; the Cherokee Nation, a rural, nonreservation, tribal jurisdictional service area; and Lakota tribal members living in Rapid City, South Dakota. RESULTS: Local review and decision making reflect the unique legal and historical factors underpinning AI sovereignty. Although specific approval procedures vary, there are common expectations across these communities that can be anticipated in conceptualizing, designing, and implementing health research among native elders. CONCLUSIONS: Most investigators are unprepared to address the demands of health research in AI communities. Community-based participatory research in this setting conflicts with investigators' desire for academic freedom and scientific independence. Successful collaboration promises to enhance research efficiencies and move findings more quickly to clinical practice.
PubMed ID
15448287 View in PubMed
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The accumulated challenges of long-term care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146298
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 2010 Jan-Feb;29(1):29-34
Publication Type
Article
Author
David Barton Smith
Zhanlian Feng
Author Affiliation
Center for Health Equality, School of Public Health, at Drexel University, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. david.b.smith@drexel.edu
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 2010 Jan-Feb;29(1):29-34
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chronic Disease
Cost Control - methods
Health Policy - trends
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data - trends
Health Services for the Aged
Health Services, Indigenous - economics - supply & distribution
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Long-Term Care - methods - organization & administration - standards - trends
Medicaid
Organizational Objectives
Quality of Health Care - standards
United States
Abstract
During the past century, long-term care in the United States has evolved through five cycles of development, each lasting approximately twenty years. Each, focusing on distinct concerns, produced unintended consequences. Each also added a layer to an accumulation of contradictory approaches--a patchwork system now pushed to the breaking point by increasing needs and financial pressures. Future policies must achieve a better synthesis of approaches inherited from the past, while addressing their unintended consequences. Foremost must be assuring access to essential care, delivery of high-quality services in an increasingly deinstitutionalized system, and a reduction in social and economic disparities.
PubMed ID
20048357 View in PubMed
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Accumulation of health disorders as a systemic measure of aging: Findings from the NLTCS data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80645
Source
Mech Ageing Dev. 2006 Nov;127(11):840-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Kulminski Alexander
Yashin Anatoli
Ukraintseva Svetlana
Akushevich Igor
Arbeev Konstantin
Land Kenneth
Manton Kenneth
Author Affiliation
Center for Demographic Studies, Duke University, 2117 Campus Drive, Box 90408, Durham, NC 27708, USA. Alexander.Kulminski@duke.edu
Source
Mech Ageing Dev. 2006 Nov;127(11):840-8
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Disease
Epidemiology
Female
Humans
Long-Term Care - statistics & numerical data
Male
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
BACKGROUND: An index of age-associated health/well-being disorders (deficits), called the "frailty index" (FI), appears to be a promising characteristic to capture dynamic variability in aging manifestations among age-peers. In this study we provide further support toward this view focusing on the analysis of the FI age patterns in the participants of the National Long Term Care Survey (NLTCS). METHODS: The NLTCS assessed health and functioning of the U.S. elderly in 1982, 1984, 1989, 1994, and 1999. Detailed information for our sample was assessed from about 26,700 interviews. The individual FI is defined as a proportion of health deficits for a given person. RESULTS: The FI in the NLTCS exhibits accelerated age patterns. The acceleration is larger for elderly who, at younger ages, had a lower FI (low FI group) than for those who showed a higher FI at younger ages (high FI group). Age-patterns for low and high FI groups tend to converge at advanced ages. The rate of deficit accumulation is sex-sensitive. CONCLUSIONS: The accelerated FI age patterns suggest that FI can be considered as a systemic measure of aging process. Convergence of the (sex-specific) FI age patterns for low and high FI groups by extreme ages might reflect the limit of the FI-specific (or systemic) age as well as the limit of adaptation capacity in aging individuals.
PubMed ID
16978683 View in PubMed
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Achieving best practice in long term care for Alaska Native and American Indian elders

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273782
Date
Sept-2005
1 National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders Achieving Best Practice in Long Term Care for Alaska Native and American Indian Elders Prepared by P. Kay Branch, M.A. Stacy L. Smith, MFA (Editor
  1 document  
Author
Branch, PK
Smith, SL
Author Affiliation
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
Sept-2005
Language
English
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Alaska
Alaska Native
American Indian
Home care
Long Term Care
Service models
Abstract
In rural Alaska, there are particular challenges in delivering services that may be typically available to seniors in more urban areas. There are, however, an increasing number of tribally operated programs in Alaska with a focus on Alaska Native values and traditions that are assisting families in keeping their loved ones close to home. These programs are the tribal health system's emerging best practices.
Documents

yr2_1best-practices.pdf

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1210 records – page 1 of 121.