Skip header and navigation

Refine By

91 records – page 1 of 10.

Adolescent alcohol use and binge drinking: an 18-year trend study of prevalence and correlates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267943
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2015 Mar;50(2):219-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Willy Pedersen
Tilmann von Soest
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2015 Mar;50(2):219-25
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Binge Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Conduct Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Family Relations
Female
Humans
Loneliness - psychology
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Sexual Behavior - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Social Isolation - psychology
Abstract
Several studies suggest a rapid decrease of alcohol use among adolescents after the turn of the century. With decreasing prevalence rates of smokers, a so-called hardening may have taken place, implying that remaining smokers are characterized by more psychosocial problems. Are similar processes witnessed among remaining adolescent alcohol users as well?
In 1992, 2002 and 2010 we used identical procedures to collect data from three population-based samples of 16- and 17-year-old Norwegians (n = 9207). We collected data on alcohol consumption, binge drinking, parental factors, use of other substances, conduct problems, depressive symptoms, social integration, sexual behaviour and loneliness.
There was a steep increase in all measures of alcohol consumption from 1992 to 2002, followed by a similar decline until 2010. Most correlates remained stable over the time span.
Alcohol use was consistently related to psychosocial problems; on the other hand, alcohol users reported higher levels of social acceptance and social integration than did non-users. There were no signs of 'hardening' as seen for tobacco use.
PubMed ID
25557608 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are high school students living in lodgings at an increased risk for internalizing problems?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98963
Source
J Adolesc. 2010 Jun;33(3):439-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Wenche Wannebo
Lars Wichstrøm
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, Nord-Trøndelag University College, Steinkjer, Norway. wenche.wannebo@hint.no
Source
J Adolesc. 2010 Jun;33(3):439-47
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Behavioral Symptoms - diagnosis - psychology
Depression - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Internal-External Control
Loneliness - psychology
Male
Norway
Object Attachment
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Sex Factors
Social Environment
Students - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate whether leaving home to live in lodgings during senior high school can be a risk factor for the development of internalizing problems. Utilizing two large-scale prospective community studies of 2399 and 3906 Norwegian students (age range 15-19 years), respectively, the difference in internalizing symptoms between adolescents living in lodgings and adolescents living with their parents during senior high school was examined. Female students living in lodgings had higher scores on internalizing problems than female students living at home, whereas no differences were found for males. Living in lodgings did not predict later internalizing problems, and prior internalizing problems did not predict moving into lodgings. It is therefore suggested that the negative effect of living in lodgings on high school students' well-being is temporary.
PubMed ID
19631976 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between depressive symptoms and age, sex, loneliness and treatment among older people in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267237
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2015;19(6):560-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Ingrid Djukanovic
Kimmo Sorjonen
Ulla Peterson
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2015;19(6):560-8
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Loneliness - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of and the association between depressive symptoms and loneliness in relation to age and sex among older people (65-80 years) and to investigate to what extent those who report depressive symptoms had visited a health care professional and/or used antidepressant medication.
A cross-sectional study was conducted in a Swedish sample randomized from the total population in the age group 65-80 years (n = 6659). Chi square tests and logistic regression analyses were conducted.
The data showed that 9.8% (n = 653) reported depressive symptoms and 27.5% reported feelings of loneliness. More men than women reported depressive symptoms, and the largest proportion was found among men in the age group 75-80 years. An association between the odds to have a depressive disorder and loneliness was found which, however, decreased with increasing age. Of those with depressive symptoms a low proportion had visited a psychologist (2.9%) or a welfare officer (4.2%), and one in four reported that they use antidepressant medication. Of those who reported depressive symptoms, 29% considered that they had needed medical care during the last three months but had refrained from seeking, and the most common reason for that was negative experience from previous visits.
Contrary to findings in most of the studies, depressive symptoms were not more prevalent among women. The result highlights the importance of detecting depressive symptoms and loneliness in older people and to offer adequate treatment in order to increase their well-being.
PubMed ID
25266255 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between social capital and loneliness in different age groups: a population-based study in Western Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285423
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016 Jul 11;16:542
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-11-2016
Author
Fredrica Nyqvist
Christina R Victor
Anna K Forsman
Mima Cattan
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016 Jul 11;16:542
Date
Jul-11-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Loneliness - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Social capital
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Previous studies of loneliness have largely focused on establishing risk factors in specific age groups such as in later life or in young people. Researchers have paid less attention to the link between social capital and loneliness across different age groups. The aim of this study was to examine the association between social capital and experienced loneliness in different age groups in a Finnish setting.
The data originates from a population-based cross-sectional survey conducted among 4618 people aged 15-80 in Western Finland in 2011. The response rate was 46.2 %. The association between social capital, measured by frequency of social contacts, participation in organisational activities, trust and sense of belonging to the neighbourhood and loneliness was tested by logistic regression analyses stratified by four age groups.
Frequent loneliness (defined as experienced often or sometimes) was higher among younger people (39.5 %) compared to older people (27.3 %). Low levels of trust were linked to loneliness in all four age groups. The association between other aspects of social capital and loneliness varied across age groups.
Frequent loneliness is common among the general adult population and could be seen as a public health issue. Our findings imply that low social capital, especially in terms of low trust, may be a risk factor for loneliness. However, further research is needed to assess the influence of poor health and reverse causality as explanations for the findings.
Notes
Cites: Gerontology. 2006;52(3):181-716645299
Cites: Psychol Bull. 2013 Jan;139(1):53-8022642230
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2009 Feb;44(2):161-819167665
Cites: Can J Aging. 2004 Summer;23(2):157-6815334815
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2014 Mar;18(2):194-20623895066
Cites: Eur J Ageing. 2009 Jun;6(2):91-10019517025
Cites: Psychol Aging. 2002 Mar;17(1):116-2411931280
Cites: Health Place. 2008 Jun;14(2):243-5317686647
Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(4):394-41023186534
Cites: Gerontologist. 2011 Jun;51(3):379-8821097553
Cites: Int J Nurs Stud. 2008 Jul;45(7):1042-5417658532
Cites: J Clin Nurs. 2006 Mar;15(3):334-4016466483
Cites: Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2008 Dec;23(12):1213-2118537197
Cites: J Health Psychol. 2006 Nov;11(6):863-7517035259
Cites: Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2010 Aug;36(8):1086-10020585058
Cites: Health Place. 2014 Jul;28:187-9324911971
Cites: Int J Equity Health. 2006 Apr 05;5:316597324
Cites: J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2008 Nov;63(6):S375-8419092047
Cites: J Psychol. 2012 Jan-Apr;146(1-2):85-10422303614
Cites: J Aging Health. 2006 Jun;18(3):359-8416648391
Cites: Attach Hum Dev. 2004 Dec;6(4):353-7015764124
Cites: Science. 2006 Jun 30;312(5782):1913-516809530
Cites: J Aging Health. 2013 Sep;25(6):1013-3523988810
PubMed ID
27400659 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between emotional distress and heavy drinking among young people: A longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279021
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2016 Mar;35(2):170-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Hilde Pape
Thor Norström
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2016 Mar;35(2):170-6
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety - epidemiology
Binge Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Loneliness - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study adds to the meagre body of longitudinal research on the link between emotional distress and alcohol use among young people. We address the following research questions: Are symptoms of anxiety and depressed mood likely to be causally related to heavy episodic drinking (HED)? Does the association change as individuals move from adolescence to early adulthood?
Data stemmed from a national sample of young people in Norway that was assessed in 1992 (T1; mean age?=?14.9 years), 1994 (T2), 1999 (T3) and 2005 (T4) (response rate: 60%, n?=?2171). We applied fixed-effects modelling, implying that intra-individual changes in the frequency of HED were regressed on intra-individual changes in emotional distress. Hence, confounding due to stable underlying influences was eliminated. Self-perceived loneliness was included as a time-varying covariate.
Emotional distress was unrelated to HED in adolescence (T1 to T2). In the transition from adolescence to early adulthood (T2 to T3), changes in depressiveness were positively and independently associated with changes in HED, whereas changes symptoms of anxiety were not. A similar pattern emerged in early adulthood (T3 to T4).
The potential causal relationship between emotional distress and heavy drinking did not manifest itself in adolescence, but increased symptoms of depressiveness were related to more frequent HED in subsequent periods of life. Hence, this study provides conditional support to the notion that emotional distress and HED may be causally related and indicates that the association among young people may be specific to depressiveness.
PubMed ID
26094994 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations of deliberate self-harm with loneliness, self-rated health and life satisfaction in adolescence: Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107715
Source
Pages 162-168 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):162-168
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Anna Reetta Rönkä
Anja Taanila
Markku Koiranen
Vappu Sunnari
Arja Rautio
Author Affiliation
Women's and Gender Studies, Faculty of Education, University of Oulu, Finland. anna.r.ronka@oulu.fi
Source
Pages 162-168 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):162-168
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adolescent
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Loneliness - psychology
Male
Personal Satisfaction
Risk factors
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology - psychology
Sex Factors
Abstract
Deliberate self-harm (DSH) is an act with a non-fatal outcome in which an individual initiates a behavior, such as self-cutting or burning, with the intention of inflicting harm on his or her self. Interpersonal difficulties have been shown to be a risk factor for DSH, but the association between subjective experience of loneliness and DSH have rarely been examined.
To examine the frequency of DSH or its ideation and loneliness among 16-year-olds to determine if associations exist between DSH and loneliness, loneliness-related factors, self-rated health and satisfaction with life.
The study population (n = 7,014) was taken from Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 (N = 9,432). Cross-tabulations were used to describe the frequency of DSH by factors selected by gender. Logistic regression analysis was used to describe the association between DSH and loneliness and other selected factors.
Nearly 8.7% (n = 608) of adolescents reported DSH often/sometimes during the preceding 6 months, with girls (n = 488, 13.4%) reporting DSH almost 4 times than that of boys (n = 120, 3.6%). Nearly 3.2% of the adolescents (girls: n = 149, 4.1%; boys: n = 72, 2.2%) expressed that the statement I feel lonely was very/often true, and 26.4% (girls: n = 1,265, 34.8%; boys: n = 585, 17.4%) expressed that the statement was somewhat/sometimes true. Logistic regression showed that those who reported to be very/often lonely (girls: odds ratio (OR) 4.1; boys: OR 3.2), somewhat/sometimes lonely (girls: OR 2.4; boys: OR 2.4) were dissatisfied with life (girls: OR 3.3; boys: OR 3.3), felt unliked (girls: OR 2.2; boys: OR 6.0) and had moderate self-rated health (girls: OR 2.0; boys: OR 1.7), were more likely to report DSH than those without these feelings.
The results show that loneliness is associated with DSH, and that loneliness should be considered as a risk for individual health and well-being.
Notes
Cites: J Clin Child Psychol. 2000 Mar;29(1):119-2810693038
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2009 Aug;44(8):601-719023507
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Jun;68(3):204-1119705653
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Jun;68(3):235-4819705656
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Jun;68(3):274-9119705659
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2011 Sep;52(9):984-9121294729
Cites: Scand J Psychol. 2011 Oct;52(5):476-8321585393
Cites: Lancet. 2012 Jun 23;379(9834):2373-8222726518
Cites: Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Oct;66(5):320-822242914
Cites: Psychosom Med. 2002 May-Jun;64(3):407-1712021415
Cites: J Adolesc. 2002 Jun;25(3):327-3912128043
Cites: BMJ. 2002 Nov 23;325(7374):1207-1112446536
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2004 Jan;94(1):89-9514713704
Cites: J Adolesc. 2004 Jun;27(3):351-6215159093
Cites: Med J Aust. 2004 Aug 2;181(3):140-415287831
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2004 Sep;43(9):1134-4515322417
Cites: Clin Psychol Rev. 2004 Dec;24(8):957-7915533280
Cites: Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2005 Jun;35(3):239-5016156486
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2005 Nov;40(11):912-2116245189
Cites: Clin Psychol Rev. 2006 Oct;26(6):695-71816952717
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2007 Jul;161(7):641-917606826
Cites: Pediatr Int. 2009 Feb;51(1):120-519371291
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2000 Jul;39(7):868-7510892228
PubMed ID
23984286 View in PubMed
Documents
Less detail

Being in a Bubble: the experience of loneliness among frail older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277468
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2016 Mar;72(3):631-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Elin Taube
Ulf Jakobsson
Patrik Midlöv
Jimmie Kristensson
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2016 Mar;72(3):631-40
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Frail Elderly - psychology
Humans
Loneliness - psychology
Male
Social Isolation - psychology
Social Participation - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore the experience of loneliness among frail older people living at home.
Loneliness is a threat to the physical and psychological well-being with serious consequences if left unattended. There are associations between frailty and poor psychological well-being, implying that frail older people who experience loneliness are vulnerable.
Qualitative content analysis, focusing on both latent and manifest content.
Frail older people (65+ years), living at home and who have experienced various levels in intensity of loneliness, were purposively selected from a larger interventional study (N = 12). For this study, 'frail' means being dependent in activities of daily life and having repeated contacts with healthcare services. Data were collected between December 2009-August 2011. Semi-structured interviews were performed, audio recorded and transcribed verbatim.
The analysis resulted in the overall theme 'Being in a Bubble', which illustrates an experience of living in an ongoing world, but excluded because of the participants' social surroundings and the impossibility to regain losses. The theme 'Barriers' was interpreted as facing physical, psychological and social barriers for overcoming loneliness. The theme 'Hopelessness' reveals the experience when not succeeding in overcoming these barriers, including seeing loneliness as a constant state. A positive co-existing dimension of loneliness, offering independence, was reflected in the theme 'Freedom'.
The findings suggest that future strategies for intervening should target the frail older persons' individual barriers and promoting the positive co-existing dimension of loneliness. When caring, a person centred approach, encompassing knowledge regarding physical and psychological aspects, including loneliness, is recommended.
PubMed ID
26568280 View in PubMed
Less detail

Case-control study of unemployment and parasuicide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160692
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 2007 Nov-Dec;48(6):511-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Stephen C Newman
Roger C Bland
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Mackenzie Centre, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2B7. stephen.newman@ualberta.ca
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 2007 Nov-Dec;48(6):511-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Divorce
Family Relations
Female
Humans
Loneliness - psychology
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology
Social Support
Unemployment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The objective of the study was to estimate the odds ratio for the association between unemployment and parasuicide, controlling for potential confounding variables.
A case-control study was conducted involving 507 cases of parasuicide and 200 age- and sex-matched controls presenting to emergency departments in Edmonton, Canada. Subjects were interviewed using an extensive questionnaire developed for a World Health Organization study of parasuicide. The data were analyzed using conditional logistic regression.
In a crude analysis, the odds ratio for the association between unemployment and parasuicide was 12.0 (95% confidence interval, 6.0-23.9). After controlling for sociodemographic factors, lifetime prevalence of several Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Revised Third Edition, disorders, previous parasuicide, hopelessness, childhood experiences, and emotional support from family and friends, the odds ratio was 5.2 (95% confidence interval, 2.3-11.4).
Those who are unemployed have an increased risk of parasuicide, and this association persists after accounting for a wide range of potential confounders.
PubMed ID
17954135 View in PubMed
Less detail

Chronic pain among community-dwelling elderly: a population-based clinical study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282167
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2016 Jun;34(2):159-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Susanna Rapo-Pylkkö
Maija Haanpää
Helena Liira
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2016 Jun;34(2):159-64
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetaminophen - therapeutic use
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analgesics, Non-Narcotic - therapeutic use
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Chronic Pain - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fatigue - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
House Calls
Humans
Independent living
Loneliness - psychology
Male
Neuralgia - complications
Quality of Life
Sex Distribution
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
To present the occurrence, characteristics, etiology, interference, and medication of chronic pain among the elderly living independently at home.
A total of 460 subjects in three cohorts aged 75, 80 and 85 years respectively received visits by communal home-care department nurses for a cross-sectional survey. Of them, 175 had chronic (duration = 3 months) pain with an average intensity of = 4/10 and/or = moderate interference in daily life.
Clinical assessment was performed for consenting subjects to define the location, intensity, etiology, type, interference and medications of chronic pain.
According to home visits, elderly people with chronic pain rated their health and mobility worse and felt sadder, lonelier and more tired than those without chronic pain. A geriatrician made clinical assessments for 106 patients with chronic pain in 2009-2013. Of them, 66 had three, 35 had two and 5 had one pain condition. The worst pain was musculoskeletal in 88 (83%) of patients. Pain was pure nociceptive in 61 (58%), pure neuropathic in 9 (8%), combined nociceptive and neuropathic pain in 34 (32%), and idiopathic in 2 (2%) patients. On a numerical rating scale from 0 to 10, the mean and maximal intensity of the worst pain was 5.7 and 7.7, respectively, while the mean pain interference was 5.9. Mean pain intensity and maximal pain intensity decreased by age. Duration of pain was longer than 5 years in 51 (48%) patients. Regular pain medication was used by 82 (77%) patients, most commonly paracetamol or NSAIDs. Although pain limited the lives of the elderly with chronic pain, they were as satisfied with their lives as those without chronic pain.
Elderly people in our study often suffered from chronic pain, mostly musculoskeletal pain, and the origin of pain was neuropathic in up to 40% of these cases. However, elderly people with chronic pain rarely used the medications specifically for neuropathic pain. Based on increased loneliness, sadness and tiredness, as well as decreased subjective health and mobility, the quality of life was decreased among those with chronic pain compared with those without pain. KEY POINTS It is known that chronic pain is one of the most common reasons for general practice consultations and is more common in women than men. In our study using detailed clinical examinations, up to 40% of patients with chronic pain in cohorts aged 75, 80 and 85 years suffered from neuropathic pain. However, only a few elderly people with chronic pain used medications specifically for chronic pain, which may be due to side effects or non-willingness to experiment with these drugs. Elderly people with chronic pain rated their health and mobility to be worse and felt sadder, lonelier and more tired but were not less satisfied with their lives than those without chronic pain.
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Nov 12;290(18):2435-4214612480
Cites: Pain. 1996 Sep;67(1):29-348895228
Cites: Pain. 2015 Mar;156(3):521-725599240
Cites: Eur J Pain. 2002;6(5):375-8512160512
Cites: JAMA. 2014 Aug 27;312(8):825-3625157726
Cites: Pain Med. 2013 Nov;14(11):1664-7224118796
Cites: Br J Anaesth. 2013 Jul;111(1):13-823794640
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 2009 Aug;38(2 Suppl):S4-S1419671470
Cites: Drugs Aging. 2015 Sep;32(9):737-4226363908
Cites: Clin Interv Aging. 2013;8:37-4623355774
Cites: Ann Pharmacother. 2005 Jan;39(1):11-615598966
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015;33(4):243-5126553225
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2013 Jun;31(2):73-823621352
Cites: Age Ageing. 2005 Sep;34(5):462-616043446
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2007 Aug;57(541):630-517688757
Cites: Age Ageing. 2013 Mar;42 Suppl 1:i1-5723420266
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Feb 27;287(8):1022-811866651
Cites: Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2013 Jan-Feb;56(1):285-923022058
PubMed ID
27065337 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparisons of the discrepancy between loneliness and social isolation across Ireland and Sweden: findings from TILDA and SNAC-K.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310659
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2019 Sep; 54(9):1079-1088
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2019
Author
Joanna E McHugh Power
Linnea Sjöberg
Frank Kee
Rose Ann Kenny
Brian Lawlor
Author Affiliation
School of Business, National College of Ireland, IFSC, Mayor Street, Dublin 1, Ireland. mchughje@tcd.ie.
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2019 Sep; 54(9):1079-1088
Date
Sep-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition
Cohort Studies
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Humans
Ireland
Loneliness - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Multilevel Analysis
Social Isolation - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Loneliness may have different cultural meanings in different countries. This may manifest as differing levels of Social Asymmetry-the discrepancy between loneliness and social isolation. Since loneliness is thought to be low in Sweden relative to more southerly countries, we hypothesised that more number of individuals would also fall into the "discordant robust" category of Social Asymmetry, i.e. that more individuals in Sweden would have lower loneliness levels relative to social isolation than in Ireland. We also explored the clinical relevance of Social Asymmetry in both countries, by examining its association with cognitive functioning.
We derived Social Asymmetry metrics in two representative cohort studies: the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) and the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care in Kungsholmen (SNAC-K). Data pertaining to a dementia-free sample of 4565 Irish participants and 3042 Swedish participants, all aged over 60 years, were analysed using a multilevel modelling approach, with country as a higher-order variable.
Contrary to the expected, more individuals in Ireland were "discordant robust" than in Sweden. We also found evidence for superior performance in global cognitive functioning among those in the "discordant robust" category relative to those in the discordant susceptible (i.e. those with higher levels of loneliness than social isolation) category, ß?=?0.61, p?
PubMed ID
30863870 View in PubMed
Less detail

91 records – page 1 of 10.