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146 records – page 1 of 15.

[An attempt at an historical analysis of epidemics of the XIV-XVII centuries].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104032
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1966 May;43(5):153-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1966 May

[An attempt at an historical analysis of epidemics of the XIV-XVII centuries].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111920
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1966 May;43(5):153-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1966

An international/multicentre report on patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) over the age of 40 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155577
Source
J Cyst Fibros. 2008 Nov;7(6):537-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Margaret E Hodson
Nicholas J Simmonds
Warren J Warwick
Elizabeth Tullis
Carlo Castellani
Baroukh Assael
John A Dodge
Mary Corey
Author Affiliation
Department of Cystic Fibrosis, Royal Brompton Hospital/Imperial College, London SW3 6NP, UK. m.hodson@imperial.ac.uk
Source
J Cyst Fibros. 2008 Nov;7(6):537-42
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Canada
Cohort Studies
Cystic Fibrosis - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Italy
Life expectancy
London
Longevity
Male
Middle Aged
Minnesota
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Survival Rate
Abstract
The lifespan of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is increasing significantly. The objective of this international pilot study was to study the characteristics of these long-term survivors.
Four centres with large CF clinics from London (UK), Minneapolis (USA), Toronto (Canada) and Verona (Italy) identified 366 patients who had survived 40 years and longer.
At all centres males survived longer than females. There were more pancreatic sufficient patients in Verona (60%) and Toronto (40%) than in London (16%) and Minneapolis (21%). The percentage of DeltaF508 homozygous patients varied between 47% in London and 45% in Minneapolis to only 26% in Toronto and 9% in Verona. Average FEV(1) and BMI values of the surviving population appeared to stabilise after 40 years of age. FEV(1) was on average 12% higher in patients who were pancreatic sufficient (p > 0.0001). There was no difference in survival between the centres. The overall median survival after the age of 40 was 13 years. The estimated annual death rate was approximately 3.4% from the age of 40-60 years.
Significant numbers of patients are now surviving to 40 years or more, and it is hoped that an in-depth study of these patients may identify the factors contributing to longer survival.
PubMed ID
18715831 View in PubMed
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Are cardiac transplant patients more likely to have periodontitis? A case record study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53567
Source
J Int Acad Periodontol. 2002 Jul;4(3):95-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
Jan Lessem
Connie Drisko
Henry Greenwell
Rutger Persson
Hubert Newman
Graham Smart
Lydia Hopkins
Jayan Parameshwar
Daniel Fishbein
C. Partridge
G. Bhat
J. Goldsmith
Author Affiliation
OraPharma Inc, Warminster, PA 18974, USA. lessem@orapharma.com
Source
J Int Acad Periodontol. 2002 Jul;4(3):95-100
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alveolar Bone Loss - pathology
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Dental Records
Female
Heart Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Kentucky
London
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology
Odds Ratio
Periodontitis - complications
Risk factors
Sweden
Washington
Abstract
In several large epidemiological studies chronic periodontitis has been implicated as an additional risk factor, independent of other risk factors, for the development of ischaemic heart disease. The underlying mechanism is thought to be a localised infection giving rise to an inflammatory host response, and some experimental data agree with this hypothesis. Recently, however, some studies have questioned the post dated relationship between the two diseases. The current case-record study was undertaken to evaluate the prevalence of chronic periodontitis and the severity of such periodontal disease in a heart transplant population, assuming the latter represented a relatively severely compromised cardiovascular patient population. The study demonstrated that 76% of the patients had various degrees of periodontal disease prior to undergoing a heart transplant. Thus, it is possible that a relationship between cardiovascular disease and periodontal disease exists, but further, large intervention studies will be needed to confirm such a conclusion.
PubMed ID
12670088 View in PubMed
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Asperger syndrome--some epidemiological considerations: a research note.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38104
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 1989 Jul;30(4):631-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1989
Author
I C Gillberg
C. Gillberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 1989 Jul;30(4):631-8
Date
Jul-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Autistic Disorder - epidemiology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
London
Sweden
Syndrome
Abstract
Asperger syndrome has so far been the subject of very little systematic empirical inquiry. This paper reviews those few studies in the literature and some data from a new Swedish study which has reported findings pertinent to estimations of Asperger syndrome prevalence. It is concluded that among children with normal intelligence, rates of 10-26 per 10,000 children are minimum figures. Another 0.4 per 10,000 Swedish teenagers showed the combination of Asperger syndrome and mild mental retardation.
PubMed ID
2670981 View in PubMed
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Attainment and adjustment in two geographical areas. II--The prevalence of specific reading retardation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252183
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 1975 Jun;126:510-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1975
Author
M. Berger
W. Yule
M. Rutter
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 1975 Jun;126:510-9
Date
Jun-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Channel Islands
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - complications
Dyslexia - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
London
Male
Sex Factors
Verbal Behavior
Wechsler Scales
Abstract
Specific reading retardation was found to occur in a minimum of 9-9 per cent of ten-year-old 'indigenous' children in one inner London borough. This rate was nearly three times that (3-9 per cent) in Isle of Wight children. There was a comparably higher rate of general reading backwardness in London (19-0 per cent vs 8-3 per cent). Since the same epidemiological methods were followed in the two areas, and since the reading-retarded children had similar psychological characteristics in both cases, it is concluded that there is a real difference between London and the Isle of Wight in the prevalence of reading retardation and of reading backwardness.
PubMed ID
1174768 View in PubMed
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Autism, ethnicity and maternal immigration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97501
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2010 Apr;196:274-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
D V Keen
F D Reid
D. Arnone
Author Affiliation
Consultant Neurodevelopmental Paediatrician, Room 2.35, 2nd Floor Clare House, St George's Hospital, Blackshaw Road, London SW17 0QT, UK. daphne.keen@stgeorges.nhs.uk
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2010 Apr;196:274-81
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Child
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive - ethnology - etiology
Child, Preschool
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
London - epidemiology
Male
Mothers - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A growing number of European studies, particularly from Nordic countries, suggest an increased frequency of autism in children of immigrant parents. In contrast, North American studies tend to conclude that neither maternal ethnicity nor immigrant status are related to the rate of autism-spectrum disorders. AIMS: To examine the hypotheses that maternal ethnicity and/or immigration are linked to the rate of childhood autism-spectrum disorders. METHOD: Retrospective case-note analysis of all 428 children diagnosed with autism-spectrum disorders presenting to the child development services in two centres during a 6-year period. RESULTS: Mothers born outside Europe had a significantly higher risk of having a child with an autism-spectrum disorder compared with those born in the UK, with the highest risk observed for the Caribbean group (relative risks (RRs) in the two centres: RR = 10.01, 95% CI 5.53-18.1 and RR = 8.89, 95% CI 5.08-15.5). Mothers of Black ethnicity had a significantly higher risk compared with White mothers (RR = 8.28, 95% CI 5.41-12.7 and RR = 3.84, 95% CI 2.93-5.02). Analysis of ethnicity and immigration factors together suggests the increased risk is predominately related to immigration. CONCLUSIONS: Maternal immigration is associated with substantial increased risk of autism-spectrum disorders with differential risk according to different region of birth and possibly ethnicity.
PubMed ID
20357302 View in PubMed
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146 records – page 1 of 15.