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Alcohol use and incarceration adversely affect HIV-1 RNA suppression among injection drug users starting antiretroviral therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182124
Source
J Urban Health. 2003 Dec;80(4):667-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Anita Palepu
Mark W Tyndall
Kathy Li
Benita Yip
Michael V O'Shaughnessy
Martin T Schechter
Julio S G Montaner
Robert S Hogg
Author Affiliation
All the authors are with the University of British Columbia, British Columbia, Canada. anita@hivnet.ubc.ca
Source
J Urban Health. 2003 Dec;80(4):667-75
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active
British Columbia - epidemiology
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Female
HIV Infections - drug therapy - virology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Patient compliance
Prisons
RNA, Viral - blood
Statistics, nonparametric
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - complications
Abstract
We conducted this study among HIV-infected injection drug users to determine the effect of self-reported alcohol use and prior incarceration at the time of initiating antiretroviral therapy on subsequent HIV-1 RNA suppression. We examined the demographics, recent incarceration history, and drug and alcohol use history from the Vancouver Injection Drug User Study (VIDUS) questionnaire closest to the date of initiating antiretroviral therapy. We linked these data to the HIV/AIDS Drug Treatment Program. There were 234 VIDUS participants who accessed antiretroviral therapy through the Drug Treatment Program from August 1, 1996, to July 31, 2001. In terms of illicit drug use, 196 (84%) reported injecting heroin and cocaine at the time of initiating antiretroviral therapy. Multiple logistic regression revealed that in the 6 months prior to initiating antiretroviral therapy, alcohol use (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.32; 95% CI 0.13-0.81) and incarceration (AOR 0.22; 95% CI 0.09-0.58) were independently associated with lower odds of HIV-1 RNA suppression. Factors positively associated with HIV-1 RNA suppression included: adherence (AOR 1.27; 95% CI 1.06-1.51); lower baseline HIV-1 RNA (AOR 1.30; 95% CI 1.01-1.66); highly active antiretroviral therapy (AOR 4.10; 95% CI 1.56-10.6); months on therapy (AOR 1.1; 95% CI 1.06-1.14). Among HIV-infected injection drug users who were on antiretroviral therapy, any alcohol use and incarceration in the 6 months prior to initiating antiretroviral therapy were negatively associated with achieving HIV-1 RNA suppression. In addition to addiction treatment for active heroin and cocaine use, the identification and treatment of alcohol problems should be supported in this setting. As well, increased outreach to HIV-infected drug users recently released from prison to ensure continuity of care needs to be further developed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
14709714 View in PubMed
Less detail

Factors associated with public injecting among users of Vancouver's supervised injection facility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163582
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2007;33(2):319-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Ian McKnight
Ben Maas
Evan Wood
Mark W Tyndall
Will Small
Calvin Lai
Julio S G Montaner
Thomas Kerr
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2007;33(2):319-25
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Preventive Health Services
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
We evaluated factors associated with public drug injection among a cohort of injection drug users (SEOSI) originally recruited from within Vancouver's supervised injecting facility (SIF).
We used univariate statistics and logistic regression to examine factors associated with public drug injection among SEOSI participants.
Between June 2004 and July 2005, 714 IDU were followed up as part of SEOSI. In multivariate analyses, factors associated with public drug injection included homelessness (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 3.10; p
PubMed ID
17497555 View in PubMed
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Factors predictive of 30-day postoperative mortality in HIV/AIDS patients in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124448
Source
Ann Surg. 2012 Jul;256(1):170-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Sam M Wiseman
Jamie I Forrest
Joe E Chan
Wendy Zhang
Benita Yip
Robert S Hogg
Viviane D Lima
Julio S G Montaner
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, St Paul's Hospital & Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. smwiseman@providencehealth.bc.ca
Source
Ann Surg. 2012 Jul;256(1):170-6
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - mortality
Adult
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active
British Columbia - epidemiology
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Female
HIV Infections - drug therapy - mortality
Hospitalization
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Factors that predict HIV (human immunodeficiency virus)/AIDS patient postoperative mortality have remained poorly defined.
The primary objective of this study was to identify factors predictive of short-term, postoperative mortality in HIV/AIDS patients. The secondary objective of this study was to develop a scoring system that would predict short-term postoperative mortality in HIV/AIDS patients.
We retrospectively reviewed all HIV/AIDS patients who underwent surgical procedures in British Columbia, Canada, between April 1995 and March 2002. The primary outcome evaluated was 30-day postoperative mortality. Demographic, clinical, and hospitalization-related data were obtained and utilized to predict outcomes using a logistic regression model.
A total of 2305 procedures were carried out on 1322 patients during the study period. Admissions were classified as urgent/emergent for 1311 procedures (57%) and the overall 30-day postoperative mortality was 9.5% (126 deaths). Urgent/emergent admission, older age, prior surgery, a CD4 cell count of = 50 cells/mm, a hemoglobin level = 120 g/L, and a white blood cell count >11 g/L within 90 days before the surgical procedure was predictive of an increased 30-day postoperative mortality in a multivariate model. Using these variables, we formulated the HIV Surgical Mortality Score (HSMS) to obtain the median-estimated probability of postoperative death.
For accurate preoperative mortality risk stratification for HIV/AIDS patients, we have found that several clinical and laboratory variables must be evaluated. If appropriately validated, our proposed HSMS could be utilized to estimate the probability of short-term postoperative death among HIV/AIDS patients.
PubMed ID
22580943 View in PubMed
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High rates of homelessness among a cohort of street-involved youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158172
Source
Health Place. 2009 Mar;15(1):10-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Beth S Rachlis
Evan Wood
Ruth Zhang
Julio S G Montaner
Thomas Kerr
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital, 608-1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6Z 1Y6.
Source
Health Place. 2009 Mar;15(1):10-7
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Homeless Youth - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Prospective Studies
Risk-Taking
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Violence
Young Adult
Abstract
Using multivariate logistic regression, we examined the prevalence and correlates of homelessness among youth enrolled in a community-recruited prospective cohort known as the At-Risk Youth Study (ARYS), between September 2005 and October 2006. Of 478 individuals included in this analysis, 132 (27.6%) were female and 120 (25.1%) self-identified as Aboriginal. The median age was 22 (IQR: 20-24). In total, 284 (56.9%) participants reported baseline homelessness, with most living either at no fixed address, on the street, or in a hostel or shelter. Factors associated with homelessness included public injecting, frequent crack use, experienced violence, having less than a high-school education, and not having been in any addiction treatment. Homeless individuals were at-risk for various adverse health outcomes. These findings indicate the need for additional interventions, including residential addiction treatment, to address homelessness and drug use among youth.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18358759 View in PubMed
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HIV antiviral drug resistance: patient comprehension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142120
Source
AIDS Care. 2010 Jul;22(7):816-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
C Sarai Racey
Wendy Zhang
Eirikka K Brandson
Kimberly A Fernandes
Despina Tzemis
P Richard Harrigan
Julio S G Montaner
Rolando Barrios
Junine Toy
Robert S Hogg
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada. sarai.racey@gmail.com
Source
AIDS Care. 2010 Jul;22(7):816-26
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active - psychology
British Columbia
Comprehension
Drug Resistance, Viral
Female
HIV - drug effects
HIV Seropositivity - drug therapy - psychology
Health Education - methods
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
A patient's understanding and use of healthcare information can affect their decisions regarding treatment. Better patient understanding about HIV resistance may improve adherence to therapy, decrease population viral load and extend the use of first-line HIV therapies. We examined knowledge of developing HIV resistance and explored treatment outcomes in a cohort of HIV+ persons on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The longitudinal investigations into supportive and ancillary health services (LISA) cohort is a prospective study of HIV+ persons on HAART. A comprehensive interviewer-administrated survey collected socio-demographic variables. Drug resistance knowledge was determined using a three-part definition. Clinical markers were collected through linkage with the Drug Treatment Program (DTP) at the British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS. Categorical variables were compared using Fisher's Exact Test and continuous variables using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Proportional odds logistic regression was performed for the adjusted multivariable analysis. Of 457 LISA participants, less than 4% completely defined HIV resistance and 20% reported that they had not discussed resistance with their physician. Overall, 61% of the cohort is >or=95% adherent based on prescription refills. Owing to small numbers pooling was preformed for analyses. The model showed that being younger (OR=0.97, 95% CI: 0.95-0.99), having greater than high school education (OR=1.64, 95% CI: 1.07-2.51), discussing medication with physicians (OR=3.67, 95% CI: 1.76-7.64), having high provider trust (OR=1.02, 95% CI: 1.01-1.03), and receiving one-to-one counseling by a pharmacist (OR=2.14, 95% CI: 1.41-3.24) are predictive of a complete or partial definition of HIV resistance. The probability of completely defining HIV resistance increased from 15.8 to 63.9% if respondents had discussed HIV medication with both a physician and a pharmacist. Although the understanding of HIV resistance showed no differences in treatment outcomes in this cohort, overall adherence and complete understanding of HIV resistance were low. If patient understanding could be improved through discussions with physicians and pharmacists, potential exists to enhance overall adherence and treatment outcomes.
PubMed ID
20635245 View in PubMed
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The impact of unstable housing on emergency department use in a cohort of HIV-positive people in a Canadian setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114058
Source
AIDS Care. 2014 Jan;26(1):53-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Surita Parashar
Keith Chan
David Milan
Eric Grafstein
Alexis K Palmer
Chelsey Rhodes
Julio S G Montaner
Robert S Hogg
Author Affiliation
a BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS , St. Paul's Hospital , Vancouver , BC , Canada.
Source
AIDS Care. 2014 Jan;26(1):53-64
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Retroviral Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Female
HIV Infections - drug therapy - psychology
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Misuse - statistics & numerical data
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Housing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The social-structural challenges experienced by people living with HIV (PHA) have been shown to contribute to increased use of the emergency department (ED). This study identified factors associated with frequent and nonurgent ED use within a cohort of people accessing antiretroviral therapy (ART) in a Canadian setting. Interviewer-administered surveys collected socio-demographic information; clinical variables were obtained through linkages with the provincial drug treatment registry; and ED admission data were abstracted from the Department of Emergency Medicine database. Multivariate logistic regression was used to compute odds of frequent and nonurgent ED use. Unstable housing was independently associated with ED use (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =1.94, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.24-3.04]), having three or more ED visits within 6 months of the interview date [AOR: 2.03 (95% CI: 1.07-3.83)] and being triaged as nonurgent (AOR = 2.71, 95% CI: 1.19-6.17). Frequent and nonurgent use of the ED in this setting is associated with conditions requiring interventions at the social-structural level. Supportive housing may contribute to decreased health-care costs and improved health outcomes amongst marginalized PHA.
PubMed ID
23656484 View in PubMed
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Injection drug use among street-involved youth in a Canadian setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150568
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:171
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Thomas Kerr
Brandon D L Marshall
Cari Miller
Kate Shannon
Ruth Zhang
Julio S G Montaner
Evan Wood
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St, Paul's Hospital, British Columbia, Canada. uhri-tk@cfenet.ubc.ca.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:171
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
British Columbia - epidemiology
Drug Overdose
Female
Hepatitis C - epidemiology
Homeless Youth
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Prostitution
Risk-Taking
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Street-involved youth contend with an array of health and social challenges, including elevated rates of blood-borne infections and mortality. In addition, there has been growing concern regarding high-risk drug use among street-involved youth, in particular injection drug use. We undertook this study to examine the prevalence of injection drug use and associated risks among street-involved youth in Vancouver, Canada.
From September 2005 to November 2007, baseline data were collected for the At-Risk Youth Study (ARYS), a prospective cohort of street-recruited youth aged 14 to 26 in Vancouver, Canada. Using multiple logistic regression, we compared youth with and without a history of injection.
The sample included 560 youth among whom the median age was 21.9 years, 179 (32%) were female, and 230 (41.1%) reported prior injection drug use. Factors associated with injection drug use in multivariate analyses included age >or= 22 years (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.18, 95% CI: 1.10-1.28); sex work involvement (AOR = 2.17, 95% CI: 1.35-3.50); non-fatal overdose (AOR = 2.10, 95% CI: 1.38-3.20); and hepatitis C (HCV) infection (AOR = 22.61, 95% CI: 7.78-65.70).
These findings highlight an alarmingly high prevalence of injection drug use among street-involved youth and demonstrate its association with an array of risks and harms, including sex work involvement, overdose, and HCV infection. These findings point to the need for a broad set of policies and interventions to prevent the initiation of injection drug use and address the risks faced by street-involved youth who are actively injecting.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19493353 View in PubMed
Less detail

Opportunities for prevention: hepatitis C prevalence and incidence in a cohort of young injection drug users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188789
Source
Hepatology. 2002 Sep;36(3):737-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Cari L Miller
Caitlin Johnston
Patricia M Spittal
Kathy Li
Nancy Laliberté
Julio S G Montaner
Martin T Schechter
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. cari@hivnet.ubc.ca
Source
Hepatology. 2002 Sep;36(3):737-42
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hepatitis C - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Prevalence
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sexual Behavior
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - virology
Abstract
The objective of this study was to compare sociodemographic, drug, and sexual risk characteristics between hepatitis C virus (HCV) baseline positive and negative young (13-24 years) injection drug users (IDUs) and to determine prospective risk factors for HCV seroconversion among the youth. Data were collected through the Vancouver Injection Drug Users Study (VIDUS). To date, more than 1,400 Vancouver-area IDUs have been enrolled and followed up; 234 were aged 24 years and younger. Semiannually, participants have completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire and have undergone serologic testing for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and HCV. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were undertaken to investigate predictors of baseline HCV positivity. In the multivariate analyses, Cox regression models with time-dependent covariates were used to identify predictors of HCV seroconversion. Of the 232 young injectors, 107 (46%) were HCV positive at baseline and a further 37 HCV seroconverted during the study period for an incidence rate of 37.3 per 100 person-years. Baseline positivity was associated with Aboriginal ancestry, older age, greater number of years injecting drugs, recent incarceration, sex trade work, more than 100 lifetime sexual partners, a previous sexually transmitted disease, living in the IDU epicenter, and injection more than once per day of heroin, cocaine, and speedball. Factors independently associated with HCV seroconversion were having a partner who uses injection drugs, requiring help to inject, and injection of cocaine more than once daily. In conclusion, unlike older IDUs, more than one half of young injectors were HCV negative at recruitment. Thus, there is a window of opportunity for prevention. However, the incidence rate of HCV among these young IDUs is alarming, suggesting that the opportunity to intervene is exceedingly small.
PubMed ID
12198668 View in PubMed
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Pathways to HIV risk and vulnerability among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered methamphetamine users: a multi-cohort gender-based analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138045
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Brandon D L Marshall
Evan Wood
Jean A Shoveller
Thomas L Patterson
Julio S G Montaner
Thomas Kerr
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St, Paul's Hospital, 608-1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:20
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Bisexuality
British Columbia
Female
HIV Infections
Homosexuality
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Methamphetamine
Minority Groups - statistics & numerical data
Models, Psychological
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders
Abstract
Methamphetamine (MA) use continues to be a major public health concern in many urban settings. We sought to assess potential relationships between MA use and individual, social, and structural HIV vulnerabilities among sexual minority (lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgendered) drug users.
Beginning in 2005 and ending in 2008, 2109 drug users were enrolled into one of three cohort studies in Vancouver, Canada. We analysed longitudinal data from all self-identified sexual minority participants (n = 248). Logistic regression using generalized estimating equations (GEE) was used to examine the independent correlates of MA use over time. All analyses were stratified by biological sex at birth.
At baseline, 104 (7.5%) males and 144 (20.4%) females reported sexual minority status, among whom 64 (62.1%) and 58 (40.3%) reported MA use in the past six months, respectively. Compared to heterosexual participants, sexual minority males (odds ratio [OR] = 3.74, p
Notes
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PubMed ID
21214930 View in PubMed
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Prevalence and correlates of jugular injections among injection drug users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156455
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2008 Jul;27(4):442-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Zia Hoda
Thomas Kerr
Kathy Li
Julio S G Montaner
Evan Wood
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2008 Jul;27(4):442-6
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cocaine-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Heroin Dependence - epidemiology
Humans
Jugular Veins
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Prostitution - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Street Drugs
Substance Abuse, Intravenous
Abstract
Jugular injection of drugs has been reported, although little is known about the prevalence of and risk factors associated with this behaviour. We evaluated factors associated with jugular injection among a cohort of injection drug users (IDU) in Vancouver, Canada.
We used univariate statistics and logistic regression to examine factors associated with jugular injection among participants in the Vancouver Injecting Drug Users Study (VIDUS), a large prospective cohort study of IDU recruited through snowball sampling methods in Vancouver, Canada.
Between December 2004 and November 2005, 780 IDU were followed up as part of VIDUS and 198 (25%) reported jugular injection in the previous 6 months. In multivariate analyses, factors associated independently with jugular injection included: being of the female gender [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.72, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.14-2.59; p = 0.010], daily heroin use (aOR = 2.89, 95% CI: 1.93-4.34; p
PubMed ID
18584397 View in PubMed
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