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78 records – page 1 of 8.

17-year follow-up of symptoms and signs in the knee joint in rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14565
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 1988;17(5):325-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
J. Isacson
E. Allander
L A Broström
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 1988;17(5):325-31
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Knee Joint - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Locomotion
Male
Middle Aged
Movement
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rheumatoid Factor - analysis
Abstract
A population survey was carried out in Stockholm, Sweden, in 1967. In a sample of 15,268 individuals, 239 were found to have rheumatoid arthritis according to the New York diagnostic criteria. In 1983, i.e. 17 years later, 109 of the 127 individuals still living were reexamined. Among these, 79 complained of knee symptoms and 30 stated that the knee was the joint that presented the greatest hindrance to walking. Fifty-nine found difficulty in walking up or down stairs and 47 had to use a walking aid. These shortcomings were more often noted in the knees that had been swollen, or painful, 17 years previously. In addition, at follow-up, narrowing of the articular space was observed in the knees that were swollen and painful. Valgus deformity was associated with swelling, while varus deformity also involved, apart from the swelling, pain and restricted motility. In all, 108 operations were performed on 48 of the 109 subjects who were re-examined; 12 of these were knee operations.
PubMed ID
3212404 View in PubMed
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Activity profile of top-class association football referees in relation to performance in selected physical tests.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163966
Source
J Sports Sci. 2007 May;25(7):805-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Javier Mallo
Enrique Navarro
José-María García-Aranda
Bart Gilis
Werner Helsen
Author Affiliation
Facultad de Ciencias de la Actividad Física y del Deporte--INEF--Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
Source
J Sports Sci. 2007 May;25(7):805-13
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Fatigue
Finland
Humans
Locomotion - physiology
Male
Physical Exertion - physiology
Physical Fitness
Soccer
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
The aims of the present study were (1) to analyse the physical demands of top-class referees and (2) to compare their official FIFA fitness test results with physical performance during a match. The work rate profiles of 11 international referees were assessed during 12 competitive matches at the 2003 FIFA Under-17 World Cup and then analysed using a bi-dimensional photogrammetric video analysis system based on direct lineal transformation (DLT) algorithms. In the first 15 min of matches, the referees were more active, performing more high-intensity exercise (P
PubMed ID
17454548 View in PubMed
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Adaptation of Circadian Neuronal Network to Photoperiod in High-Latitude European Drosophilids.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294233
Source
Curr Biol. 2017 Mar 20; 27(6):833-839
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-20-2017
Author
Pamela Menegazzi
Elena Dalla Benetta
Marta Beauchamp
Matthias Schlichting
Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter
Charlotte Helfrich-Förster
Author Affiliation
Neurobiology and Genetics, Theodor Boveri Institute, Biocentre, University of Würzburg, 97074 Würzburg, Germany.
Source
Curr Biol. 2017 Mar 20; 27(6):833-839
Date
Mar-20-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Circadian Clocks - genetics
Drosophila - genetics - physiology
Drosophila Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Finland
Locomotion
Male
Nerve Net - physiology
Photoperiod
Species Specificity
Tanzania
Abstract
The genus Drosophila contains over 2,000 species that, stemming from a common ancestor in the Old World Tropics, populate today very different environments [1, 2] (reviewed in [3]). We found significant differences in the activity pattern of Drosophila species belonging to the holarctic virilis group, i.e., D. ezoana and D. littoralis, collected in Northern Europe, compared to that of the cosmopolitan D. melanogaster, collected close to the equator. These behavioral differences might have been of adaptive significance for colonizing high-latitude habitats and hence adjust to long photoperiods. Most interestingly, the flies' locomotor activity correlates with the neurochemistry of their circadian clock network, which differs between low and high latitude for the expression pattern of the blue light photopigment cryptochrome (CRY) and the neuropeptide Pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) [4-6]. In D. melanogaster, CRY and PDF are known to modulate the timing of activity and to maintain robust rhythmicity under constant conditions [7-11]. We could partly simulate the rhythmic behavior of the high-latitude virilis group species by mimicking their CRY/PDF expression patterns in a laboratory strain of D. melanogaster. We therefore suggest that these alterations in the CRY/PDF clock neurochemistry might have allowed the virilis group species to colonize high-latitude environments.
PubMed ID
28262491 View in PubMed
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ADL-reduction and need for technical aids among 70-year-olds. From the population study of 70-year-olds in Göteborg.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8637
Source
Compr Gerontol [B]. 1988 Apr;2(1):16-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1988
Author
G. Gosman-Hedström
A. Aniansson
G B Persson
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Rehabilitation Medicine, Sahlgren's Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Compr Gerontol [B]. 1988 Apr;2(1):16-23
Date
Apr-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Exercise
Female
Home Care Services
Homemaker Services
Humans
Locomotion
Male
Movement
Muscles - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self-Help Devices
Sweden
Walkers
Abstract
Six hundred and nineteen persons from the population study of 70-year-olds "The intervention study of the elderly in Göteborg" (IVEG) were examined. They were interviewed in their home environment concerning their ability to manage activities of daily living (ADL), and the definition "ADL-reduction" is based on seven of these ADL-measurements. One third of the 70-year-old population had reduced ADL-capability, some only slightly. Joint disorders, paresis and congestive heart failure were the most common problems among the ADL-reduced subjects. Forty-three per cent of the ADL-reduced subjects (19% of total) received help with their personal care and/or housekeeping. One third had technical aid, mostly quite simple and inexpensive. Half were provided with new technical aids. The need for technical aids and home help service was noted and intervention undertaken as and when necessary. The needs were correlated to physical activity and performance in functional tests. The results do not illustrate the occurrence of handicap but are aimed at illustrating the special needs that elderly people may have in their normal surroundings.
PubMed ID
3180153 View in PubMed
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Analysis of behavioral changes in dairy cows associated with claw horn lesions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278333
Source
J Dairy Sci. 2016 Apr;99(4):2904-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
K. Nechanitzky
A. Starke
B. Vidondo
H. Müller
M. Reckardt
K. Friedli
A. Steiner
Source
J Dairy Sci. 2016 Apr;99(4):2904-14
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Behavior, Animal - physiology
Cattle
Cattle Diseases - diagnosis - psychology
Dairying - methods
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Female
Finland
Hoof and Claw - pathology
Lameness, Animal - diagnosis - psychology
Locomotion - physiology
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Detecting lame cows is important in improving animal welfare. Automated tools are potentially useful to enable identification and monitoring of lame cows. The goals of this study were to evaluate the suitability of various physiological and behavioral parameters to automatically detect lameness in dairy cows housed in a cubicle barn. Lame cows suffering from a claw horn lesion (sole ulcer or white line disease) of one claw of the same hind limb (n=32; group L) and 10 nonlame healthy cows (group C) were included in this study. Lying and standing behavior at night by tridimensional accelerometers, weight distribution between hind limbs by the 4-scale weighing platform, feeding behavior at night by the nose band sensor, and heart activity by the Polar device (Polar Electro Oy, Kempele, Finland) were assessed. Either the entire data set or parts of the data collected over a 48-h period were used for statistical analysis, depending upon the parameter in question. The standing time at night over 12 h and the limb weight ratio (LWR) were significantly higher in group C as compared with group L, whereas the lying time at night over 12 h, the mean limb difference (?weight), and the standard deviation (SD) of the weight applied on the limb taking less weight were significantly lower in group C as compared with group L. No significant difference was noted between the groups for the parameters of heart activity and feeding behavior at night. The locomotion score of cows in group L was positively correlated with the lying time and ?weight, whereas it was negatively correlated with LWR and SD. The highest sensitivity (0.97) for lameness detection was found for the parameter SD [specificity of 0.80 and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.84]. The highest specificity (0.90) for lameness detection was present for ?weight (sensitivity=0.78; AUC=0.88) and LWR (sensitivity=0.81; AUC=0.87). The model considering the data of SD together with lying time at night was the best predictor of cows being lame, accounting for 40% of the variation in the likelihood of a cow being lame (sensitivity=0.94; specificity=0.80; AUC=0.86). In conclusion, the data derived from the 4-scale-weighing platform, either alone or combined with the lying time at night over 12 h, represent the most valuable parameters for automated identification of lame cows suffering from a claw horn lesion of one individual hind limb.
PubMed ID
26874422 View in PubMed
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Assistive devices in an elderly population studied at 70 and 76 years of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218492
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 1994 Apr-Jun;16(2):85-92
Publication Type
Article
Author
U. Sonn
G. Grimby
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Vasa Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 1994 Apr-Jun;16(2):85-92
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Female
Housing
Humans
Life Style
Locomotion
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Self-Help Devices
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
The longitudinal Intervention Study of the Elderly in Göteborg, Sweden (IVEG), has provided an opportunity to report on the use of assistive devices in activities of daily living (ADL) in a subsample of elderly persons living in their own homes, who were interviewed at the ages of 70 and 76 (n = 371). Type, frequency, usage rate and effectiveness of assistive devices was studied among all 76-year-olds involved in the IVEG study (n = 595). One-fifth at the age of 70 and almost half of the population at 76 had assistive devices, most frequently in connection with bathing and mobility. A higher percentage of females and subjects living alone used assistive devices compared to men and cohabitants. The longitudinal study showed that 31% developed a need for assistive devices between 70 and 76 years of age, 15% used assistive devices both at 70 and 76 years, while 50% had no devices at 70 or at 76 years of age. The usage rate was high (90%), and a high degree of effectiveness was found, particularly in the form of an increment in safety and a decrement in effort in the various activities.
PubMed ID
8043889 View in PubMed
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[Basic vital functions in patients admitted as emergencies to a general medicine department].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247106
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1979 Jun 11;141(24):1665-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-11-1979

[Basic vital functions in patients admitted as emergencies to an internal medicine ward].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247105
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1979 Jun 11;141(24):1668-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-11-1979
Source
Acta Morphol Neerl Scand. 1975 Nov;13(3):145-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1975
Author
A E Ljunggren
Source
Acta Morphol Neerl Scand. 1975 Nov;13(3):145-70
Date
Nov-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Biomechanical Phenomena
Biometry - methods
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Locomotion
Male
Norway
Sex Factors
Tibia - anatomy & histology
Abstract
In all, 56 tibiae from Lapps and 56 tibiae from Norwegians have been studied. These ethnic groups represent different weight bearing situations. Only measurements referring to the diaphysis are presented. The bones are studied in the AP and ML planes and at different transverse sections. The material is analyzed statistically. The distribution form is examined. Chiefly positive skewness occurs. Platykurtosis is found twice as often as leptokurtosis. A differentiated pattern of distribution seems to be the case regarding measurements in the lower extremities. This corresponds to the influence of variable hereditary and external factors. Divergencies from standard normal distribution is compared with differences between groups. In some cases differences are influenced by platykurtosis and skewness. Divergence from standard normal distribution could not be traced back to measuring errors, special features of the bone or special sex characteristics. The divergencies are not supposed to affect the results to any noteworthy extent. Female Lapps show small variances, female Norwegians great variances. In linear variables Lapps generally show smaller values than Norwegians, females smaller values than males. Regarding linear measurements, sex differences are a little more marked than differences between the two ethnic groups. The opposite is the case regarding the angular measurements and the indices. The sex differences in linear measurements are smaller in Lapps than in Norwegians. The opposite is the case regarding the length of the bone. In Lapps, angular measurements and indices show no significant sex differences. Regarding linear measurements, differences between the ethnic groups are mostly due to differences between the males. The opposite may be said about the indicnes. The variations of the tibia recorded and discussed in the present paper are the results of mechanical factors influencing the basic processes in functional bone remodelling. The periosteal ossification is particularly involved in the dimensions of the shaft, the epiphyseal cartilage in the length dimensions. Particularly important is the relation between the weight bearing line and the diaphysial axis of the bone, and the muscles activated by variation is this relation.
PubMed ID
1211223 View in PubMed
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Body fat and mobility are explained by common genetic and environmental influences in older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157662
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Jul;16(7):1616-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Alfredo Ortega-Alonso
Sarianna Sipilä
Urho M Kujala
Jaakko Kaprio
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. alfredo.ortega@sport.jyu.fi
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Jul;16(7):1616-21
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adiposity - genetics
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - genetics
Electric Impedance
Environment
Female
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Locomotion - genetics
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Models, Genetic
Obesity - genetics - physiopathology
Physical Endurance - genetics
Risk factors
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics
Walking
Abstract
In older adults, mobility limitations often coexist with overweight or obesity, suggesting that similar factors may underlie both traits. This study examined the extent to which genetic and environmental influences explain the association between adiposity and mobility in older women. Body fat percentage (bioimpedance test), walking speed over 10 m, and distance walked in a 6-min test were evaluated in 92 monozygotic (MZ) and 104 dizygotic (DZ) pairs of twin sisters reared together, aged 63-76 years. Genetic and environmental influences on each trait were estimated using age-adjusted multivariate genetic modeling. The analyses showed that the means (and s.d.) for body fat percentage, walking speed, and walking endurance were 33.2+/-7.3%, 1.7+/-0.3 m/s and 529.7+/-75.4 m, respectively. The phenotypic correlation between adiposity and walking speed was -0.32 and between adiposity and endurance it was -0.33. Genetic influences explained 80% of the association between adiposity and speed, and 65% of adiposity and walking endurance. Cross-trait genetic influences accounted for 12% of the variability in adiposity, 56% in walking speed, and 34% in endurance. Trait-specific genetic influences were also detected for adiposity (54%) and walking endurance (13%), but not speed. In conclusion, among community-living older women, an inverse association was found between adiposity and mobility that was mostly due to the effect of shared genes. This result suggests that the identification of genetic variants for body fat metabolism may also provide understanding of the development of mobility limitations in older women.
PubMed ID
18421266 View in PubMed
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78 records – page 1 of 8.