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Abdominal malignancies in patients with Wilson's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18250
Source
QJM. 2003 Sep;96(9):657-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
J M Walshe
E. Waldenström
V. Sams
H. Nordlinder
K. Westermark
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, The Middlesex Hospital, London, UK. penicillamine@waitrose.com
Source
QJM. 2003 Sep;96(9):657-62
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Adenocarcinoma - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Biliary Tract Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Child
Cholangiocarcinoma - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Hepatolenticular Degeneration - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Incidence
Liver Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Long-Term Care
Male
Mutation
Pancreatic Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Wilson's disease is associated with heavy copper overload, primarily in the liver. Copper is a toxic metal, and might be expected to be associated with cancer induction, as iron is in haemochromatosis. However, liver cancer is currently believed to be extremely rare in this disease, and other intra-abdominal malignancies have not been reported. AIM: To assess the frequency of abdominal malignant disease in patients with Wilson's disease on long-term follow-up. DESIGN: Retrospective study in two specialist Wilson's disease clinics: Cambridge/London and Uppsala. METHODS: We reviewed the case records of 363 patients seen at three centres: Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, 1955-1987; the Middlesex Hospital, London, 1987-2000; and the University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden, 1966-2002. Patients were grouped by length of follow-up: 10-19 years; 20-29 years; 30-39 years; and 40 years or more. RESULTS: No cancers were seen in patients followed for
PubMed ID
12925721 View in PubMed
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Acquired aplastic anaemia in seven children with severe hepatitis with or without liver failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87545
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2007 Nov;96(11):1660-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Honkaniemi Emma
Gustafsson Britt
Fischler Björn
Nemeth Antal
Frost Britt-Marie
Papadogiannakis Nikos
Winiarski Jacek
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Clintec, Karolinska Institutet, S-141 86 Stockholm, Sweden. emma.honkaniemi@karolinska.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2007 Nov;96(11):1660-4
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anemia, Aplastic - etiology - therapy
Biopsy
Bone Marrow Cells - pathology
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Hepatitis - complications - pathology - physiopathology
Humans
Liver - pathology
Liver Failure - etiology
Male
Medical Records
Parvovirus - pathogenicity
Retrospective Studies
Serologic Tests
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
AIM: Aplastic anaemia following hepatitis may develop in as many as 1 of 3 patients with non-A, non-B and non-C hepatitis. Several causative factors have been discussed, such as viral infections and autoimmunity. Here we describe the natural history of this condition in 7 children and investigate possible hepatitis-causing agents. METHODS: We reviewed the medical records, bone marrow and liver biopsies of 7 children with severe hepatitis, with or without liver failure, who subsequently had developed aplastic anaemia. RESULTS: The median time from onset of hepatic symptoms until diagnosed onset of aplasia was 54 days. No associated viral infections could be identified. On liver biopsy, a majority had lobular inflammation but lacked signs of autoimmune hepatitis, findings compatible with a viral aetiology. Three of 6 children had low reticulocyte counts already at onset of hepatitis. All, but one patient is alive at median follow-up of 8 years. CONCLUSION: The unknown pathogenetic mechanism appears to target liver and bone marrow simultaneously, because half of the children concomitantly had low reticulocyte counts and severe liver failure.
PubMed ID
17888058 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122648
Source
World J Gastroenterol. 2012 Jun 28;18(24):3105-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-28-2012
Author
Hannes Hagström
Per Stål
Knut Stokkeland
Annika Bergquist
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, 14186 Stockholm, Sweden. hannes.hagstrom@ki.se
Source
World J Gastroenterol. 2012 Jun 28;18(24):3105-11
Date
Jun-28-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Binge Drinking - epidemiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Cholangitis, Sclerosing - diagnosis - epidemiology
Disease Progression
Elasticity Imaging Techniques
Female
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess the alcohol drinking patterns in a cohort of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) patients and the possible influence on the development of fibrosis.
Ninety-six patients with PSC were evaluated with a validated questionnaire about a patient's lifetime drinking habits: the lifetime drinking history (LDH) questionnaire. In addition, clinical status, transient elastography and biochemistry values were analysed and registered. Patients were defined as having either significant or non-significant fibrosis. Significant fibrosis was defined as either an elastography value of = 17.3 kPa or the presence of clinical signs of cirrhosis. Patients were divided into two groups depending on their alcohol consumption patterns; no/low alcohol consumption (one drink or unit/d) and moderate/high alcohol consumption (= 1 drink or unit/d). LDH data were calculated to estimate lifetime alcohol intake (LAI), current alcohol intake, drinks per year before and after diagnosis of PSC. We also calculated the number of episodes of binge-drinking (defined as consuming = 5 drinks per occasion) in total, before and after the diagnosis of PSC.
The mean LAI was 3882 units of alcohol, giving a mean intake after onset of alcohol consumption of 2.6 units per week. Only 9% of patients consumed alcohol equal to or more than one unit per day. Current alcohol intake in patients with significant fibrosis (n = 26) was less than in patients without significant fibrosis (n = 70), as shown by lower values of phosphatidylethanol (B-PEth) (0.1 ?mol/L vs 0.33 ?mol/L, respectively, P = 0.002) and carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) (0.88% vs 1.06%, respectively, P = 0.02). Self-reported LAI was similar between the two groups. Patients with significant fibrosis reduced their alcohol intake after diagnosis from 103 to 88 units per year whereas patients without fibrosis increased their alcohol intake after PSC diagnosis from 111 to 151 units/year. There were no correlations between elastography values and intake of alcohol (units/year) (r = -0.036).
PSC patients have low alcohol consumption. The lack of correlation between fibrosis and alcohol intake indicates that a low alcohol intake is safe in these patients.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22791946 View in PubMed
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Alcohol drinking pattern and risk of alcoholic liver cirrhosis: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269609
Source
J Hepatol. 2015 May;62(5):1061-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Gro Askgaard
Morten Grønbæk
Mette S Kjær
Anne Tjønneland
Janne S Tolstrup
Source
J Hepatol. 2015 May;62(5):1061-7
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects - classification
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Abstract
Alcohol is the main contributing factor of alcoholic cirrhosis, but less is known about the significance of drinking pattern.
We investigated the risk of alcoholic cirrhosis among 55,917 participants (aged 50-64 years) in the Danish Cancer, Diet, and Health study (1993-2011). Baseline information on alcohol intake, drinking pattern, and confounders was obtained from a questionnaire. Follow-up information came from national registers. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) for alcoholic cirrhosis in relation to drinking frequency, lifetime alcohol amount, and beverage type.
We observed 257 and 85 incident cases of alcoholic cirrhosis among men and women, respectively, none among lifetime abstainers. In men, HR for alcoholic cirrhosis among daily drinkers was 3.65 (95% CI: 2.39; 5.55) compared to drinking 2-4 days/week. Alcohol amount in recent age periods (40-49 and 50-59 years) was associated with an increased risk, whereas the amount in 20-29 and 30-39 years was not. In men drinking 14-28 drinks/week, HR was 7.47 (95% CI: 1.68; 33.12), 3.12 (95% CI: 1.53; 6.39), and 1.69 (95% CI: 0.79; 3.65) in drinkers of little (
Notes
Comment In: J Hepatol. 2015 May;62(5):1000-125646887
PubMed ID
25634330 View in PubMed
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Alcohol-related hospital utilization and mortality in different occupations in Sweden in 1991-1995.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10061
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2001 Dec;27(6):412-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
T. Hemmingsson
G. Ringbäck Weitoft
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational Health, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. tomas.hemmingsson@smd.sll.se
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2001 Dec;27(6):412-9
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - epidemiology - mortality
Comparative Study
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations
Risk
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study investigated alcohol-related hospital utilization and alcohol-related mortality according to occupation among men and women. Whether increased rates of alcoholism in some occupations result from circumstances within the occupation or from selective recruitment of persons prone to alcohol misuse was studied. METHODS: All Swedish residents were included who reported an occupation in the censuses of 1985 and 1990 and were born in 1926-1960. The relationships between occupation and hospitalization due to an alcoholism diagnosis in 1991-1994 and alcohol-related mortality in 1991-1995 were studied among stable workers (those who held the same occupation in both censuses) and newly recruited workers (those who held different occupations in the two censuses). Incidence and mortality rates were calculated for the different occupations using the person-year method, and standardized rate ratios were used as approximations of the relative risk of disease occurrence and mortality in different occupations as compared with the corresponding statistics of the entire study population. RESULTS: Several, mostly manual, occupations showed an increased relative risk of alcoholism diagnoses and alcohol-related mortality. Nonmanual occupations had low risks. Women in male-dominated high-risk occupations often showed increased relative risks. Stable and newly recruited employees in the same occupation showed very similar relative risks. CONCLUSIONS: New recruits into high-risk occupations often have increased relative risks of at least the same magnitude as persons employed long-term in the same occupations. This finding indicates that the increased relative risk of alcoholism found in some occupations can partly be explained by selective recruitment of heavy drinkers.
PubMed ID
11800329 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of mortality in benign diseases of the organs of the hepato-pancreato-biliary region and the ways of its reduction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73537
Source
Klin Khir. 1992;(1):41-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
O E Bobrov
V A Goloviashkin
M V Shelemba
N N Rozenberg
M T Achilov
Source
Klin Khir. 1992;(1):41-3
Date
1992
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Biliary Tract Diseases - diagnosis - mortality - surgery
Chronic Disease
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Liver Diseases - diagnosis - mortality - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatic Diseases - diagnosis - mortality - surgery
Postoperative Complications - etiology - mortality
Quality of Health Care
Time Factors
Ukraine
Abstract
The case records and autopsy protocols of 34 patients, who died from benign diseases of the hepato-pancreato-biliary organs have been analysed. It is concluded that of main importance in the ++thanatogenesis are the following factors: shortcomings in the system of prophylactic medical examination, diagnostic and tactical errors made at prehospital stage of treatment and in a hospital, high incidence of concomitant diseases, late admission to a hospital, elderly and senile age of the majority of patients. A question about importance of the main and competitive causes of death is discussed.
PubMed ID
1564867 View in PubMed
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Analysis of survival predictors in a prospective cohort of patients undergoing transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma in a single Canadian centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127146
Source
HPB (Oxford). 2012 Mar;14(3):162-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Karim M Eltawil
Robert Berry
Mohamed Abdolell
Michele Molinari
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Center, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada.
Source
HPB (Oxford). 2012 Mar;14(3):162-70
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - blood - mortality - pathology - therapy
Chemoembolization, Therapeutic - adverse effects - mortality
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Liver Neoplasms - blood - mortality - pathology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasm Staging
Nova Scotia
Palliative Care
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Tumor Burden
alpha-Fetoproteins - metabolism
Abstract
Despite advances in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a great proportion of patients are eligible only for palliative therapy for reasons of advanced-stage disease or poor hepatic reserve. The use of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) in the palliation of non-resectable HCC has shown a survival benefit in European and Asian populations. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of TACE by analysing overall 5-year survival, interval changes of tumour size and serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels in a prospective North American cohort.
From September 2005 to December 2010, 46 candidates for TACE were enrolled in the study. Collectively, they underwent 102 TACE treatments. Data on tumour response, serum AFP and survival were prospectively collected.
In compensated cirrhotic patients, serial treatment with TACE had a stabilizing effect on tumour size and reduced serum AFP levels during the first 12 months. Overall survival rates at 1, 2 and 3 years were 69%, 58% and 20%, respectively. Younger individuals and patients with a lower body mass index, affected by early-stage HCC with involvement of a single lobe, had better survival in univariate analysis. After adjustment for risk factors, early tumour stage (T1 and T2 vs. T3 and T4) at diagnosis was the only statistically significant predictor for survival.
In compensated cirrhotic patients, TACE is an effective palliative intervention and HCC stage at diagnosis seems to be the most important predictor of longterm outcomes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22321034 View in PubMed
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288 records – page 1 of 29.