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Acute hepatic porphyria and cancer risk: a nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285629
Source
J Intern Med. 2017 Sep;282(3):229-240
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
C M Baravelli
S. Sandberg
A K Aarsand
R M Nilsen
M C Tollånes
Source
J Intern Med. 2017 Sep;282(3):229-240
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Endometrial Neoplasms - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Porphobilinogen Synthase - deficiency
Porphyrias, Hepatic - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Acute hepatic porphyria (AHP) is considered to be a risk factor for primary liver cancer (PLC), but varying risk estimates have been published.
Our aim was to investigate the risk of PLC and other cancers in persons with AHP using a nationwide cohort design. Given that greater numbers of women than men tend to have manifest and more severe AHP, a further aim was to investigate sex differences in this risk.
The study sample consisted of all Norwegian residents aged 18 years or older during the period 2000-2011. Persons with AHP (n = 251) were identified through the Norwegian Porphyria Centre, and patients with a cancer diagnosis were identified by linkage to the Cancer Registry of Norway.
For persons with AHP, the annual incidence rate of PLC was 0.35%. PLC risk was substantially higher for individuals with an AHP diagnosis compared to the reference population [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 108, 95% confidence interval (CI) 56-207]. In a meta-analysis of published studies on PLC and AHP, including ours, women had a higher risk than men. In addition, our results suggested that persons with AHP may have increased risks of kidney (aHR 7.4, 95% CI 2.4-23.1) and endometrial cancers (aHR 6.2, 95% CI 2.0-19.3).
Our findings confirmed a substantially higher risk of PLC associated with AHP compared to the general population. In a meta-analysis, the risk was shown to be greater for women than men. The novel findings of a moderate to substantial association between AHP and kidney and endometrial cancers should be investigated further.
PubMed ID
28730628 View in PubMed
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Acute liver failure in children: the first 348 patients in the pediatric acute liver failure study group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169060
Source
J Pediatr. 2006 May;148(5):652-658
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Robert H Squires
Benjamin L Shneider
John Bucuvalas
Estella Alonso
Ronald J Sokol
Michael R Narkewicz
Anil Dhawan
Philip Rosenthal
Norberto Rodriguez-Baez
Karen F Murray
Simon Horslen
Martin G Martin
M James Lopez
Humberto Soriano
Brendan M McGuire
Maureen M Jonas
Nada Yazigi
Ross W Shepherd
Kathleen Schwarz
Steven Lobritto
Daniel W Thomas
Joel E Lavine
Saul Karpen
Vicky Ng
Deirdre Kelly
Nancy Simonds
Linda S Hynan
Author Affiliation
University of Pittsburgh, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA. Robert.squires@chp.edu
Source
J Pediatr. 2006 May;148(5):652-658
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual
Female
Great Britain
Health status
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Liver Failure, Acute - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Liver Transplantation
Male
Needs Assessment
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
To determine short-term outcome for children with acute liver failure (ALF) as it relates to cause, clinical status, and patient demographics and to determine prognostic factors.
A prospective, multicenter case study collecting demographic, clinical, laboratory, and short-term outcome data on children from birth to 18 years with ALF. Patients without encephalopathy were included if the prothrombin time and international normalized ratio remained > or = 20 seconds and/or >2, respectively, despite vitamin K. Primary outcome measures 3 weeks after study entry were death, death after transplantation, alive with native liver, and alive with transplanted organ.
The cause of ALF in 348 children included acute acetaminophen toxicity (14%), metabolic disease (10%), autoimmune liver disease (6%), non-acetaminophen drug-related hepatotoxicity (5%), infections (6%), other diagnosed conditions (10%); 49% were indeterminate. Outcome varied between patient sub-groups; 20% with non-acetaminophen ALF died or underwent liver transplantation and never had clinical encephalopathy.
Causes of ALF in children differ from in adults. Clinical encephalopathy may not be present in children. The high percentage of indeterminate cases provides an opportunity for investigation.
Notes
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Cites: Hepatology. 1997 Mar;25(3):541-79049195
Cites: J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1997 Feb;24(2):128-349106097
Cites: Pediatr Neurol. 1997 May;16(4):337-439258971
Cites: J Pediatr. 1998 Jan;132(1):22-79469995
Cites: Hepatology. 1998 Apr;27(4):1050-59537445
Cites: Pediatr Neurol. 1998 Mar;18(3):251-29568923
Cites: Dig Dis Sci. 1998 Jun;43(6):1311-69635624
PubMed ID
16737880 View in PubMed
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Adverse outcomes of pregnancy in women with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277352
Source
Liver Int. 2016 Feb;36(2):268-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Hannes Hagström
Jonas Höijer
Jonas F Ludvigsson
Matteo Bottai
Anders Ekbom
Rolf Hultcrantz
Olof Stephansson
Knut Stokkeland
Source
Liver Int. 2016 Feb;36(2):268-74
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Diabetes, Gestational - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease - complications - epidemiology
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Premature Birth - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is considered the most common liver disease in the world, but little is known about its potential association with pregnancy outcomes. We aimed to investigate pregnancy outcomes in NAFLD.
The Swedish Medical Birth Register (MBR) was used to identify births between 1992 and 2011 (N = 1 960 416). By linkage with the National Patient Register, we identified women with a diagnosis of NAFLD. The MBR was then used to identify outcomes: gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia, Caesarean section, Apgar score
PubMed ID
26114995 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and health: what is good for the French may not be for the Russians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201592
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1998 Dec;52(12):766-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
W. Zatonski
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1998 Dec;52(12):766-7
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - mortality - trends
Cohort Studies
Europe, Eastern - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
France - epidemiology
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality
Notes
Comment On: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1998 Dec;52(12):772-410396517
PubMed ID
10396514 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and liver injury: dose-related or permissive effect?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12327
Source
Br J Addict. 1989 Jun;84(6):581-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1989
Author
T I Sørensen
Source
Br J Addict. 1989 Jun;84(6):581-9
Date
Jun-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Alcoholism - mortality
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - mortality
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
The studies addressing the risk of development of cirrhosis of the liver in relation to alcohol consumption have been based on comparisons at the aggregate population level and at the individual level, on case-control studies and cohort studies, and on retrospective and prospective assessment of alcohol consumption. The ideal, but unfeasible, study design for estimation of the risk function is a prospective monitoring of alcohol consumption and recording of rate of development of cirrhosis per unit of time. Two recent studies, approaching this design, suggested that above a rather low, but not precisely determined, level of alcohol consumption, the risk of development of cirrhosis is not further influenced by the amount of alcohol consumed. A critical analysis of previous studies suggests that this risk function actually is compatible with their findings. The contention that alcohol abuse has a permissive rather than a dose-dependent role in the development of alcoholic liver injury encourages research into the additional factors that must act before the liver injury occurs.
PubMed ID
2665882 View in PubMed
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Alcohol drinking pattern and risk of alcoholic liver cirrhosis: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269609
Source
J Hepatol. 2015 May;62(5):1061-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Gro Askgaard
Morten Grønbæk
Mette S Kjær
Anne Tjønneland
Janne S Tolstrup
Source
J Hepatol. 2015 May;62(5):1061-7
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects - classification
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Abstract
Alcohol is the main contributing factor of alcoholic cirrhosis, but less is known about the significance of drinking pattern.
We investigated the risk of alcoholic cirrhosis among 55,917 participants (aged 50-64 years) in the Danish Cancer, Diet, and Health study (1993-2011). Baseline information on alcohol intake, drinking pattern, and confounders was obtained from a questionnaire. Follow-up information came from national registers. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) for alcoholic cirrhosis in relation to drinking frequency, lifetime alcohol amount, and beverage type.
We observed 257 and 85 incident cases of alcoholic cirrhosis among men and women, respectively, none among lifetime abstainers. In men, HR for alcoholic cirrhosis among daily drinkers was 3.65 (95% CI: 2.39; 5.55) compared to drinking 2-4 days/week. Alcohol amount in recent age periods (40-49 and 50-59 years) was associated with an increased risk, whereas the amount in 20-29 and 30-39 years was not. In men drinking 14-28 drinks/week, HR was 7.47 (95% CI: 1.68; 33.12), 3.12 (95% CI: 1.53; 6.39), and 1.69 (95% CI: 0.79; 3.65) in drinkers of little (
Notes
Comment In: J Hepatol. 2015 May;62(5):1000-125646887
PubMed ID
25634330 View in PubMed
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Alcoholic Cirrhosis Increases Risk for Autoimmune Diseases: A Nationwide Registry-Based Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274866
Source
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2015 Nov;13(11):2017-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Lisbet Grønbæk
Hendrik Vilstrup
Bent Deleuran
Reiner Wiest
Aleksander Krag
Peter Jepsen
Source
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2015 Nov;13(11):2017-22
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Autoimmune Diseases - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Incidence
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Risk assessment
Abstract
Alcoholic cirrhosis is associated with hyperactivation and dysregulation of the immune system. In addition to its ability to increase risk for infections, it also may increase the risk for autoimmune diseases. We studied the incidence of autoimmune diseases among patients with alcoholic cirrhosis vs controls in Denmark.
We collected data from nationwide health care registries to identify and follow up all citizens of Denmark diagnosed with alcoholic cirrhosis from 1977 through 2010. Each patient was matched with 5 random individuals from the population (controls) of the same sex and age. The incidence rates of various autoimmune diseases were compared between patients with cirrhosis and controls and adjusted for the number of hospitalizations in the previous year (a marker for the frequency of clinical examination).
Of the 24,679 patients diagnosed with alcoholic cirrhosis, 532 developed an autoimmune disease, yielding an overall increased adjusted incidence rate ratio (aIRR) of 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-1.50). The strongest associations were with Addison's disease (aIRR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.04-5.85), inflammatory bowel disease (aIRR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.26-1.92), celiac disease (aIRR, 5.12; 95% CI, 2.58-10.16), pernicious anemia (aIRR, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.50-3.68), and psoriasis (aIRR, 4.06; 95% CI, 3.32-4.97). There was no increase in the incidence rate for rheumatoid arthritis (aIRR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.69-1.15); the incidence rate for polymyalgia rheumatica decreased in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis compared with controls (aIRR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.33-0.67).
Based on a nationwide cohort study of patients in Denmark, alcoholic cirrhosis is a risk factor for several autoimmune diseases.
PubMed ID
26044312 View in PubMed
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Alcoholism and cancer risk: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24357
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1992 Sep;3(5):419-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1992
Author
H O Adami
J K McLaughlin
A W Hsing
A. Wolk
A. Ekbom
L. Holmberg
I. Persson
Author Affiliation
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1992 Sep;3(5):419-25
Date
Sep-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Laryngeal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The incidence of cancer was studied in a population-based cohort of 9,353 individuals (8,340 men and 1,013 women) with a discharge diagnosis of alcoholism in 1965-83, followed up for 19 years (mean 7.7). After exclusion of cancers in the first year of follow-up, 491 cancers were observed cf 343.2 expected through 1984 (standardized incidence ratio [SIR] = 1.4, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] = 1.3-1.6). A similar excess risk of cancer was seen among men (SIR = 1.4, CI = 1.3-1.6) and among women (SIR = 1.5, CI = 1.1-2.0). We observed the established associations with cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx (SIR = 4.1, CI = 2.9-5.7), esophagus (SIR = 6.8, CI = 4.5-9.9), larynx (SIR = 3.3, CI = 1.7-6.0), and lung (SIR = 2.1, CI = 1.7-2.6), although confounding by smoking likely increased these risk estimates. While there was evidence of increased risk for pancreatic cancer (SIR = 1.5, CI = 0.9-2.3), alcoholism did not elevate the incidence of cancer of the stomach (SIR = 0.9, CI = 6-1.4), large bowel (SIR = 1.1, CI = 0.8-1.5), prostate (SIR = 1.0, CI = 0.8-1.3), urinary bladder (SIR = 1.0, CI = 0.6-1.5), or of malignant melanoma (SIR = 0.9, CI = 0.3-1.9). Among women, the number of breast cancers observed was close to expected (SIR = 1.2, CI = 0.6-2.2), although a significant excess number of cervical cancers occurred (SIR = 4.2, CI = 1.5-9.1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1525322 View in PubMed
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Alcoholism and liver cirrhosis in the etiology of primary liver cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11847
Source
Int J Cancer. 1992 Jul 30;51(6):898-902
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-30-1992
Author
H O Adami
A W Hsing
J K McLaughlin
D. Trichopoulos
D. Hacker
A. Ekbom
I. Persson
Author Affiliation
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Int J Cancer. 1992 Jul 30;51(6):898-902
Date
Jul-30-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Liver Cirrhosis - complications - epidemiology
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - complications - epidemiology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine the risk of developing primary liver cancer in patients with a diagnosis of alcoholism, liver cirrhosis, or both. Three population-based, mutually exclusive cohorts were defined on the basis of hospital discharge diagnosis between 1965 and 1983. Complete follow-up through 1984--excluding the first year of follow-up--showed that among 8,517 patients with a diagnosis of alcoholism, 13 cancers occurred, vs. 4.2 expected (standardized incidence ratio (SIR) = 3.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.6 to 5.3); among 3,589 patients with liver cirrhosis, 59 cancers occurred, vs. 1.7 expected (SIR = 35.1; 95% CI = 26.7 to 45.3), and among 836 patients with both diagnoses, 11 cancers occurred, vs. 0.3 expected (SIR = 34.3; 95% CI = 17.1 to 61.3). Thus, alcoholism alone entailed a moderately increased risk and alcoholism with liver cirrhosis did not increase the high relative risk for liver cancer more than cirrhosis alone. We conclude that alcohol intake may be a liver carcinogen only by being causally involved in the development of cirrhosis; and further, that the risk of developing liver cancer following cirrhosis in this population is similar to or higher than that after chronic hepatitis-B-virus infection in other Western countries.
PubMed ID
1639537 View in PubMed
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Alcoholism in social classes and occupations in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11036
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1997 Jun;26(3):584-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
T. Hemmingsson
I. Lundberg
A. Romelsjö
L. Alfredsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Health, NVSO, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1997 Jun;26(3):584-91
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Databases, Factual
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - epidemiology
Male
Military Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Occupations - classification - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Twins - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A number of studies have shown variations in the occurrence of alcoholism between different socioeconomic groups and occupations, but it has not been clear to what extent this is related to the average alcohol consumption in the same socioeconomic groups or occupations. METHODS: The relationship between socioeconomic group and occupation and hospital discharge 1981-1983 due to 'diagnoses related to alcoholism' (AD) (alcohol psychosis, alcoholism, and alcohol intoxication) and liver cirrhosis was studied in a cohort of 375,035 men and 140,139 women in 13 counties in Sweden who had reported the same occupation in the censuses of 1960 and 1970. Data on alcohol consumption in different socioeconomic groups and occupations were collected from a conscription investigation and from the Swedish twin registry with data from 1969/70 and 1973 respectively. RESULTS: Intermediate or higher non-manual employees had lower risk of AD as well as of liver cirrhosis compared to manual workers for both sexes. Among males several, mostly blue-collar, occupations had increased relative risks of AD. A high level of association was found between the relative risks of AD and liver cirrhosis in socioeconomic groups, and the relative risk of AD in occupations, and the average alcohol consumption in the same socioeconomic groups/occupations among males. Such an association was not evident among women. CONCLUSION: The study shows, contrary to previous Swedish evidence, that there is a strong relationship between the incidence of alcoholism in socioeconomic groups and occupations and the average alcohol consumption in these groups among men.
PubMed ID
9222784 View in PubMed
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209 records – page 1 of 21.