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1H-MRS Measured Ectopic Fat in Liver and Muscle in Danish Lean and Obese Children and Adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273208
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Cilius Esmann Fonvig
Elizaveta Chabanova
Ehm Astrid Andersson
Johanne Dam Ohrt
Oluf Pedersen
Torben Hansen
Henrik S Thomsen
Jens-Christian Holm
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - physiopathology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dyslipidemias - blood
Fatty Liver - pathology
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Intra-Abdominal Fat - pathology
Linear Models
Lipids - blood
Liver - metabolism - pathology
Male
Muscles - pathology
Overweight
Pediatric Obesity - blood - pathology
Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Puberty
Sex Factors
Subcutaneous Fat - pathology
Abstract
This cross sectional study aims to investigate the associations between ectopic lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle and biochemical measures, estimates of insulin resistance, anthropometry, and blood pressure in lean and overweight/obese children.
Fasting plasma glucose, serum lipids, serum insulin, and expressions of insulin resistance, anthropometry, blood pressure, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of liver and muscle fat were obtained in 327 Danish children and adolescents aged 8-18 years.
In 287 overweight/obese children, the prevalences of hepatic and muscular steatosis were 31% and 68%, respectively, whereas the prevalences in 40 lean children were 3% and 10%, respectively. A multiple regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index z-score (BMI SDS), and pubertal development showed that the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 4.2 (95%CI: [1.8; 10.2], p = 0.0009) when hepatic steatosis was present. Comparing the simultaneous presence of hepatic and muscular steatosis with no presence of steatosis, the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 5.8 (95%CI: [2.0; 18.6], p = 0.002). No significant associations between muscle fat and dyslipidemia, impaired fasting glucose, or blood pressure were observed. Liver and muscle fat, adjusted for age, sex, BMI SDS, and pubertal development, associated to BMI SDS and glycosylated hemoglobin, while only liver fat associated to visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue and intramyocellular lipid associated inversely to high density lipoprotein cholesterol.
Hepatic steatosis is associated with dyslipidemia and liver and muscle fat depositions are linked to obesity-related metabolic dysfunctions, especially glycosylated hemoglobin, in children and adolescents, which suggest an increased cardiovascular disease risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26252778 View in PubMed
Less detail

210Pb and 210Po in tissues of some Alaskan residents as related to consumption of caribou or reindeer meat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5061
Source
Health Physics. 1970 Feb;18(2):127-134
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1970

Abdominal malignancies in patients with Wilson's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18250
Source
QJM. 2003 Sep;96(9):657-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
J M Walshe
E. Waldenström
V. Sams
H. Nordlinder
K. Westermark
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, The Middlesex Hospital, London, UK. penicillamine@waitrose.com
Source
QJM. 2003 Sep;96(9):657-62
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Adenocarcinoma - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Biliary Tract Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Child
Cholangiocarcinoma - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Hepatolenticular Degeneration - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Incidence
Liver Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Long-Term Care
Male
Mutation
Pancreatic Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Wilson's disease is associated with heavy copper overload, primarily in the liver. Copper is a toxic metal, and might be expected to be associated with cancer induction, as iron is in haemochromatosis. However, liver cancer is currently believed to be extremely rare in this disease, and other intra-abdominal malignancies have not been reported. AIM: To assess the frequency of abdominal malignant disease in patients with Wilson's disease on long-term follow-up. DESIGN: Retrospective study in two specialist Wilson's disease clinics: Cambridge/London and Uppsala. METHODS: We reviewed the case records of 363 patients seen at three centres: Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, 1955-1987; the Middlesex Hospital, London, 1987-2000; and the University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden, 1966-2002. Patients were grouped by length of follow-up: 10-19 years; 20-29 years; 30-39 years; and 40 years or more. RESULTS: No cancers were seen in patients followed for
PubMed ID
12925721 View in PubMed
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Abdominal trauma during thirty years: analysis of a large case series.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40679
Source
Injury. 1981 Sep;13(2):93-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1981
Author
D. Bergqvist
H. Hedelin
G. Karlsson
B. Lindblad
T. Mätzsch
Source
Injury. 1981 Sep;13(2):93-9
Date
Sep-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Kidney - injuries
Liver - injuries
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Seasons
Spleen - injuries
Sweden
Abstract
Studies have been made in 1407 patients of the causes, the organs involved and the outcome of injury to the abdomen in patients needing admission to hospital in an area of Southern Sweden, between 1950 and the end of 1979. The proportion of female patients and those aged over 60 increased significantly. The seasonal distribution of the injuries showed significant change, with a drop in the initially high frequency sustained during the summer months. Penetrating injuries were rare, but increased in the 1970s. Road traffic accidents as the cause of abdominal injuries rose to a maximum of 56 per cent in the late 1960s. The numbers of injured organs and the frequency of other associated injuries rose gradually until the mid-1970s, after which there was a slight decrease. The spleen, liver and large blood vessels were the organs which were increasingly often injured. The annual incidence of various visceral injuries per 100 000 population was calculated. The number of patients with a delay of at least 24 hours before operation fell significantly and there was a tendency to shorter hospital stay. The mortality curve showed a peak in the late 1960s.
PubMed ID
7327735 View in PubMed
Less detail

Absence of LKM-1 antibody reactivity in autoimmune and hepatitis-C-related chronic liver disease in Sweden. Swedish Internal Medicine Liver club.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34389
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1997 Feb;32(2):175-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1997
Author
S. Lindgren
H B Braun
G. Michel
A. Nemeth
S. Nilsson
B. Thome-Kromer
S. Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Medicine, University of Lund, Malmö General Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1997 Feb;32(2):175-8
Date
Feb-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Autoantibodies - blood
Autoimmunity - immunology
Child
Cholangitis, Sclerosing - immunology
Chronic Disease
Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System
Female
Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect
Hepatitis - immunology
Hepatitis C - immunology
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis, Biliary - immunology
Liver Diseases - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Type-2 autoimmune hepatitis is a subgroup of chronic hepatitis characterized by the presence of liver/kidney microsomal autoantibodies type 1 (LKM-1). A frequent association with chronic hepatitis C suggests that hepatitis virus might trigger autoimmune reactivity. LKM-1-positive chronic hepatitis is not uncommon in southern Europe but is rarely seen in the USA and the UK. The prevalence in Scandinavia is hitherto unknown. METHODS: We used an automated prototype LKM-1 immunometry-based assay (IMx) to detect LKM-1 antibodies in sera from 350 Swedish patients with chronic liver diseases (100 with primary biliary cirrhosis, 80 with primary sclerosing cholangitis, 100 with hepatitis C, and 70 patients with various forms of chronic hepatitis, including 36 autoimmune cases), and from 17 children with autoimmune hepatitis. Sera reactive in the IMx assay were subjected to immunofluorescence testing. RESULTS: No clearly LKM-reactive sera were detected. Serum samples from 29 patients were borderline reactive in the IMx assay but tested negative in the confirmatory immunofluorescence test. Positive tests in the former assay were likely caused by reactivity against microsomal antigens other than LKM-1/cytochrome P450IID6. CONCLUSIONS: LKM-1-positive type-2 autoimmune hepatitis is very rare in Sweden. Furthermore, chronic hepatitis C did not trigger this type of autoimmune reactivity in our patients, probably owing to genetic insusceptibility.
PubMed ID
9051879 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Absorptive and excretory functions of the liver in chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer in children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42369
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1976 Mar-Apr;(2):10-2
Publication Type
Article

Acetaminophen availability increases in Canada with no increase in the incidence of reports of inpatient hospitalizations with acetaminophen overdose and acute liver toxicity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177413
Source
Am J Ther. 2004 Nov-Dec;11(6):443-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
Mary Jane Prior
Kimberly Cooper
Peter Cummins
Debra Bowen
Author Affiliation
Research and Development, McNeil Consumer and Specialty Pharmaceuticals, Fort Washington, Pennsylvania 19034, USA. mprior@mccus.jnj.com
Source
Am J Ther. 2004 Nov-Dec;11(6):443-52
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetaminophen - adverse effects
Adolescent
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Analgesics, Non-Narcotic - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Drug Overdose
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Drug and Narcotic Control - legislation & jurisprudence
Drug-Induced Liver Injury - epidemiology - etiology
Hospital records
Humans
Middle Aged
Abstract
In September 1999, several Canadian provinces had place-of-sale restrictions lifted that had limited the sale of acetaminophen >325 mg and packages >24 tablets (any strength) to pharmacies only. This allowed the sale of all strengths of immediate-release acetaminophen in all package sizes in nonpharmacy locations. This study's purpose was to explore the effect that lifting restrictions on acetaminophen place of sale may have had on reported hospitalizations in Canada related to acetaminophen overdose toxicity. Using hospital discharge data, provinces with no preexisting restrictions on place of sale were compared with those in which restrictions were lifted in September 1999. Cases of reported APAP overdose included ICD-9/9-CM code 965.4, ICD-9 code E850.2, or ICD-9-CM code E850.4. Cases with reported acute liver toxicity included ICD-9/9-CM codes 570, 572.2, 572.4, V42.7, or procedure code 50.5. There were no significant differences between the 1.5-year periods pre- and post-September 1999 in annual incidence rates per 100,000 persons ages >/=12 years of hospitalizations reported with acetaminophen overdose, either overall or limited to those with death as an outcome, or in hospitalization reports with both acetaminophen overdose and acute liver toxicity, either overall (provinces with no restrictions: pre = 0.70, post = 0.80, P = 0.6328; provinces with restrictions lifted in September 1999: pre = 0.49, post = 0.47, P = 0.8649) or limited to those with death as an outcome (provinces with no restrictions: pre = 0.22, post = 0.12, P = 0.3030; provinces with restrictions lifted in September 1999: pre = 0.13, post = 0.09, P = 0.3589). In conclusion, the decision to lift Canadian place-of-sale restrictions increased acetaminophen availability and did not increase the rate of reported hospitalizations related to acetaminophen overdose toxicity.
PubMed ID
15543083 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acquired aplastic anaemia in seven children with severe hepatitis with or without liver failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87545
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2007 Nov;96(11):1660-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Honkaniemi Emma
Gustafsson Britt
Fischler Björn
Nemeth Antal
Frost Britt-Marie
Papadogiannakis Nikos
Winiarski Jacek
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Clintec, Karolinska Institutet, S-141 86 Stockholm, Sweden. emma.honkaniemi@karolinska.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2007 Nov;96(11):1660-4
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anemia, Aplastic - etiology - therapy
Biopsy
Bone Marrow Cells - pathology
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Hepatitis - complications - pathology - physiopathology
Humans
Liver - pathology
Liver Failure - etiology
Male
Medical Records
Parvovirus - pathogenicity
Retrospective Studies
Serologic Tests
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
AIM: Aplastic anaemia following hepatitis may develop in as many as 1 of 3 patients with non-A, non-B and non-C hepatitis. Several causative factors have been discussed, such as viral infections and autoimmunity. Here we describe the natural history of this condition in 7 children and investigate possible hepatitis-causing agents. METHODS: We reviewed the medical records, bone marrow and liver biopsies of 7 children with severe hepatitis, with or without liver failure, who subsequently had developed aplastic anaemia. RESULTS: The median time from onset of hepatic symptoms until diagnosed onset of aplasia was 54 days. No associated viral infections could be identified. On liver biopsy, a majority had lobular inflammation but lacked signs of autoimmune hepatitis, findings compatible with a viral aetiology. Three of 6 children had low reticulocyte counts already at onset of hepatitis. All, but one patient is alive at median follow-up of 8 years. CONCLUSION: The unknown pathogenetic mechanism appears to target liver and bone marrow simultaneously, because half of the children concomitantly had low reticulocyte counts and severe liver failure.
PubMed ID
17888058 View in PubMed
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390 records – page 1 of 39.