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23 records – page 1 of 3.

Source
Bulletin No. 10
Publication Type
Report
Date
14 June 1974
  1 website  
Author
Division of Public Health, Section of Epidemiology
Author Affiliation
State of Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
Source
Bulletin No. 10
Date
14 June 1974
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, Angiosarcoma, liver, tumor
Online Resources
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Arctic survival rations. X. Diurnal variations of some liver constituents in rats fed pemmican meals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297222
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report AAL-TDR-62-54.
Publication Type
Report
Date
March 1963
Author
Vaughan, D.A.
Winders, R.L.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report AAL-TDR-62-54.
Date
March 1963
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Animals
Rats
Liver
Pemmican
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Cold induced changes in fatty acids of the rat and hamster.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297275
Source
Arctic Aeroemedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report 67-5.
Publication Type
Report
Date
April 1967
the rat and the hamster. This elevated level of unsaturation is maintained during hibernation in the hamster. Brown adipose shows no increase in unsaturation under these same conditions. During the process of cold acclimation, a relatively higher level of unsa~uration occurs in the liver of the
  1 document  
Source
Arctic Aeroemedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report 67-5.
Date
April 1967
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1099801
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Rats
Hamsters
Adipose Tissue
Hibernation
Liver
Abstract
Data are presented to show that cold acclimation induces an increase in the relative level of unsaturation in white adipose tissue of both the rat and the hamster. This elevated level of unsaturation is maintained during hibernation in the hamster. Brown adipose shows no increase in unsaturation under these same conditions. During the process of cold acclimation, a relatively higher level of unsaturation occurs in the liver of the hamster but not in that of the rat. Hibernation does not alter the level of saturation in the liver of the hamster.
Notes
ALASKA RC955.U9 no.67-5
Documents
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Comparison of swimming and cold in rats which were fed periodically.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297279
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-66-13.
Publication Type
Report
Date
February 1967
diets (2 hours daily) were either forced to swim at 38 - 40° C for 1-1 /2 hours daily for 15 days .or kept in a 7° C cold room.for approximately 4 weeks. On the low-carbohydrate diet, liver glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase) were elevated in both swimmers and
  1 document  
Author
Vaughan, David A.
Stull, Harold D.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-66-13.
Date
February 1967
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
788067
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Rats
Cold exposure
Exercise
High-fat diets
Glucose-6-phosphatase
Liver Glycogen
Glutamic pyruvic transaminase
Abstract
Rats fed meals of high- and low- carbohydrate diets (2 hours daily) were either forced to swim at 38 - 40° C for 1-1 /2 hours daily for 15 days .or kept in a 7° C cold room.for approximately 4 weeks. On the low-carbohydrate diet, liver glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase) were elevated in both swimmers and cold-exposed rats. In high-carbohydrate-fed swimming and cold-exposed rats, liver GPT was elevated, but G-6-Pase rose only in the cold-exposed rats. Peak liver glycogen in the high-carbohydrate-fed swimmers was depressed, while in high-carbohydrate-fed., cold-exposed rats it reached higher levels following meals. High-fat diets did not adversely affect swimming capacity of rats. It is suggested that cyclic events in the glycolytic components of livers of rats fed carbohydrate meals are altered in different ways and thus preclude using cold as a model for exercise. When high-fat diets are fed, these cycles are minimized and the responses to the two stresses are similar.
Notes
ALASKA RC955.U9 no.66-13
Documents
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Concentrations of chlorinated hydrocarbons, heavy metals and other elements in tissues banked by the Alaska Marine Mammal Tissue Archival Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300569
Source
U.S. Deprtment of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology and U.S. Department of Interior, Minerals Management Service, Alaska OCS Region.
Publication Type
Report
Date
March 1995
: Belukha Whale Blubber 45 B . Quality Control in Organic Analysis 59 C . Inorganic Data: Liver Tissue of Pinnipeds from Norton Sound, Belukha Whales and Bowhead Whales 72 D. Quality Control in Inorganic Analysis 114 ii TABLES Page 1 . Locations of arrangements for routine sample collections for
  1 document  
Author
Becker, Paul R.
Mackey, Elizabeth A.
Schantz, Michele M.
Demiralp, Rabia
Greenberg, Roert R.
Koster, Barbara J.
Wise, Stephen A.
Muir, Derek C.G.
Source
U.S. Deprtment of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology and U.S. Department of Interior, Minerals Management Service, Alaska OCS Region.
Date
March 1995
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
5452555
Keywords
Alaska
Chlorinated hydrocarbons
Belukha whale blubber
Liver tissue
Spotted seal
Ringed seal
Bowhead Whale
Bearded seal
PCBs
DDE
DDT
Notes
OCS Study MMS 95-0036
NISTIR 5620
Documents
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Distribution of blood in the arousing hibernator.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297260
Source
Alaskan Air Command. Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report 61-11.
Publication Type
Report
Date
October 1961
.~~·- ~ikevv:i~e the lungs, diaphragm, and brown fat show a substantial increase in blood flow. Blood flow to gastrointestinal tissues is greatly reduced in the arousing animals, whereas flow to the skin, liver, and thyroid shows insignificant differences. DISTRmUTION. OF BLOOP IN THE A~OU~INO HIBERN~TOR
  1 document  
Author
Johansen, Kjell.
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory
Source
Alaskan Air Command. Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report 61-11.
Date
October 1961
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
727020
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Hibernation
Blood
Circulation
Lungs
Liver
Thyroid
Abstract
The distribution of circulating blood has been studied in the arousing hibernator following the method of fractional distribution of radioactive indicators (Sapirstein, 1958). The results indicate a conspicuous differential vasoconstriction of the posterior part of the animal during the most active phase of arousal. The blood flow to skeletal muscle in the front part of the arousing animals is more than 16 times greater than in the awake non-hibernating animals. The perfusion rate to the myocardium is twice as large in the arousing animal. Likewise the lungs, diaphragm, and brown fat show a substantial increase in blood flow. Blood flow to gastrointestinal tissues is greatly reduced in the arousing animals, whereas flow to the skin, liver, and thyroid shows insignificant differences.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.61-11
Documents
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Effect of cold on blood clearance of carbon and bacteria of different virulence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298773
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-64-14. 14 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
January 1965
in radioactivity of blood with time . Livers of mice were sampled at times postinfection for radioactivity and for viable bacterial counts. Housing temperature had no effect on radioactivity changes, but viable counts were higher and decreased more slowly in mice at 5° C than at 25° C. These
  1 document  
Author
Berry, L. Joe
Smythe, Dorothy S.
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Biology, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-64-14. 14 p.
Date
January 1965
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1147370
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Mice
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Blood
Carbon
Salmonella typhimurium
Livers
Abstract
Mice singly housed without bedding at 5° C clear carbon from the blood more slowly than animals similarly housed at 25° C. Increasing the time of exposure to cold to 2, 18 or 72 hours does not further alter the rate of clearance. Bacteria are also "cleared" uniformly at the two temperatures when a highly virulent strain (SR-11) of Salmonella typhimurium is injected intravenously, but not when one of low virulence (RIA) is used. The RIA strain disappears from blood more slowly in mice at 5° C than in those at 25° C. This was demonstrated both by dilution counts and by labeling the bacteria with p32 and following the decline in radioactivity of blood with time. Livers of mice were sampled at times postinfection for radioactivity and for viable bacterial counts. Housing temperature had no effect on radioactivity changes, but viable counts were higher and decreased more slowly in mice at 5° C than at 25° C. These findings are believed to account, in part, for the greater susceptibility to infection with RIA that was previously seen in mice exposed to cold compared to those at 25° C.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.64-14
Documents
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Effect of protein intake and cold exposure on slected liver enzymes associated with amino acid metabolism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297209
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report AAL-TDR-62-61.
Publication Type
Report
Date
January 1963
Author
Klain, G.J.
Vaughan, D.A.
Vaughan, Lucile N.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report AAL-TDR-62-61.
Date
January 1963
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Protein
Metabolism
Amino acids
Liver
Enzymes
Cold Temperature
Less detail

Effects of cold acclimatization on liver di- and triphosphopyridine nucleotide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298689
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-40. 7 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
January 1963
REF ALASKA RC 955 .U9 no . 62- 40 1963 COPY 1 AAL-TDR-62-40 EFFECTS OF COLD ACCLIMATIZATION ON LIVER DI- AND TRIPHOSPHOPYRIDINE NUCLEOTIDE John P. Hannon A r thur Ros e nthal TECHNICAL DOCUMENTARY REPORT AAL-TDR-62-40 January 1963 ARCTIC AEROMEDICAL LABORATORY AEROSPACE
  1 document  
Author
Hannon, John P.
Rosenthal, Arthur
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-40. 7 p.
Date
January 1963
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1049777
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Rats
Liver
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Nucleotides
Enzymes
Abstract
The levels of oxidized and reduced di- and triphosphopyridine nucleotide were measured in liver tissue from rats that had been exposed to cold (4° ± 1° C) for one month. These animals exhibited about 65% more TPNH and total triphosphopyridine nucleotide than control animals maintained at an ambient temperature of 25° ± 1° C. The significance of these alterations to the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation is discussed.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-40
Documents
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Enzyme induction and cortisone protection in endotoxin-poisoned mice at 25° C compared with that at 5° C.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298769
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-64-8. 17 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
January 1965
Ll.BRABt ABSTRACT Mice housed at 25° C are protected by cortisone against endotoxin lethality when the hormone is given at the same time as the poison, but not an hour or two later. This is not true of mice housed at 5° C. Activity of liver tryptophan pyrrolase is lowered by endotoxin and
  1 document  
Author
Berry, L. Joe
Smythe, Dorothy S.
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Biology, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-64-8. 17 p.
Date
January 1965
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1650243
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Mice
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Endotoxin
Cortisone
Liver
Abstract
Mice housed at 25° C are protected by cortisone against endotoxin lethality when the hormone is given at the same time as the poison, but not an hour or two later. This is not true of mice housed at 5° C. Activity of liver tryptophan pyrrolase is lowered by endotoxin and elevated by cortisone only in animals at normal temperatures. When endotoxin and hormone are given concurrently, normal enzyme activity is maintained, but activity decreases when the hormone injection is given an hour or more after endotoxin. Actinomycin D, ethionine, 2-thiouracil, and 8-azaguanine (inhibitors of protein synthesis) when given in sublethal amount: potentiate endotoxin, prevent cortisone protection against endotoxin, and block the hormonal induction of tryptophan pyrrolase. Chloramphenicol has none of these effects. Mice infected with Salmonella typhimurium have lower than normal tryptophan pyrrolase activity and a smaller induction of enzyme by cortisone 18 hours postinfection than do normal mice or mice 42 hours postinfection. This occurs only at 25° C.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.64-8
Documents
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23 records – page 1 of 3.