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[Alcohol consumption and liver enzymes in persons 30-50 years of age. Cross-sectional study from Ebeltoft]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10941
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Sep 29;159(40):5945-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-29-1997
Author
F H Steffensen
H T Sørensen
A. Brock
H. Vilstrup
T. Lauritzen
Author Affiliation
Aarhus Universitet, Sundhedsprojekt Ebeltoft, Institut for Almen Medicin og Center for Epidemiologisk Grundforskning.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Sep 29;159(40):5945-50
Date
Sep-29-1997
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alanine Transaminase - blood
Alcohol Drinking
Aspartate Aminotransferases - blood
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Liver - enzymology
Liver Diseases, Alcoholic - diagnosis - enzymology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Abstract
In a representative population sample of 905 persons we examined the prevalence of raised levels of liver-derived enzymes and its possible association with self-reported alcohol consumption adjusted for smoking and BMI applying logistic regression analyses. A large proportion of 12% (women 8%; men 16%) presented raised liver-derived enzymes. Below 21 units per week (one unit equals 12 grams of alcohol) there was no association with self-reported alcohol consumption. However, the risk of abnormal liver enzymes increased with higher consumption for both sexes; if the intake was above 28 units per week, the odds ratio for raised liver enzymes increased dramatically. Whether this subclinical biochemical liver condition is an early marker of alcohol-related liver damage remains to be seen, but the long-term consequences of the reported alcohol consumption and the frequency of raised liver enzymes require follow-up.
PubMed ID
9381568 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol consumption and serum liver-derived enzymes in a Danish population aged 30-50 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11094
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1997 Feb;26(1):92-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1997
Author
F H Steffensen
H T Sørensen
A. Brock
H. Vilstrup
T. Lauritzen
Author Affiliation
Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, University of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1997 Feb;26(1):92-9
Date
Feb-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alanine Transaminase - metabolism
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - metabolism
Aspartate Aminotransferases - metabolism
Body mass index
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health education
Humans
Incidence
Liver - enzymology
Liver Function Tests
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
gamma-Glutamyltransferase - metabolism
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Based on the increased consumption of alcohol in Denmark the aim of this study was to measure prevalence of abnormal liver-derived enzymes in a homogeneous Danish population and possible associations with alcohol consumption, smoking and body mass index (BMI). METHOD: In a representative population sample of 905 people (aged 30-50) from the baseline survey of the Ebeltoft Health Promotion Project in Denmark, we examined prevalence of abnormal liver-derived enzymes and its possible association with self-reported alcohol consumption, smoking and BMI, applying logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: In a significant proportion, 12% (women 8%; men 16%) of the cohort we found raised levels of liver-derived enzymes associated with moderate self-reported alcohol intake adjusted for BMI and smoking. If the intake was higher than moderate, i.e. > 28 units per week (one unit equals 12 g of alcohol), the odds ratio (OR) for raised liver enzymes increased further; S-gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) (OR: for women 24.4; men 18.4). S-aspartate-aminotransferase (ASAT) (24.2; 5.8) and S-alanine-aminotransferase (ALAT) (27.2; 3.0). Furthermore, daily smoking increased the risk of raised liver enzymes in women (OR: 3.4-4.2), and obesity (BMI > or = 30 kg/m2) in men showed a positive association with all three enzymes (OR: 3.0-9.0). CONCLUSIONS: The occurrence of raised liver-derived enzymes was frequent in the Danish population sample and associated with moderate self-reported alcohol consumption adjusted for BMI and smoking.
PubMed ID
9126508 View in PubMed
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Appendicectomy and perioperative mortality in patients with liver cirrhosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196323
Source
Br J Surg. 2000 Dec;87(12):1664-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
T L Poulsen
A M Thulstrup
H T Sørensen
H. Vilstrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aalborg Hospital and Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Br J Surg. 2000 Dec;87(12):1664-5
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Appendectomy - contraindications - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis - complications - mortality - surgery
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
PubMed ID
11122181 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in liver-derived enzymes and self-reported alcohol consumption. A 1-year follow-up study in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10701
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1999 Feb;34(2):189-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
A M Thulstrup
H T Sørensen
F H Steffensen
H. Vilstrup
T. Lauritzen
Author Affiliation
Danish Epidemiology Science Centre at the Dept. of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, The Ebeltoft Health Promotion Study.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1999 Feb;34(2):189-93
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alanine Transaminase - blood
Alcohol Drinking - metabolism
Aspartate Aminotransferases - blood
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Liver - enzymology
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
gamma-Glutamyltransferase - blood
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The association between alcohol intake and liver disease is well known, but little is known about alcohol consumption and changes in liver-derived enzymes within 1 year. In a 1-year follow-up study we examined changes in liver-derived enzymes and their association with self-reported alcohol consumption. METHODS: We recorded liver-derived enzyme values, self-reported alcohol consumption, and potential confounder variables at base line and at a 1-year follow-up in a representative sample of 822 persons (aged 30-50 years) from the survey of The Ebeltoft Health Promotion Project in Denmark, by using questionnaires, health examinations, and blood samples. RESULTS: The prevalence of increased liver-derived enzyme values was 11.1% at base line and 11.8% at the 1-year follow-up. The incidence rate of increased liver-derived enzyme values was 5.1 per 100 person-years, and 34% of the cases of increased liver-derived enzyme values returned to normal within I year. We found an odds ratio of 4.0 for men and 8.0 for women of developing increased liver-derived enzyme values if alcohol consumption was more than 21 units a week. The risk seemed to be dose-dependent. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of increased liver-derived enzyme values in the population was high and increased slightly during the study period. There was a strong association between the incidence rate of increased liver-derived enzyme values and self-reported alcohol consumption in a dose-dependent relationship, also when adjusted for confounding by smoking and obesity. The persons with persistently increased enzyme values had a higher weekly alcohol consumption than the rest of the study population.
PubMed ID
10192199 View in PubMed
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Cirrhosis and mortality risks of biopsy-verified alcoholic pure steatosis and steatohepatitis: a nationwide registry-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125360
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2012 Jun;35(11):1336-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
T. Deleuran
H. Grønbaek
H. Vilstrup
P. Jepsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine V, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. thomas.deleuran@dce.au.dk
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2012 Jun;35(11):1336-42
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biopsy
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Fatty Liver, Alcoholic - mortality - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - mortality - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
Alcoholic fatty liver disease comprises alcoholic pure steatosis and alcoholic steatohepatitis. These diseases are prevalent, but their prognostic outcome is uncertain, particularly regarding the impact of hepatic inflammation. The paucity of data based on liver biopsy diagnoses contributes to this uncertainty.
To examine the cirrhosis and mortality risks of Danish men and women with biopsy-verified alcoholic pure steatosis or steatohepatitis.
In this registry-based historical cohort study we combined liver biopsy diagnoses with hospital discharge diagnoses from nationwide healthcare registries to identify all Danish citizens with alcoholic pure steatosis (N = 136) or alcoholic steatohepatitis (N = 58) during 1997-2008. We enrolled a reference cohort of 100 gender- and age-matched persons from the general population for each patient and compared cirrhosis and mortality risks through 2010.
The 5-year cirrhosis risks were 6.9% (95% CI: 3.4-12.2%) for patients with alcoholic pure steatosis and 16.0% (95% CI: 7.8-26.8%) for patients with alcoholic steatohepatitis, their 5-year mortality risks were 16.7% (95% CI: 11.3-24.2%) and 25.1% (95% CI: 15.7-38.9%), respectively. Patients with steatohepatitis had a higher liver-related mortality than patients with pure steatosis. In the reference cohort, the 5-year cirrhosis and mortality risks were 0.3% and 4.3%, respectively.
Patients with alcoholic fatty liver disease had markedly increased cirrhosis and mortality risks compared with a matched reference cohort. The cirrhosis risk was more than twice as high for the patients with steatohepatitis than for those with pure steatosis; and was higher for women than for men.
PubMed ID
22490057 View in PubMed
Less detail

Data quality of administratively collected hospital discharge data for liver cirrhosis epidemiology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209336
Source
J Med Syst. 1997 Feb;21(1):11-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1997
Author
K. Vestberg
A M Thulstrup
H T Sørensen
P. Ottesen
S. Sabroe
H. Vilstrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine V, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
J Med Syst. 1997 Feb;21(1):11-20
Date
Feb-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biopsy
Data Collection - standards
Denmark
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Registries - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
We estimated the validity, i.e., whether the diagnostic criteria were fulfilled for the patients registered with the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis in a Danish hospital discharge registry, and the completeness, i.e., whether all patients with liver cirrhosis were included in the registry. Information in the regional hospital discharge registry in the Country of Aarhus, Denmark was compared with hospital records and information in a pathology registry. 85.4% of the patients registered with a diagnosis of liver cirrhosis fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis (validity). 93.2% of the patients registered with biopsy proven liver cirrhosis in the pathology registry were found in the discharge registry (completeness) with a diagnosis of liver cirrhosis. The hospital discharge registry showed relatively few misclassifications and the Danish National Registry of Patients (NRP), which is based on the regional registries, may provide a unique study base for future research.
PubMed ID
9172066 View in PubMed
Less detail

Decreased muscle strength and contents of Mg and Na,K-pumps in chronic alcoholics occur independently of liver cirrhosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9787
Source
J Intern Med. 2003 Mar;253(3):359-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
N K Aagaard
H. Andersen
H. Vilstrup
T. Clausen
J. Jakobsen
I. Dørup
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine V (Hepatology and Gastroenterology), Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. niels@akh.aaa.dk
Source
J Intern Med. 2003 Mar;253(3):359-66
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - physiopathology
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Ion Channels - physiology
Isotonic Contraction
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - physiopathology
Magnesium - analysis
Male
Muscle, Skeletal - chemistry - physiology
Na(+)-K(+)-Exchanging ATPase - analysis
Potassium - analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sodium - analysis
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the influence of established liver cirrhosis on muscle strength and muscle contents of magnesium (Mg), potassium (K) and sodium, potassium pumps (Na,K-pumps) in chronic alcoholic patients. DESIGN: An open cross-sectional study. SETTING AND SUBJECTS: Forty consecutive chronic alcoholics (18 with cirrhosis and 22 without cirrhosis) admitted to the Department of Hepatology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, or to a collaborating alcoholism treatment centre, and 36 healthy control subjects. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Evaluation of participant's subjective physical ability and measurement of maximum isokinetic muscle strength and muscle mass, as well as measurements of Mg, K and Na,K-pumps in skeletal muscle. RESULTS: Maximum isokinetic muscle strength and muscle mass were equally reduced in patients with and without cirrhosis (P
PubMed ID
12603504 View in PubMed
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Increased risk and case fatality rate of pyogenic liver abscess in patients with liver cirrhosis: a nationwide study in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196103
Source
Gut. 2001 Feb;48(2):260-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
I. Mølle
A M Thulstrup
H. Vilstrup
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital and Aalborg Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. im@dadlnet.dk
Source
Gut. 2001 Feb;48(2):260-3
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Liver Abscess - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Liver Cirrhosis - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Poisson Distribution
Prognosis
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
Patients with liver cirrhosis are at increased risk of serious bacterial infections carrying a high case fatality rate. Case reports have suggested an association between liver cirrhosis and pyogenic liver abscess.
To estimate the risk and case fatality rate of pyogenic liver abscess in Danish patients with liver cirrhosis compared with the background population.
Identification of all patients with liver cirrhosis and pyogenic liver abscess over a 17 year period in the National Registry of Patients. Information on death was obtained from the Danish Central Person Registry.
We identified 22 764 patients with liver cirrhosis and 665 patients with pyogenic liver abscess, of whom 21 were cirrhotics and 644 were non-cirrhotics. The crude incidence rate of liver abscess in cirrhotics was 23.3 (95% CI 14.4-35.6) per 100 000 person years. The age adjusted risk of liver abscess was increased 15-fold in patients with cirrhosis compared with the background population. The 30 day case fatality rates in patients with liver abscess and cirrhosis were 38.5% (13.9-68.4) in alcoholic cirrhosis and 62.5% (24.5-91.5) in non-alcoholic cirrhosis compared with 26.9% (23.5-30.5) in liver abscess patients from the background population. After adjustment for sex, age, and comorbidity, the relative risk of death was increased more than fourfold in alcoholic cirrhosis and non-alcoholic cirrhosis compared with the background population.
Liver cirrhosis is a strong risk factor for pyogenic liver abscess associated with a poor prognosis.
Notes
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PubMed ID
11156650 View in PubMed
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Long-term prognosis for transplant-free survivors of paracetamol-induced acute liver failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141307
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2010 Oct;32(7):894-900
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
P. Jepsen
L E Schmidt
F S Larsen
H. Vilstrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine V, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. pj@dce.au.dk
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2010 Oct;32(7):894-900
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetaminophen - adverse effects
Adult
Aged
Denmark
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Liver Failure, Acute - chemically induced - mortality - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The prognosis for transplant-free survivors of paracetamol-induced acute liver failure remains unknown.
To examine whether paracetamol-induced acute liver failure increases long-term mortality.
We followed up all transplant-free survivors of paracetamol-induced acute liver injury, hospitalized in a Danish national referral centre during 1984-2004. We compared age-specific mortality rates from 1 year post-discharge through 2008 between those in whom the liver injury led to an acute liver failure and those in whom it did not.
We included 641 patients. On average, age-specific mortality rates were slightly higher for the 101 patients whose paracetamol-induced liver injury had caused an acute liver failure (adjusted mortality rate ratio = 1.70, 95% CI 1.02-2.85), but the association was age-dependent, and no survivors of acute liver failure died of liver disease, whereas suicides were frequent in both groups. These observations speak against long-term effects of acute liver failure. More likely, the elevated mortality rate ratio resulted from incomplete adjustment for the greater prevalence of substance abuse among survivors of acute liver failure.
Paracetamol-induced acute liver failure did not affect long-term mortality. Clinical follow-up may be justified by the cause of the liver failure, but not by the liver failure itself.
PubMed ID
20735774 View in PubMed
Less detail

The macrophage activation marker sCD163 is associated with changes in NAFLD and metabolic profile during lifestyle intervention in obese children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273278
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2015 Jun;10(3):226-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
K. Kazankov
H J Møller
A. Lange
N H Birkebaek
P. Holland-Fischer
J. Solvig
A. Hørlyck
K. Kristensen
S. Rittig
A. Handberg
H. Vilstrup
H. Grønbaek
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2015 Jun;10(3):226-33
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alanine Transaminase - blood
Antigens, CD - metabolism
Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic - metabolism
Behavior Therapy
Biomarkers - blood - metabolism
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Caloric Restriction
Child
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Life Style
Macrophage Activation
Male
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease - epidemiology - metabolism - therapy
Pediatric Obesity - blood - epidemiology - metabolism - prevention & control
Receptors, Cell Surface - metabolism
Risk Reduction Behavior
Weight Loss
Abstract
Obesity is associated with metabolic derangement and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Macrophages are involved in liver inflammation and fibrosis, and soluble (s)CD163 is a macrophage activation marker.
To associate sCD163 with parameters of paediatric obesity and NAFLD, as well as changes in these parameters during lifestyle intervention.
We studied 117 obese children during a 10-week lifestyle intervention; 71 completed the 12-month follow-up. We recorded clinical and biochemical data, and performed liver ultrasonography.
Baseline sCD163 was higher in children with elevated alanine transaminase (ALT) (2.3?±?0.7 vs. 2.0?±?0.6?mg?L(-1), P?=?0.03), steatosis (2.3?±?0.7 vs. 2.0?±?0.6?mg?L(-1), P?=?0.01) and high paediatric NAFLD fibrosis index (2.3?±?0.7 vs. 1.9?±?0.6?mg?L(-1) , P?=?0.03). Baseline sCD163 was independently associated with ALT, cholesterol and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). The change in sCD163 during lifestyle intervention was associated with changes in ALT, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), hs-CRP and cholesterol, and inversely associated with the change in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol.
sCD163 was associated with markers of liver injury and metabolic parameters in obese children, and changes in these parameters during lifestyle intervention. This may suggest that activated macrophages play a role in NAFLD and sCD163 may serve as a marker of liver disease severity and treatment effect.
PubMed ID
25073966 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.