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12 records – page 1 of 2.

Diagnostic and prognostic value of laboratory tests assessed in a follow-up study of 200 patients with liver disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56994
Source
Clin Chem. 1982 May;28(5):1177-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1982
Author
S. Skrede
H E Solberg
S. Ritland
J P Blomhoff
E. Schrumpf
K. Elgjo
E. Gjone
Source
Clin Chem. 1982 May;28(5):1177-81
Date
May-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biopsy
Blood Coagulation Factors - analysis
Ceruloplasmin - analysis
Comparative Study
Diagnosis, Differential
Diagnostic Errors
Hepatitis - diagnosis
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Immunoglobulin M - analysis
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - diagnosis
Liver Cirrhosis, Biliary - diagnosis
Liver Diseases - blood - diagnosis - pathology
Norway
Probability
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Two hundred patients with liver disease were re-studied after six to eight years. The initial routine diagnosis (mainly based on morphological criteria) was confirmed in almost 80% of cases of chronic liver disease. In chronic active hepatitis, agreement was found in 86%. An alternative classification based on cluster analysis of clinical chemical results from the first admission was also to a great extent confirmed by the follow-up study. Discriminant analysis of clinical chemical data correctly allocated 94% of patients with alcoholic cirrhosis (who had low haptoglobin and albumin) into groups with different prognosis. Clinical chemical results differed between verified and non-verified cases of primary biliary cirrhosis. By retrospective examination , we found that 15 of 16 patients with this disease or chronic active hepatitis who were initially misclassified by biopsy findings could be correctly diagnosed by discriminant analysis of clinical chemical results.
PubMed ID
7074900 View in PubMed
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Is a 3-day limit for highly urgent liver transplantation for fulminant hepatic failure appropriate, and is the diagnosis in some cases incorrect?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194335
Source
Transplant Proc. 2001 Jun;33(4):2511-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001

Liver disease in anti-hepatitis C virus-positive Norwegian blood donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11626
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1994 Jan;29(1):77-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1994
Author
I. Nordøy
E. Schrumpf
K. Elgjo
O. Flesland
J. Andersen Glende
H. Orjasaeter
J C Siebke
Author Affiliation
Medical Dept. A, National Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1994 Jan;29(1):77-81
Date
Jan-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alanine Transaminase - blood
Base Sequence
Blood Donors
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Hepacivirus - immunology - isolation & purification
Hepatitis Antibodies - analysis
Hepatitis C - epidemiology
Hepatitis, Chronic - epidemiology
Humans
Immunoblotting
Liver Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Molecular Sequence Data
Norway - epidemiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Prospective Studies
RNA, Viral - analysis
Substance-Related Disorders
Abstract
In a prospective study of 16,756 consecutive blood donors, we found 54 donors (0.3%) to be anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV)-positive by a first-generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. After retesting, 18 donors were confirmed positive or indeterminate by a second-generation recombinant immunoblot assay. Sixteen of these donors were found positive by a second-generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and 15 of these were positive by HCV polymerase chain reaction with two primer sets. Nine donors (50%) had a history of drug abuse. In 15 donors found positive by a second-generation enzyme-linked immunoblot assay liver biopsy specimens were taken after at least 6 months' follow-up. In all except one hepatitis C RNA-negative donor, histologic abnormalities were observed, even when alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) levels were continuously normal or only moderately elevated. The abnormalities were less pronounced in these donors (n = 5) than in donors with ALAT levels increased more than twice the upper normal limit (p
PubMed ID
8128181 View in PubMed
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[Liver transplantation--development and experiences].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200480
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Sep 20;119(22):3310-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-20-1999
Author
O. Søreide
B. Husberg
K. Bjøro
E. Schrumpf
Author Affiliation
Kirurgisk avdeling, Rikshospitalet, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Sep 20;119(22):3310-4
Date
Sep-20-1999
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Priorities
Humans
Liver Transplantation - contraindications - mortality - standards - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Quality of Life
Registries
United States
Abstract
A liver transplant program was established in Norway in 1984, and until March 1999 200 liver transplantations have been carried out. Data for these 200 consecutive patients are briefly outlined with emphasis on survival. Relevant data are also given from the Nordic Liver Transplant Registry (NLTR), the European Liver Transplant Registry (ELTR) and from United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS). Future trends and potential advances in liver transplantation are briefly discussed. One-year and three-year survival rates for Norwegian patients have increased markedly over the years and were 85% and 75% respectively for the 1995-98 period. The number of liver transplantations per million population per year was 3.4 in Norway, 7.8 in Sweden, 5.7 in Finland and 5.4 in Denmark (1990-98). The low number of liver transplantations in Norway warrants attention. It is possible that some patients with end stage liver disease have not been offered this treatment modality. Monitoring of results and active participation in international liver transplant registries like NLTR and ELTR is an important quality control instrument.
PubMed ID
10533415 View in PubMed
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[Liver transplantation in Norway. Results after 10 years and 114 transplantations]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34944
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Jan 10;116(1):19-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-1996
Author
K. Bjøro
E. Schrumpf
A. Bergan
A. Flatmark
O. Mathisen
G. Sødal
O. Søreide
T. Sanengen
R. Innes
S. Osnes
Author Affiliation
Medisinsk avdeling A, Rikshospitalet, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Jan 10;116(1):19-24
Date
Jan-10-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
English Abstract
Graft Rejection
Humans
Liver Transplantation - adverse effects - standards - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Postoperative Complications - mortality
Waiting Lists
Abstract
A total of 114 liver transplantations were performed in 106 patients in Norway during 1984-1994. Survival after one year was 65% and after three years 57%. The most frequent causes of death were infections and rejections. The survival rate improved considerably during the period, and after 1990 the 1 year survival was 70%. Approximately 2/3 of the patients return to work or education. Very few patients die later than 12 months after the transplantation. The most frequent indications were primary biliary cirrhosis, metabolic liver disease, primary sclerosing cholangitis, autoimmune cirrhosis and fulminant liver failure. The number of liver transplantations (approximately 4 per million inhabitants) is lower in Norway than in the other Nordic countries. The number should be increased to 7-8 per million inhabitants.
PubMed ID
8553329 View in PubMed
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Liver transplantation in patients over 60 years of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196366
Source
Transpl Int. 2000;13 Suppl 1:S165-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
K. Bjøro
K. Höckerstedt
B G Ericzon
S. Friman
A. Hjortrup
S. Keiding
E. Schrumpf
F. Duraj
M. Olausson
H. Mäkisalo
A. Bergan
P. Kirkegaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine A, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Transpl Int. 2000;13 Suppl 1:S165-70
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Creatinine - blood
Humans
Liver Transplantation - mortality - physiology - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Prothrombin Time
Retrospective Studies
Scandinavia
Serum Albumin - analysis
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Transplantation, Homologous
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Liver transplantation was previously only offered to patients under 60 years of age. We have analyzed the outcome after acceptance on the waiting list and after liver transplantation of patients over 60 years old. A total of 150 patients over 60 years old were listed for a first liver transplantation during 1990-1998. The annual number increased throughout the period. Primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and acute hepatic failure were the most frequent diagnoses. A total of 119 patients received a first liver allograft. The patient 1-year survival was 75% and 3-year survival 62%, which was not significantly lower (P = 0.21) than that of the younger patients. When correcting for year of transplantation, the survival was, however, moderately but significantly lower than among the younger patients. Survival among those > 65 years (n = 38) did not differ from that of patients 60-65 years of age (n = 81). We conclude that an increasing number of patients over 60 years old can be listed for liver transplantation and receive a liver allograft with highly satisfying results.
PubMed ID
11111989 View in PubMed
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Liver transplantation in the Nordic countries, 1982-1998: changes of indications and improving results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20862
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1999 Jul;34(7):714-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
K. Bjøro
S. Friman
K. Höckerstedt
P. Kirkegaard
S. Keiding
E. Schrumpf
M. Olausson
A. Oksanen
H. Isoniemi
A. Hjortrup
A. Bergan
B G Ericzon
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Medicine A, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1999 Jul;34(7):714-22
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Cholangitis, Sclerosing - surgery
Epidemiologic Studies
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Immunosuppression
Infant
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - surgery
Liver Cirrhosis, Biliary - surgery
Liver Failure, Acute - surgery
Liver Neoplasms - surgery
Liver Transplantation - statistics & numerical data - trends
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications
Registries
Regression Analysis
Reoperation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Survival Analysis
Tissue Donors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Liver transplantation has become an established therapeutic option for patients with life-threatening liver disease. The aim of the present study was to analyse the results of and developments in liver transplantation in the Nordic countries during a 15-year period. METHODS: Data on all patients receiving a liver allograft in the Nordic countries during 1982-98 and waiting list data for all patients listed for a liver transplantation after 1989 were obtained from the Nordic Liver Transplantation Registry. RESULTS: A total of 1485 first liver transplantations were performed during 1982-98. The annual number of first liver transplantations increased steadily up to 1993, thereafter remaining around 150-170 per year. There are major differences between countries both in the number of transplants adjusted to populations performed per year, with more than twice as many performed in Sweden as in Norway, and in the relative distribution of patients in accordance with diagnosis. The number of patients more than 60 years old increased and comprised 13%-14% of the total patient population during 1996-98. Primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, acute hepatic failure, malignant liver disease, and alcoholic cirrhosis are the five most frequent diagnoses. The over-all 1-year patient survival probability has increased from 66% among patients receiving a transplant in 1982-89 to 83% in 1995-1998. The waiting time remains stable, with a median waiting time of 35 days during 1990-98. The mortality of patients while on the waiting list is 7.4% and is not increasing. CONCLUSION: Results of liver transplantation in the Nordic countries are very similar to those obtained in other countries. Waiting time and mortality remain low. There are, however, major differences between the countries both as to the number of transplantations performed and as to distribution of diagnoses.
Notes
Comment In: Scand J Gastroenterol. 1999 Jul;34(7):642-310466872
PubMed ID
10466884 View in PubMed
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Outcome following liver transplantation for primary sclerosing cholangitis in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182300
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2003 Nov;38(11):1176-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
B. Brandsaeter
S. Friman
U. Broomé
H. Isoniemi
M. Olausson
L. Bäckman
B. Hansen
E. Schrumpf
A. Oksanen
B G Ericzon
K. Höckerstedt
H. Mäkisalo
P. Kirkegaard
K. Bjøro
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Medicine, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway. bjorn.brandsaeter@rikshospitalet.no
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2003 Nov;38(11):1176-83
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - etiology - mortality
Child
Cholangitis, Sclerosing - epidemiology - surgery
Cholecystectomy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gallbladder Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - surgery
Liver Cirrhosis, Biliary - surgery
Liver Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Liver Transplantation - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is the most common indication for liver transplantation in the Nordic countries. Because these patients are difficult to evaluate with regard to timing of liver transplantation, it is important to establish predictors of post-transplant survival.
Data from two groups of patients receiving liver allografts during 1982-2001 were recorded: (a) PSC patients and (b) comparison patients. Outcome following transplantation has been recorded for all patients. Regression analyses have been performed for PSC patients to analyse predictors of patient and graft survival.
A total of 245 PSC and 618 comparison patients received a first liver allograft in the period 1982 until the end of the study. The overall 1-, 3- and 5-year patient survival rates were 82%, 77% and 75%, and 80%, 77% and 74% in the PSC group and comparison group, respectively. Survival following transplantation has increased with time in both the PSC and the comparison group. Recent year of transplantation, no previous hepatobiliary surgery and a lower MELD score were predictors of survival following transplantation for PSC patients. PSC patients had a higher rate of re-transplantations (13% versus 8%, P = 0.01). Predictors of re-transplantation in PSC patients were an episode of early rejection and vascular thrombosis.
In PSC patients, year of transplantation, previous hepatobiliary surgery and MELD score are predictors of survival following transplantation and these patients are more frequently in need of re-transplantation compared to the comparison group.
PubMed ID
14686722 View in PubMed
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Patients with small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis have a favourable long term prognosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18840
Source
Gut. 2002 Nov;51(5):731-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
E. Björnsson
K M Boberg
S. Cullen
K. Fleming
O P Clausen
O. Fausa
E. Schrumpf
R W Chapman
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. einar.bjornsson@medic.gu.se
Source
Gut. 2002 Nov;51(5):731-5
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bile Duct Neoplasms - pathology
Bile Ducts - pathology - physiopathology
Cholangiocarcinoma - pathology
Cholangitis, Sclerosing - mortality - pathology - physiopathology
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Liver Function Tests
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Patients with cholestatic liver function tests and histological features of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) but a normal cholangiogram are considered to have small duct PSC. The natural history of this condition is unknown. METHODS: Thirty three patients with small duct PSC were identified among patients admitted for diagnostic workup of cholestatic liver function tests in one centre in the UK (Oxford) and one centre in Norway (Oslo). A total of 260 patients with large duct PSC were compared, and prognosis in terms of death, cholangiocarcinoma, biochemical features, histological features, and symptoms analysed. RESULTS: Mean age at diagnosis was 38 years and 39 years in small duct and large duct PSC, respectively. Mean follow up was 106 months in small duct and 105 months in large duct patients. Four patients originally considered to have small duct developed large duct PSC. Two of these underwent liver transplantation during follow up. Of the remainder who did not develop large duct PSC, two patients died during follow up: one of liver failure and the other of cardiac death unrelated to her liver disease. A total of 122 (47%) large duct patients either required liver transplantation (34 patients) or died (88 patients). Small duct patients had a significantly better survival compared with large duct patients. Among small duct patients, none developed cholangiocarcinoma compared with 28 of 260 (11%) large duct patients. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with small duct PSC seem to have a good prognosis in terms of survival and development of cholangiocarcinoma. Small duct PSC progresses to large duct PSC in a small proportion of patients.
PubMed ID
12377815 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.