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Are there geographical disparities in access to liver transplantation in Atlantic Canada?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119930
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2012 Oct;26(10):705-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Paul Douglas Renfrew
Michele Molinari
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia. p.d.renfrew@dal.ca
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2012 Oct;26(10):705-10
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - surgery
End Stage Liver Disease - surgery
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Healthcare Disparities - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Liver Diseases - surgery
Liver Neoplasms - surgery
Liver Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
New Brunswick
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nova Scotia
Prince Edward Island
Young Adult
Abstract
To characterize the patient population served by Atlantic Canada's Multi-Organ Transplant Program liver transplant service over the first five years of activity in its current iteration.
Data from a prospective institutional database, supplemented by retrospective medical record review, were used to identify and characterize the cohort of patients assessed for consideration of first liver transplant between December 1, 2004 and December 1, 2009.
In the five-year period after reactivation, the program assessed 337 patients for first liver transplant. The median age at referral for this group of 199 men (59.0%) and 138 women (41.0%) was 56.1 years (range 16.3 to 72.3 years). The leading three liver diseases indicating liver replacement were alcohol-related end-stage liver disease (20.5%), hepatocellular cancer (16.6%) and hepatitis C-related end-stage liver disease (14.0%). When evaluated according to provincial population-standardized incidence, significant differences in the incidence of liver transplant assessment among the four Atlantic Canadian provinces were found (per 100,000 inhabitants: Nova Scotia 19.8, New Brunswick 13.0, Newfoundland and Labrador 9.1 and Prince Edward Island 11.0; Fisher's exact P
Notes
Cites: Transplantation. 2003 Nov 15;76(9):1385-814627921
Cites: Transplantation. 2003 Nov 15;76(9):1389-9414627922
Cites: Transplantation. 2003 Nov 15;76(9):1395-814627923
Cites: Transplantation. 2003 Nov 15;76(9):1398-40314627924
Cites: Liver Transpl. 2004 Nov;10(11):1422-715497151
Cites: Med Care. 1993 Nov;31(11):1027-428231335
Cites: Clin Transplant. 2012 Jul-Aug;26(4):600-722211831
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1998 Oct 29;339(18):1322-59791151
Cites: Liver Transpl. 2008 Jan;14(1):18-2418161800
Cites: JAMA. 2008 Jan 9;299(2):202-718182602
Cites: Transplantation. 2011 Feb 27;91(4):479-8621200366
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2011 Jul;25(7):359-6421876856
Cites: Transplantation. 1997 Jan 27;63(2):255-629020327
PubMed ID
23061063 View in PubMed
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Aspects of present and future data presentation in Scandiatransplant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89507
Source
Transplant Proc. 2009 Mar;41(2):732-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Grunnet N.
Bödvarsson M.
Jakobsen A.
Kyllönen L.
Olausson M.
Pfeffer P.
Sørensen S Schwartz
Author Affiliation
Scandiatransplant, Aarhus, Denmark. grunnet@scandiatransplant.org
Source
Transplant Proc. 2009 Mar;41(2):732-5
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Brain Death
Cadaver
Cause of Death
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Finland
Forecasting
Heart Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Kidney Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Liver Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Lung Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Organ Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Resource Allocation - statistics & numerical data
Scandinavia
Tissue Donors - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Scandiatransplant is the Nordic organ exchange organization having existed for almost 40 years. With close collaboration between transplant centers in the Nordic countries, it has been valuable to ensure the optimal usage of available organs. The heart is the most often exchanged organ within the collaboration. It has been decided to create a priority for hyperimmunized kidney patients for compulsory exchange of organs from deceased donors. The age of the deceased organ donors has changed from younger to older donors. The evaluation of deceased kidney transplantations and deceased liver transplantations from 1995 to 2007 is shown for 4 countries. Iceland by itself is performing living donor kidney transplantations with great intensity. Scandiatransplant will make efforts to present more data than just transplantation to yield a more complete picture of organ transplantation.
PubMed ID
19328968 View in PubMed
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Calculation and comparison of the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score in patients accepted for liver transplantation in 1999 and 2004.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78457
Source
Transplant Proc. 2007 Mar;39(2):385-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Flodén A.
Castedal M.
Friman S.
Olausson M.
Backman L.
Author Affiliation
Department of Transplantation and Liver Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. anne.floden@vgregion.se
Source
Transplant Proc. 2007 Mar;39(2):385-6
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis - surgery
Liver Failure - surgery
Liver Neoplasms - surgery
Liver Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Male
Patient Selection
Prognosis
Reoperation - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
There has been a need to assess the "sickness degree" in patients with acute and chronic hepatic failure. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score was developed as a tool for a more objective estimate of the "degree" of sickness in patients with chronic liver disease. In this study, the MELD score was retrospectively calculated and compared in adult patients accepted for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) in our institution in 1999 and 2004. We analyzed the gender, age, and MELD score associated with different indications for OLT during this period.
PubMed ID
17362737 View in PubMed
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The Canadian Organ Replacement Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213046
Source
Clin Transpl. 1996;:91-107
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
S R Walker
D A Parsons
P. Coplestons
S S Fenton
P D Greig
Author Affiliation
Canadian Institute for Health Don Mills, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Clin Transpl. 1996;:91-107
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cadaver
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Family
Female
Geography
Graft Survival
Heart Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Kidney Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Liver Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Living Donors
Lung Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreas Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Renal Replacement Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Survival Rate
Tissue Donors
Tissue and Organ Procurement - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Transplantation - mortality - physiology - statistics & numerical data
Waiting Lists
Abstract
The analyses presented in this chapter are a subset of the yearly audit of organ donation and transplantation in Canada published in the CORR Annual Report. They represent the collaborative efforts and the voluntary contributions of many of the transplant physicians, surgeons, nurses and coordinators in Canada. In Canada, organ donation has remained static at approximately 14 per million population. Despite many local and provincial as well as corporate initiatives, this rate is approximately half the current rate in many regions of the U.S.A. and Spain. The modest increases in transplant activity represent an increase in the use of living donors, reassessment of the traditional donor risk factors (including age) and expansion of the potential donors for each organ. Analysis of the renal transplant activity has determined that the likelihood of being transplanted during the first year on the list was less than 40%. A graft loss rate of 4% per year after the first year was observed for a cadaveric kidney, compared with graft loss rates of 3% and 2% per year for living-related and living-unrelated donor kidneys, respectively. Cox regressional analysis identified that the major determinants of patient survival were the transplant year, the region where the transplant was performed, the presence of diabetes, the recipient's age, and whether the kidney was from a living donor. Liver transplantation has increased each year at the transplant centers in Vancouver, Edmonton, London, Toronto, Montreal, and Halifax. Patient and graft survival rates have improved since 1985 and the most significant determinant of patient survival following transplantation was the patient's medical status at the time of transplantation. Living-related liver donor transplant programs have begun in London and Toronto. Pancreas transplantation remains limited across Canada, but with the development of new pancreas programs in Toronto and Halifax, an increase in the availability of this therapy for Type 1 diabetics is anticipated. Heart transplantation has recovered from a decline in 1991-1992 to approximately 6 hearts per million population. There has been a trend towards better one- and 3-year patient survival rates since 1985. With the development of a lung transplantation program in Winnipeg, lung transplantation has increased. This likely reflects increased utilization of the available donor lungs. A particular increase in double-lung transplants was noted.
PubMed ID
9286560 View in PubMed
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Characteristics and long-term outcome of patients with autoimmune hepatitis related to the initial treatment response.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98330
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2010 Apr;45(4):457-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Mårten Werner
Sven Wallerstedt
Stefan Lindgren
Sven Almer
Einar Björnsson
Annika Bergquist
Hanne Prytz
Hanna Sandberg-Gertzén
Rolf Hultcrantz
Per Sangfelt
Ola Weiland
Bodil Ohlsson
Ake Danielsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Sections for Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. marten.werner@vll.se
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2010 Apr;45(4):457-67
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Progression
Female
Hepatitis, Autoimmune - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Liver Function Tests
Liver Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a liver disease which, if untreated, may lead to liver cirrhosis and hepatic failure. Limited data exist regarding factors predicting the long-term outcome. The aims of this study were to investigate symptoms at presentation, prognostic features, management and treatment in relation to long-term outcome of AIH. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cohort of 473 Swedish patients with AIH was characterized regarding initial symptoms and signs, factors predicting death and future need for liver transplantation. Survival and causes of death were retrieved from Swedish national registers. RESULTS: At diagnosis, fatigue was a predominant symptom (69%), 47% of the patients were jaundiced and 30% had liver cirrhosis. Another 10% developed cirrhosis during follow-up. Markedly elevated alanine aminotransferase levels at presentation were correlated with a better outcome. A high international normalized ratio (INR) at diagnosis was the only risk factor predicting a need for later liver transplantation. Histological cirrhosis, decompensation and non-response to initial treatment were all factors that correlated with a worse outcome. Overall life expectancy was generally favourable. However, most deaths were liver-related, e.g. liver failure, shock and gastrointestinal bleeding. CONCLUSIONS: Cirrhosis at diagnosis, a non-response to initial immune-suppressive treatment or elevated INR values were associated with worse outcome and a need for later liver transplantation. In contrast, an acute hepatitis-like onset with intact synthetic capacity indicated a good response to treatment and favourable long-term prognosis. Lifetime maintenance therapy is most often required.
PubMed ID
20082594 View in PubMed
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Fulminant drug-induced hepatic failure leading to death or liver transplantation in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29476
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2005 Sep;40(9):1095-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Einar Björnsson
Pernilla Jerlstad
Annika Bergqvist
Rolf Olsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. einar.bjornsson@medic.gu.se
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2005 Sep;40(9):1095-101
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetaminophen - adverse effects
Adolescent
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analgesics, Non-Narcotic - adverse effects
Anesthetics, Inhalation - adverse effects
Anti-Infective Agents - adverse effects
Child
Comparative Study
Diclofenac - adverse effects
Female
Floxacillin - adverse effects
Halothane - adverse effects
Humans
Liver Failure, Acute - chemically induced - mortality - surgery
Liver Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sulfamethoxazole - adverse effects
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: There are only a few data on the prevalence of drug-induced liver injury associated with fatal outcome. The aim of this study was to determine the nature and number of suspected adverse drug-induced liver disease associated with fatalities and/or liver transplantation since reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) started in Sweden. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All reports of suspected hepatic ADRs with fatal outcome received by the Swedish Adverse Drug Reactions Advisory Committee (SADRAC) from 1966 to 2002 were reviewed and causality assessed. RESULTS: The SADRAC received 151 reports of suspected ADRs with fatal outcome from liver injury; 48 cases were either unlikely or excluded. Of the remaining 103 cases, 13 (13%) were highly probable, 48 (47%) probable and 42 (41%) possible. The median age of the 103 patients was 64 years (47-77 interquartile range (IQR)) and 59 (57%) were males. The majority of cases were classified as hepatocellular (75%), with only 15% cholestatic and 10% mixed. Halothane, paracetamol, flucloxacillin, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim and diclofenac were the most common drugs associated with fatal outcome. Seventeen patients underwent liver transplantation, most commonly because of paracetamol and disulfiram toxicity. CONCLUSIONS: A wide range of suspected ADRs are associated with fatalities. Antibiotics and analgesics are associated with the greatest number of reports of deaths.
PubMed ID
16165719 View in PubMed
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Hepatic and extrahepatic malignancies in primary sclerosing cholangitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19283
Source
J Hepatol. 2002 Mar;36(3):321-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
Annika Bergquist
Anders Ekbom
Rolf Olsson
Dan Kornfeldt
Lars Lööf
Ake Danielsson
Rolf Hultcrantz
Stefan Lindgren
Hanne Prytz
Hanna Sandberg-Gertzén
Sven Almer
Fredrik Granath
Ulrika Broomé
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Huddinge University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, 141 86, Stockholm, Sweden. annika.berquist@medhs.ki.se
Source
J Hepatol. 2002 Mar;36(3):321-7
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Autopsy - statistics & numerical data
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - mortality
Cholangitis, Sclerosing - mortality - surgery
Colorectal Neoplasms - mortality
Female
Humans
Incidence
Liver Neoplasms - mortality
Liver Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatic Neoplasms - mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND/AIMS: To assess the risk of hepatic and extrahepatic malignancies in a large cohort of Swedish primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) patients compared with that of the general Swedish population. METHODS: The study cohort comprised 604 PSC patients identified between 1970 and 1998. Follow-up was provided through linkages to the Swedish Cancer and Death registries. Cumulative incidence of malignancies and standard incidence ratio were calculated with the incidence rates in the Swedish population, taking into account: sex, age and calendar year as comparison group. RESULTS: Median time of follow-up was 5.7 years (range 0-27.8). Seventy-nine percent had concomitant inflammatory bowel disease. The cause of death was cancer in 44%. The frequency of hepatobiliary malignancies was 13.3% (81/604). Thirty-seven percent (30/81) of all hepatobiliary malignancies were diagnosed less than 1 year after the diagnosis of PSC. The risk for hepatobiliary malignancy was increased 161 times, for colorectal carcinoma 10 times and for pancreatic carcinoma 14 times, compared with that of the general population. CONCLUSIONS: In this national-based study including the largest cohort of PSC patients ever presented, the frequency of cholangiocarcinoma is 13%. The risk of hepatobiliary carcinoma is constant after the first year after PSC diagnosis with an incidence rate of 1.5% per year. The risk of pancreatic carcinoma is increased 14 times compared with the general Swedish population. These results are suggestive of an increased risk of pancreatic carcinoma in patients with PSC.
Notes
Comment In: J Hepatol. 2002 Mar;36(3):433-411867189
Comment In: J Hepatol. 2002 Mar;36(3):435-811867190
PubMed ID
11867174 View in PubMed
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Indications for liver transplantation in British Columbia's Aboriginal population: a 10-year retrospective analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196740
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2000 Oct;14(9):775-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
E M Yoshida
N R Caron
A K Buczkowski
L T Arbour
C H Scudamore
U P Steinbrecher
S R Erb
S W Chung
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia.
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2000 Oct;14(9):775-9
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - ethnology
Databases, Factual
European Continental Ancestry Group
Hepatitis C - ethnology - surgery
Hepatitis, Autoimmune - ethnology - surgery
Humans
Indians, North American
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - ethnology - surgery
Liver Cirrhosis, Biliary - ethnology - surgery
Liver Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Patient Selection
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
To study the indications for liver transplantation among British Columbia's First Nation population.
A retrospective analysis of the British Columbia Transplant Society's database of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal liver transplant recipients from 1989 to 1998 was undertaken. For primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), the transplant assessment database (patients with and without transplants) was analyzed using a binomial distribution and compared with published census data regarding British Columbia's proportion of Aboriginal people.
Between 1989 and 1998, 203 transplantations were performed in 189 recipients. Fifteen recipients were Aboriginal (n=15; 7.9%). Among all recipients, the four most frequent indications for liver transplantation were hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (n=57; 30.2%), PBC (n=34; 18.0%), alcohol (n=22; 11.6%) and autoimmune hepatitis (n=14; 7.4%). Indications for liver transplantation among Aboriginal people were PBC (n=8; 53.3%; P
PubMed ID
11064314 View in PubMed
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Liver transplantation for alcoholic liver disease among Canadian transplant centres: a national study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107226
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2013 Nov;27(11):643-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Natasha Chandok
Mohammed Aljawad
Angela White
Roberto Hernandez-Alejandro
Paul Marotta
Eric M Yoshida
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2013 Nov;27(11):643-6
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Alcoholism - complications - rehabilitation
Canada
Health Care Surveys
Hepatitis, Alcoholic - physiopathology - surgery
Humans
Liver Diseases, Alcoholic - physiopathology - surgery
Liver Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Patient Selection
Severity of Illness Index
Social Support
Temperance
Time Factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
BACKGROUND/
Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a controversial yet established indication for liver transplantation (LT), and there is emerging evidence supporting a survival benefit in selected patients with severe acute alcoholic hepatitis. The aim of the present survey was to describe policies among Canadian transplant centres for patients with ALD.
A survey was distributed to the medical directors of all seven liver transplant centres in Canada.
All seven liver transplant programs in Canada participated in the survey. Every centre requires patients to have a minimum of six months of abstinence from alcohol before listing for LT. Completion of a rehabilitation program is only mandatory in one program; the remaining programs do not mandate this if patients have demonstrated prolonged abstinence, and sufficient insight and social supports. No program considers LT for patients with severe acute alcoholic hepatitis, although six of the seven programs are interested in exploring a national policy. Random alcohol checks for waitlisted patients are performed routinely on patients listed for ALD at only one centre; the remaining centres only perform checks if there is clinical suspicion. In the past five years, the mean (± SD) number of patients per centre with graft dysfunction from recidivism was 10±4.36; a mean of 2.5±4.36 patients per centre developed graft failure.
With minor exceptions, LT policies for subjects with ALD are uniform across Canadian transplant programs. Presently, no centres perform LT for acute alcoholic hepatitis, although there is broad interest in exploring a national policy. Recidivism resulting in graft loss is a rare phenomenon.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Gastroenterol. 2013 Nov;27(11):625-624199208
PubMed ID
24040631 View in PubMed
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32 records – page 1 of 4.