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Acute hepatic porphyria and cancer risk: a nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285629
Source
J Intern Med. 2017 Sep;282(3):229-240
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
C M Baravelli
S. Sandberg
A K Aarsand
R M Nilsen
M C Tollånes
Source
J Intern Med. 2017 Sep;282(3):229-240
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Endometrial Neoplasms - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Porphobilinogen Synthase - deficiency
Porphyrias, Hepatic - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Acute hepatic porphyria (AHP) is considered to be a risk factor for primary liver cancer (PLC), but varying risk estimates have been published.
Our aim was to investigate the risk of PLC and other cancers in persons with AHP using a nationwide cohort design. Given that greater numbers of women than men tend to have manifest and more severe AHP, a further aim was to investigate sex differences in this risk.
The study sample consisted of all Norwegian residents aged 18 years or older during the period 2000-2011. Persons with AHP (n = 251) were identified through the Norwegian Porphyria Centre, and patients with a cancer diagnosis were identified by linkage to the Cancer Registry of Norway.
For persons with AHP, the annual incidence rate of PLC was 0.35%. PLC risk was substantially higher for individuals with an AHP diagnosis compared to the reference population [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 108, 95% confidence interval (CI) 56-207]. In a meta-analysis of published studies on PLC and AHP, including ours, women had a higher risk than men. In addition, our results suggested that persons with AHP may have increased risks of kidney (aHR 7.4, 95% CI 2.4-23.1) and endometrial cancers (aHR 6.2, 95% CI 2.0-19.3).
Our findings confirmed a substantially higher risk of PLC associated with AHP compared to the general population. In a meta-analysis, the risk was shown to be greater for women than men. The novel findings of a moderate to substantial association between AHP and kidney and endometrial cancers should be investigated further.
PubMed ID
28730628 View in PubMed
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Alcohol drinking, social class and cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11116
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1997;(138):251-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
H. Møller
H. Tønnesen
Author Affiliation
Center for Research in Health and Social Statistics, Danish National Research Foundation, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1997;(138):251-63
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Brazil - epidemiology
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Food Habits
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Humans
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
New Zealand - epidemiology
Population
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Class
Abstract
This chapter reviews the data on occurrence of cancers that are potentially caused by alcohol drinking (cancers of the upper gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts, and liver cancer) in relation to social class. In order to assess the role of alcohol drinking in the observed social class gradients of these cancers, we have particularly looked for consistency in the gradients of different alcohol-related cancers, and used lung cancer occurrence to judge the role of tobacco smoking, which is the major other determinant of these diseases. Additional data on levels of alcohol drinking and on the occurrence of other alcohol-related morbidity are brought into the discussion where available. A role of alcohol drinking in the observed negative social class gradients for alcohol-related cancers is very likely in men in France, Italy and New Zealand. Evidence that is less strong, but is suggestive of a role of alcohol drinking, is seen for men in Brazil, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and Denmark. Although a role of alcohol drinking is likely or possible in certain populations, other factors may contribute as well, most notably tobacco smoking and dietary habits. Additional data on the frequency of complications after surgical procedures in alcohol drinkers are reviewed briefly.
PubMed ID
9353668 View in PubMed
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Alcoholism and cancer risk: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24357
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1992 Sep;3(5):419-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1992
Author
H O Adami
J K McLaughlin
A W Hsing
A. Wolk
A. Ekbom
L. Holmberg
I. Persson
Author Affiliation
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1992 Sep;3(5):419-25
Date
Sep-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Laryngeal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The incidence of cancer was studied in a population-based cohort of 9,353 individuals (8,340 men and 1,013 women) with a discharge diagnosis of alcoholism in 1965-83, followed up for 19 years (mean 7.7). After exclusion of cancers in the first year of follow-up, 491 cancers were observed cf 343.2 expected through 1984 (standardized incidence ratio [SIR] = 1.4, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] = 1.3-1.6). A similar excess risk of cancer was seen among men (SIR = 1.4, CI = 1.3-1.6) and among women (SIR = 1.5, CI = 1.1-2.0). We observed the established associations with cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx (SIR = 4.1, CI = 2.9-5.7), esophagus (SIR = 6.8, CI = 4.5-9.9), larynx (SIR = 3.3, CI = 1.7-6.0), and lung (SIR = 2.1, CI = 1.7-2.6), although confounding by smoking likely increased these risk estimates. While there was evidence of increased risk for pancreatic cancer (SIR = 1.5, CI = 0.9-2.3), alcoholism did not elevate the incidence of cancer of the stomach (SIR = 0.9, CI = 6-1.4), large bowel (SIR = 1.1, CI = 0.8-1.5), prostate (SIR = 1.0, CI = 0.8-1.3), urinary bladder (SIR = 1.0, CI = 0.6-1.5), or of malignant melanoma (SIR = 0.9, CI = 0.3-1.9). Among women, the number of breast cancers observed was close to expected (SIR = 1.2, CI = 0.6-2.2), although a significant excess number of cervical cancers occurred (SIR = 4.2, CI = 1.5-9.1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1525322 View in PubMed
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Alcoholism and liver cirrhosis in the etiology of primary liver cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11847
Source
Int J Cancer. 1992 Jul 30;51(6):898-902
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-30-1992
Author
H O Adami
A W Hsing
J K McLaughlin
D. Trichopoulos
D. Hacker
A. Ekbom
I. Persson
Author Affiliation
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Int J Cancer. 1992 Jul 30;51(6):898-902
Date
Jul-30-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Liver Cirrhosis - complications - epidemiology
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - complications - epidemiology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine the risk of developing primary liver cancer in patients with a diagnosis of alcoholism, liver cirrhosis, or both. Three population-based, mutually exclusive cohorts were defined on the basis of hospital discharge diagnosis between 1965 and 1983. Complete follow-up through 1984--excluding the first year of follow-up--showed that among 8,517 patients with a diagnosis of alcoholism, 13 cancers occurred, vs. 4.2 expected (standardized incidence ratio (SIR) = 3.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.6 to 5.3); among 3,589 patients with liver cirrhosis, 59 cancers occurred, vs. 1.7 expected (SIR = 35.1; 95% CI = 26.7 to 45.3), and among 836 patients with both diagnoses, 11 cancers occurred, vs. 0.3 expected (SIR = 34.3; 95% CI = 17.1 to 61.3). Thus, alcoholism alone entailed a moderately increased risk and alcoholism with liver cirrhosis did not increase the high relative risk for liver cancer more than cirrhosis alone. We conclude that alcohol intake may be a liver carcinogen only by being causally involved in the development of cirrhosis; and further, that the risk of developing liver cancer following cirrhosis in this population is similar to or higher than that after chronic hepatitis-B-virus infection in other Western countries.
PubMed ID
1639537 View in PubMed
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Alpha-particle carcinogenesis in Thorotrast patients: epidemiology, dosimetry, pathology, and molecular analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19345
Source
J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol. 2001;20(4):311-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
Y. Ishikawa
I. Wada
M. Fukumoto
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, The Cancer Institute, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo.
Source
J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol. 2001;20(4):311-5
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alpha Particles - adverse effects
Carcinogens - adverse effects - pharmacokinetics
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - epidemiology - etiology
Cause of Death
Cholangiocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
DNA Damage
DNA Mutational Analysis
Epidemiologic Studies
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Genes, p53
Half-Life
Hemangiosarcoma - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Japan - epidemiology
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Liver Cirrhosis - epidemiology - etiology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Loss of Heterozygosity
Male
Middle Aged
Radiation Injuries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Thorium Dioxide - adverse effects - pharmacokinetics
United States
Abstract
We studied the alpha-radiation risks in patients who received injections of Thorotrast, an X-ray contrast medium used in Europe, Japan, and the United States from 1930 to 1955. Thorotrast was composed of thorium dioxide (ThO2) and Th-232, a naturally occurring radionuclide. Because the physical half-life of ThO2 is 14 billion years and Thorotrast is hardly eliminated from the body, tissues in which it was deposited are irradiated by alpha-radiation for the entire lifetime of the subject. The dosimetry of Thorotrast patients is very complicated, but currently its reliability is quite high compared with other irradiated populations. The major causes of the death of Thorotrast patients are liver cancer, liver cirrhosis, leukemia, and other cancers. Three histologies of liver cancer are found: cholangiocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and angiosarcoma. Although cholangiocarcinoma is the most frequent, angiosarcoma is characteristic of alpha-radiation. Among blood neoplasms with a higher incidence of increase than the general population, erythroleukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome were remarkable. Thorotrast patients exhaled a high concentration of radon (Rn-220), a progeny of Th-232, but no excesses of lung cancer in the patients of Japan, Germany, and Denmark were reported. Mutation analyses of p53 genes and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies at 17p locus were performed to characterize the genetic changes in Thorotrast-induced liver tumors. Interestingly, LOH, supposedly corresponding to large deletions was not frequent; most mutations were transitions, also seen in tumors of the general population, suggesting that genetic changes of Thorotrast-induced cancers are mainly delayed mutations, and not the result of the direct effects of radiation.
PubMed ID
11797840 View in PubMed
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Ambient air pollution and primary liver cancer incidence in four European cohorts within the ESCAPE project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282438
Source
Environ Res. 2017 Apr;154:226-233
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Marie Pedersen
Zorana J Andersen
Massimo Stafoggia
Gudrun Weinmayr
Claudia Galassi
Mette Sørensen
Kirsten T Eriksen
Anne Tjønneland
Steffen Loft
Andrea Jaensch
Gabriele Nagel
Hans Concin
Ming-Yi Tsai
Sara Grioni
Alessandro Marcon
Vittorio Krogh
Fulvio Ricceri
Carlotta Sacerdote
Andrea Ranzi
Ranjeet Sokhi
Roel Vermeulen
Kees de Hoogh
Meng Wang
Rob Beelen
Paolo Vineis
Bert Brunekreef
Gerard Hoek
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Source
Environ Res. 2017 Apr;154:226-233
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Austria - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Incidence
Italy - epidemiology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Nitrogen Oxides - adverse effects - analysis
Particulate Matter - adverse effects - analysis
Vehicle Emissions - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
Tobacco smoke exposure increases the risk of cancer in the liver, but little is known about the possible risk associated with exposure to ambient air pollution.
We evaluated the association between residential exposure to air pollution and primary liver cancer incidence.
We obtained data from four cohorts with enrolment during 1985-2005 in Denmark, Austria and Italy. Exposure to nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOX), particulate matter (PM) with diameter of less than 10µm (PM10), less than 2.5µm (PM2.5), between 2.5 and 10µm (PM2.5-10) and PM2.5 absorbance (soot) at baseline home addresses were estimated using land-use regression models from the ESCAPE project. We also investigated traffic density on the nearest road. We used Cox proportional-hazards models with adjustment for potential confounders for cohort-specific analyses and random-effects meta-analyses to estimate summary hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
Out of 174,770 included participants, 279 liver cancer cases were diagnosed during a mean follow-up of 17 years. In each cohort, HRs above one were observed for all exposures with exception of PM2.5 absorbance and traffic density. In the meta-analysis, all exposures were associated with elevated HRs, but none of the associations reached statistical significance. The summary HR associated with a 10-µg/m(3) increase in NO2 was 1.10 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93, 1.30) and 1.34 (95% CI: 0.76, 2.35) for a 5-µg/m(3) increase in PM2.5.
The results provide suggestive evidence that ambient air pollution may increase the risk of liver cancer. Confidence intervals for associations with NO2 and NOX were narrower than for the other exposures.
PubMed ID
28107740 View in PubMed
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An epidemiologic study of hepatocellular carcinoma in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187668
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Nov-Dec;93(6):443-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Susie elSaadany
Martin Tepper
Yang Mao
Robert Semenciw
Antonio Giulivi
Author Affiliation
Health-Care Acquired Infections Division, Health Canada. susie_elsaadany@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Nov-Dec;93(6):443-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Hepatitis B - epidemiology
Hepatitis C - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Least-Squares Analysis
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Male
Prevalence
Registries
Sex Factors
Abstract
To provide information on poorly described Canadian hepatocellular cancer epidemiology, we analyzed incident cases abstracted from the Canadian Cancer Registration Database (1969-1997) and Canadian annual death data (1969-1998). Age, sex, geographic distribution, and secular trends were described. Projection models were developed for the next decade.
Results indicated much higher incidence and mortality rates in males than females, with substantial increases for both with age. Age-standardized incidence rates increased an average of 3.4% per year in males, 1.2% per year in females (1969-1997). Age-standardized mortality rates increased an average of 1.48% in males, but decreased an average of 0.46% per year in females (1969-1998). Join-point analysis of the linear trends in the age-standardized incidence and mortality rates suggested that a new trend started to emerge about 1991. The fitted non-linear multiplicative model predicted the occurrence of 1,565 new cases and 802 deaths in the year 2010. HCC incidence was the highest in British Colombia, followed by Quebec, and the lowest in the Atlantic region.
Incidence rates of hepatocellular carcinoma have increased substantially, consistent with the reported increase in the prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) infections in recent decades.
PubMed ID
12448868 View in PubMed
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Assessing the management of hepatic colorectal cancer metastases: is treatment consistent in Ontario?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124578
Source
HPB (Oxford). 2012 Jun;14(6):409-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Lakhbir Sandhu
Adrian Fox
Cindy Nhan
Heidi Barnett
Robin S McLeod
Steven Gallinger
Carol-Anne Moulton
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Division of General Surgery, University of Toronto Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, ON, Canada. lakho.sandhu@utoronto.ca
Source
HPB (Oxford). 2012 Jun;14(6):409-13
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catheter Ablation - statistics & numerical data
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Embolization, Therapeutic - statistics & numerical data
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Surveys
Hepatectomy - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internet
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - secondary - therapy
Lung Neoplasms - secondary - therapy
Neoadjuvant Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Ontario - epidemiology
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Pneumonectomy - statistics & numerical data
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Advances in surgical techniques and chemotherapeutic options have expanded indications for surgery in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. This study aimed to examine how hepatopancreatobiliary (HPB) surgeons approach the management of patients with hepatic colorectal cancer metastases (HCCM).
A web-based survey utilizing 10 clinical scenarios was distributed by e-mail to 37 HPB surgeons in Ontario, Canada. The study region has a population of approximately 13 million people and a universal, single-payer health care system. Descriptive analyses were used to tabulate results.
Twenty-two (59%) surgeons responded to the survey. The majority (19/22, 86%) of respondents favoured neoadjuvant chemotherapy for patients with multiple synchronous and unilobar metastases; only nine of 22 (41%) respondents favoured neoadjuvant chemotherapy for patients with a single synchronous metastasis. In the setting of residual resectable disease following downstaging chemotherapy, 77% (17/22) of surgeons advocated hepatic resection with either radiofrequency ablation (RFA) or wedge resection of the 'ghost' lesions. Over 80% of surgeons would perform a liver and pulmonary resection in a patient with hepatic and multiple unilobar lung metastases. None would offer liver resection to patients with multiple retroperitoneal node involvement, although 55% (12/22) would do so if a single retroperitoneal node was involved. Preoperative portal vein embolization was favoured over RFA in patients with a small metastasis and inadequate functional hepatic volume.
Notable heterogeneity was observed among Ontario's HPB surgeons in approaches to HCCM.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22568418 View in PubMed
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Benign hepatic tumours and tumour like conditions in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237433
Source
J Clin Pathol. 1986 Feb;39(2):183-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1986
Author
P J Karhunen
Source
J Clin Pathol. 1986 Feb;39(2):183-8
Date
Feb-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoma - pathology
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Bile Duct Neoplasms - pathology
Finland
Hamartoma - pathology
Hemangioma, Cavernous - pathology
Humans
Hyperplasia - pathology
Liver - pathology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
In a consecutive medicolegal necropsy series benign hepatic tumours and tumour like conditions occurred in 52% of the 95 men aged 35-69 years. The incidence increased with age, mainly due to small bile duct tumours (n = 26; mean age 56.7 years; p less than 0.01; mean size 1.3 mm). The next most common tumours were cavernous hemangiomas (n = 19; mean age 53.9 years; mean size 5.2 mm) that were not related to age. Focal nodular hyperplasia (n = 3; mean size 8.0 mm) tended to occur in a younger age group (mean age 40.3 years; p less than 0.001). Multiple bile duct tumours were present in 46% and hemangiomas in 50% of the men studied. Liver cell adenoma, nodular regenerative hyperplasia, and peliosis hepatis were incidental findings (one case of each). Nodular regenerative hyperplasia was associated with the consumption of alcohol and a total dose of 21.5 g of testosterone. These results indicate that benign hepatic tumours and tumour like conditions are not rare in men but may remain undetected because of their small size.
Notes
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PubMed ID
3950039 View in PubMed
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Body mass index in childhood and adult risk of primary liver cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256976
Source
J Hepatol. 2014 Feb;60(2):325-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Tina Landsvig Berentzen
Michael Gamborg
Claus Holst
Thorkild I A Sørensen
Jennifer L Baker
Author Affiliation
Institute of Preventive Medicine, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals, The Capital Region, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Hepatol. 2014 Feb;60(2):325-30
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Child
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Fatty Liver - complications - pathology
Female
Humans
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Overweight - complications - pathology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Childhood overweight increases the risk of early development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which may predispose to carcinogenesis. We investigated if childhood body size during school ages was associated with the risk of primary liver cancer in adults.
A cohort of 285,884 boys and girls, born 1930 through 1980, who attended school in Copenhagen, were followed from 1977 to 31 December 2010. Their heights and weights were measured by school doctors or nurses at ages 7 through 13 years. Body mass index (BMI) z-scores were calculated from an internal age- and sex-specific reference. Information on liver cancer was obtained from the National Cancer Registry. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of liver cancer were estimated by Cox regression.
During 6,963,105 person-years of follow-up, 438 cases of primary liver cancer were recorded. The hazard ratio (95% CI) of adult liver cancer was 1.20 (1.07-1.33) and 1.30 (1.16-1.46) per 1-unit BMI z-score at 7 years and 13 years of age, respectively. Similar associations were found in boys and girls, for hepatocellular carcinoma only, across years of birth, and after accounting for diagnoses of viral hepatitis, alcohol-related disorders, and biliary cirrhosis.
Higher BMI in childhood increases the risk of primary liver cancer in adults. In view of the high case fatality of primary liver cancer, this result adds to the future negative health outcomes of the epidemic of childhood overweight, reinforcing the need for its prevention.
PubMed ID
24076363 View in PubMed
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153 records – page 1 of 16.