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Abdominal malignancies in patients with Wilson's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18250
Source
QJM. 2003 Sep;96(9):657-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
J M Walshe
E. Waldenström
V. Sams
H. Nordlinder
K. Westermark
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, The Middlesex Hospital, London, UK. penicillamine@waitrose.com
Source
QJM. 2003 Sep;96(9):657-62
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Adenocarcinoma - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Biliary Tract Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Child
Cholangiocarcinoma - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Hepatolenticular Degeneration - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Incidence
Liver Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Long-Term Care
Male
Mutation
Pancreatic Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Wilson's disease is associated with heavy copper overload, primarily in the liver. Copper is a toxic metal, and might be expected to be associated with cancer induction, as iron is in haemochromatosis. However, liver cancer is currently believed to be extremely rare in this disease, and other intra-abdominal malignancies have not been reported. AIM: To assess the frequency of abdominal malignant disease in patients with Wilson's disease on long-term follow-up. DESIGN: Retrospective study in two specialist Wilson's disease clinics: Cambridge/London and Uppsala. METHODS: We reviewed the case records of 363 patients seen at three centres: Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, 1955-1987; the Middlesex Hospital, London, 1987-2000; and the University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden, 1966-2002. Patients were grouped by length of follow-up: 10-19 years; 20-29 years; 30-39 years; and 40 years or more. RESULTS: No cancers were seen in patients followed for
PubMed ID
12925721 View in PubMed
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