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43 records – page 1 of 5.

The abolition of the Swedish alcohol rationing system: effects on consumption distribution and cirrhosis mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12586
Source
Br J Addict. 1987 Jun;82(6):633-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1987

Abstinence from alcohol and alcohol rehabilitation therapy in alcoholic liver disease: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310832
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2020 Apr; 55(4):472-478
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2020
Author
Einar S Björnsson
Kristjan Hauksson
Ragna Sigurdardottir
Margret Arnardottir
Arnar S Agustsson
Sigrun H Lund
Evangelos Kalaitzakis
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2020 Apr; 55(4):472-478
Date
Apr-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Abstinence - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hepatitis, Alcoholic - mortality - rehabilitation
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - mortality - rehabilitation
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
Objective: Abstinence from alcohol is recommended in patients diagnosed with alcoholic hepatitis (AH) and alcoholic cirrhosis (AC). We aimed to determine the impact of alcohol abstinence on prognosis of patients with AC and AH.Methods: All incident AC and AH patients in Iceland 2001-2016 were identified. Cirrhosis was confirmed clinically, biochemically, with imaging and histologically. Abstinence, alcohol rehabilitation and survival were analyzed.Results: Overall, 169 patients with AC and/or AH were identified. Eleven died during index hospitalization, leaving 158 patients for final analysis, median (IQR) age 56?years (48-65), 72% males. Over all 61 patients (39%) had AC, 40 (25%) AH and 57 (36%) features of both. Thirty-nine percent of patients remained abstinent during follow-up and 63% underwent alcohol rehabilitation. Moderate to severe ascites at diagnosis (odds ratio (OR): 3.05, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.37-7.02) and lack of alcoholic rehabilitation (OR: 5.28, 95% CI: 2.24- 14.11) were independent predictors of abstinence. Abstinence at one year of follow-up was not related to increased survival. Patients surviving one year, abstinence during follow-up was related to increased survival for both groups.Conclusion: Abstinence from alcohol following AC/AH diagnosis was achieved in 39% of patients. Abstinence was not related to increased survival for alcoholic liver disease patients at one-year, which might partly indicate that this might be a marker that some patients were 'too sick to drink'. AC and AH patients who survived one year and remained abstinent had a favorable long-term prognosis.
PubMed ID
32233877 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and liver injury: dose-related or permissive effect?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12327
Source
Br J Addict. 1989 Jun;84(6):581-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1989
Author
T I Sørensen
Source
Br J Addict. 1989 Jun;84(6):581-9
Date
Jun-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Alcoholism - mortality
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - mortality
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
The studies addressing the risk of development of cirrhosis of the liver in relation to alcohol consumption have been based on comparisons at the aggregate population level and at the individual level, on case-control studies and cohort studies, and on retrospective and prospective assessment of alcohol consumption. The ideal, but unfeasible, study design for estimation of the risk function is a prospective monitoring of alcohol consumption and recording of rate of development of cirrhosis per unit of time. Two recent studies, approaching this design, suggested that above a rather low, but not precisely determined, level of alcohol consumption, the risk of development of cirrhosis is not further influenced by the amount of alcohol consumed. A critical analysis of previous studies suggests that this risk function actually is compatible with their findings. The contention that alcohol abuse has a permissive rather than a dose-dependent role in the development of alcoholic liver injury encourages research into the additional factors that must act before the liver injury occurs.
PubMed ID
2665882 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and suicide--the Portuguese experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11374
Source
Addiction. 1995 Aug;90(8):1053-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1995
Author
Skog, OJ
Teixeira, Z
Barrias, J
Moreira, R
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Alcohol and Drug Research, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Addiction. 1995 Aug;90(8):1053-61
Date
Aug-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - mortality - psychology
Cause of Death
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - mortality
Male
Portugal - epidemiology
Suicide - psychology - trends
Abstract
An analysis of regional (18 regions) and temporal (1931-89) covariation of suicide rates and indicators of alcohol use and abuse in Portugal is reported. In the time series analysis, a positive relationship was found. An increase in per capita alcohol consumption of one litre is accompanied by a simultaneous increase in the male suicide rate of 1.9 per cent. This is comparable to what has been reported for France and Denmark, but considerably less than that found in Norway, Sweden and Hungary. In the regional data, there was a substantial negative correlation between the variables. However, after controlling for religious and family integration, the latter correlation became small and insignificant but still negative. A possible explanation is suggested for the different outcomes of the two analyses.
PubMed ID
7549774 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and alcohol-related mortality in Canada, 1950-2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180640
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 Mar-Apr;95(2):121-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Mats Ramstedt
Author Affiliation
Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs, Stockholm University, Sweden. mats.ramstedt@sorad.su.se
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 Mar-Apr;95(2):121-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - mortality
Male
Abstract
To describe trends in overall alcohol consumption and alcohol-related mortality in Canada, and to test regional associations between per capita alcohol consumption and alcohol-related mortality.
Alcohol sales for 1950-2000 were used to measure total alcohol consumption; alcohol-related mortality consisted of nine different alcohol-related causes of death for 1950-1998. Alcohol consumption and alcohol-related mortality were described for 1950-2000, and measures of dispersion were calculated to assess the homogeneity across regions.
Both alcohol consumption and alcohol-related mortality increased in all regions up to 1975-80 and then underwent a decline until the 1990s. Since 1996, consumption began to increase. Beer represented more than half of the total consumption throughout the study period, although overall, the share of wine increased, particularly in the larger provinces. Over time there have been fewer differences in per capita consumption and alcohol-related mortality rates across the regions. A strong positive cross-regional relationship was observed between explicitly alcohol-related mortality and per capita consumption, whereas cirrhosis showed only a weak geographical association with consumption.
Since 1950, there has been a general trend toward national homogenization, especially with respect to drinking levels but also to alcohol-related mortality. A strikingly close regional relationship between alcohol consumption and alcohol-related mortality suggests that consumption is an important marker of alcohol-related harm in Canada.
PubMed ID
15074902 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and liver cirrhosis mortality after lifting ban on beer sales in country with state alcohol monopoly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272377
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2015 Aug;25(4):729-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Thorarinn Tyrfingsson
Sigurdur Olafsson
Einar Stefan Bjornsson
Vilhjalmur Rafnsson
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2015 Aug;25(4):729-31
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Beer - statistics & numerical data
End Stage Liver Disease - mortality
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - mortality
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
The objectives were to study alcohol consumption per capita and liver cirrhosis mortality in the population of Iceland.
The Statistic Iceland website supplied alcohol sales figures and death rates.
The alcohol consumption increased 30% during the study period 1982-2009, because of increase in beer and wine, and decrease in spirits consumption. Chronic liver cirrhosis mortality increased significantly for men when comparing the 1982-88 rates (before beer ban was lifted) with the rates for 2003-09.
The findings do not support the suggestion that spirits consumption rather than the total alcohol consumption affect the cirrhosis mortality.
PubMed ID
25085471 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and liver cirrhosis mortality with and without mention of alcohol--the case of Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183999
Source
Addiction. 2003 Sep;98(9):1267-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Mats Ramstedt
Author Affiliation
Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD), Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. mats.ramstedt@sorad.su.se
Source
Addiction. 2003 Sep;98(9):1267-76
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis - mortality
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - mortality
Male
Sex Factors
Abstract
To analyse post-war variations in per capita alcohol consumption in relation to gender-specific liver cirrhosis mortality in Canadian provinces and to assess the extent to which alcohol bears a different relation to cirrhosis deaths with mention of alcohol (alcoholic cirrhosis) compared to cirrhosis deaths without mention of alcohol (non-alcoholic cirrhosis).
Annual liver cirrhosis mortality rates by 5-year age groups were converted into gender-specific and age-adjusted mortality rates. Outcome measures included total cirrhosis-the conventional measure of liver cirrhosis--alcoholic cirrhosis and non-alcoholic cirrhosis. Per capita alcohol consumption was measured by alcohol sales and weighted with a 10-year distributed lag model. A graphical analysis was used to examine the regional relationship and the Box-Jenkins technique for time-series analysis was used to estimate the temporal relationship.
Geographical variations in alcohol consumption corresponded to variations in total liver cirrhosis and particularly alcoholic cirrhosis, whereas non-alcoholic cirrhosis rates were not associated geographically with alcohol consumption. In general, for all provinces, time-series analyses revealed positive and statistically significant effects of changes in alcohol consumption on cirrhosis mortality. In Canada at large, a 1-litre increase in per capita consumption was associated with a 17% increase in male total cirrhosis rates and a 13% increase in female total cirrhosis rates. Alcohol consumption had a stronger impact on alcoholic cirrhosis, which increased by fully 30% per litre increase in alcohol per capita for men and women. Although the effect on the non-alcoholic cirrhosis rate was weaker (12% for men and 7% for women) it was nevertheless statistically significant and suggests that a large proportion of these deaths may actually be alcohol-related.
Some well-established findings in alcohol research were confirmed by the Canadian experience: per capita alcohol consumption is related closely to death rates from liver cirrhosis and alcohol-related deaths tend to be under-reported in mortality statistics.
PubMed ID
12930214 View in PubMed
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Alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver in the Scandinavian countries 1961-1974.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13127
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1977 Dec;6(4):345-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1977
Author
H O Svendsen
J. Mosbech
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1977 Dec;6(4):345-8
Date
Dec-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Female
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - mortality
Male
Scandinavia
Abstract
The increase in mortality from alcohol induced cirrhosis of the liver in Sweden, Norway, Finland and Denmark from 1961 to 1974 is compared. Mortality from alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver increased in Finland and Denmark tenfold and fivefold respectively from 1961 to 1974. The increase has been particularly marked since 1968. In Sweden a threefold increase and in Norway a doubling of mortality in males was ascribed to alcohol induced liver cirrhosis. Mortality from non-alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver remained practically unchanged during the period. Increases in mortality from liver cirrhosis due to alcohol abuse run parallel with increases in alcohol consumption; the countries with the highest mortality have the highest consumption. The distribution of consumption of beer, wine and spirit is compared in the four countries: consumption of spirits predominates in Sweden, in Finland spirits and beer, in Denmark beer and wine and in Norway spirits and beer. Doubling of alcohol consumption in a country is followed by a fourfold increase in the number of addicts, and fourfold increase in alcohol induced diseases.
PubMed ID
608797 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1984 Dec;10(6 Spec No):511-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1984
Author
M. Olkinuora
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1984 Dec;10(6 Spec No):511-5
Date
Dec-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Finland
Health Services - utilization
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - mortality
Male
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Occupations
Risk
Social Class
United States
Abstract
Occupational roles are a dominant force in many aspects of social life. Occupation signifies a complex of social and psychological factors that reflect intelligence, education, personality, ambition, social status, and life-style. The consumption of alcohol and alcoholism have many correlations with occupational roles. Mortality from cirrhosis of the liver reflects the per capita consumption of alcohol. In certain occupations such mortality rates are clearly above average. The highest risk is found in occupations associated with the serving of food and beverages. A Finnish study has shown that the alcohol-related use of health services among males is the highest among unskilled workers, painters, seamen, and construction workers and the lowest among executives and farmers. Many population studies have shown that blue-collar workers and laborers have the highest level of drinking. This pattern is not necessarily true among females. The risk factors associated with occupation include the availability of alcohol at work, social pressure to drink on the job, separation from normal social relationships, and freedom from supervision. The opportunity to obtain alcoholic beverages relatively inexpensively, when combined with social pressure by peers to drink heavily, is an especially powerful explanation for high rates of alcoholism within an occupation.
PubMed ID
6535254 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are decreases in liver cirrhosis rates a result of increased treatment for alcoholism?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232996
Source
Br J Addict. 1988 Jun;83(6):683-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1988

43 records – page 1 of 5.