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1H-MRS Measured Ectopic Fat in Liver and Muscle in Danish Lean and Obese Children and Adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273208
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Cilius Esmann Fonvig
Elizaveta Chabanova
Ehm Astrid Andersson
Johanne Dam Ohrt
Oluf Pedersen
Torben Hansen
Henrik S Thomsen
Jens-Christian Holm
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - physiopathology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dyslipidemias - blood
Fatty Liver - pathology
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Intra-Abdominal Fat - pathology
Linear Models
Lipids - blood
Liver - metabolism - pathology
Male
Muscles - pathology
Overweight
Pediatric Obesity - blood - pathology
Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Puberty
Sex Factors
Subcutaneous Fat - pathology
Abstract
This cross sectional study aims to investigate the associations between ectopic lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle and biochemical measures, estimates of insulin resistance, anthropometry, and blood pressure in lean and overweight/obese children.
Fasting plasma glucose, serum lipids, serum insulin, and expressions of insulin resistance, anthropometry, blood pressure, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of liver and muscle fat were obtained in 327 Danish children and adolescents aged 8-18 years.
In 287 overweight/obese children, the prevalences of hepatic and muscular steatosis were 31% and 68%, respectively, whereas the prevalences in 40 lean children were 3% and 10%, respectively. A multiple regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index z-score (BMI SDS), and pubertal development showed that the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 4.2 (95%CI: [1.8; 10.2], p = 0.0009) when hepatic steatosis was present. Comparing the simultaneous presence of hepatic and muscular steatosis with no presence of steatosis, the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 5.8 (95%CI: [2.0; 18.6], p = 0.002). No significant associations between muscle fat and dyslipidemia, impaired fasting glucose, or blood pressure were observed. Liver and muscle fat, adjusted for age, sex, BMI SDS, and pubertal development, associated to BMI SDS and glycosylated hemoglobin, while only liver fat associated to visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue and intramyocellular lipid associated inversely to high density lipoprotein cholesterol.
Hepatic steatosis is associated with dyslipidemia and liver and muscle fat depositions are linked to obesity-related metabolic dysfunctions, especially glycosylated hemoglobin, in children and adolescents, which suggest an increased cardiovascular disease risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26252778 View in PubMed
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[10 Canadian cases of angiosarcoma of the liver in vinyl chloride workers].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249144
Source
Ann Anat Pathol (Paris). 1978;23(2):97-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
Author
F. Delorme
Source
Ann Anat Pathol (Paris). 1978;23(2):97-104
Date
1978
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Environmental Exposure
Hemangiosarcoma - chemically induced - pathology
Humans
Liver - pathology
Liver Neoplasms - chemically induced - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced
Quebec
Vinyl Chloride - adverse effects
Vinyl Compounds - adverse effects
Abstract
Ten cases of angiosarcoma of the liver among vinyl chloride workers from a plant in Shawinigan, Québec, are reported. The author insist mostly on the occupational history of these workers and on the morphologic description of the lesions. A pathogenic hypothesis is submitted.
PubMed ID
567946 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of death certificates in the diagnosis of alcoholic liver cirrhosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233545
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1988 Feb;12(1):168-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1988
Author
J E Blake
K V Compton
W. Schmidt
H. Orrego
Author Affiliation
Addiction Research Foundation Clinical Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1988 Feb;12(1):168-72
Date
Feb-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Death Certificates
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Liver - pathology
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Abstract
In 108 patients with alcoholic liver disease who died during a 10-year follow-up, the diagnoses from the liver biopsies were compared with that from the Death Certificates. Data show that the currently used ICD-9 category of cirrhosis with or without mention of alcohol has a 47.2% chance of missing the diagnosis of cirrhosis. On the other hand when the mention of liver disease in the Death Certificate is used for the diagnosis of cirrhosis, the percentage of undiagnosed cirrhosis decreases to 19.4% (p less than 0.0001).
PubMed ID
3279851 View in PubMed
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Acquired aplastic anaemia in seven children with severe hepatitis with or without liver failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87545
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2007 Nov;96(11):1660-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Honkaniemi Emma
Gustafsson Britt
Fischler Björn
Nemeth Antal
Frost Britt-Marie
Papadogiannakis Nikos
Winiarski Jacek
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Clintec, Karolinska Institutet, S-141 86 Stockholm, Sweden. emma.honkaniemi@karolinska.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2007 Nov;96(11):1660-4
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anemia, Aplastic - etiology - therapy
Biopsy
Bone Marrow Cells - pathology
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Hepatitis - complications - pathology - physiopathology
Humans
Liver - pathology
Liver Failure - etiology
Male
Medical Records
Parvovirus - pathogenicity
Retrospective Studies
Serologic Tests
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
AIM: Aplastic anaemia following hepatitis may develop in as many as 1 of 3 patients with non-A, non-B and non-C hepatitis. Several causative factors have been discussed, such as viral infections and autoimmunity. Here we describe the natural history of this condition in 7 children and investigate possible hepatitis-causing agents. METHODS: We reviewed the medical records, bone marrow and liver biopsies of 7 children with severe hepatitis, with or without liver failure, who subsequently had developed aplastic anaemia. RESULTS: The median time from onset of hepatic symptoms until diagnosed onset of aplasia was 54 days. No associated viral infections could be identified. On liver biopsy, a majority had lobular inflammation but lacked signs of autoimmune hepatitis, findings compatible with a viral aetiology. Three of 6 children had low reticulocyte counts already at onset of hepatitis. All, but one patient is alive at median follow-up of 8 years. CONCLUSION: The unknown pathogenetic mechanism appears to target liver and bone marrow simultaneously, because half of the children concomitantly had low reticulocyte counts and severe liver failure.
PubMed ID
17888058 View in PubMed
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Acute cholestatic liver injury caused by polyhexamethyleneguanidine hydrochloride admixed to ethyl alcohol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132938
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2011 Jul;49(6):471-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Y N Ostapenko
K M Brusin
Y V Zobnin
A Y Shchupak
M K Vishnevetskiy
V G Sentsov
O V Novikova
S A Alekseenko
O A Lebed'ko
Y B Puchkov
Author Affiliation
Research and Applied Toxicology Center of the Federal Medical-Biological Agency, Moscow, Russia. rtiac2003@yahoo.com
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2011 Jul;49(6):471-7
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcoholic Beverages - poisoning
Central Nervous System Depressants - poisoning
Cholestasis - pathology - ultrasonography
Clinical Laboratory Techniques
Disinfectants - poisoning
Drug-Induced Liver Injury - pathology - ultrasonography
Epidemics
Ethanol - poisoning
Female
Guanidines - poisoning
Hepatic Encephalopathy - chemically induced - psychology
Humans
Liver - pathology
Liver Function Tests
Male
Middle Aged
Poisoning - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Social Class
Young Adult
Abstract
Polyhexamethyleneguanidine hydrochloride (PHMG) is an antimicrobial biocide of the guanidine family. In the period from August 2006 to May 2007, more than 12500 patients were admitted to hospital with a history of drinking illegal cheap "vodka" in 44 different regions in Russia, of whom 9.4% died. In reality, the "vodka" was an antiseptic liquid composed of ethanol (˜93%), diethyl phthalate, and 0.1-0.14% PHMG (brand name "Extrasept-1").
We performed an analysis of the clinical features and outcome in four poisoning treatment centers in the cities of Perm, Ekaterinburg, Irkutsk, and Khabarovsk. A total of 579 patients (215 females and 364 males) with similar symptoms were included.
The main symptoms on admission included jaundice (99.7%), skin itch (78.4%), weakness (96%), anorexia (65.8%), dizziness (65.3%), nausea (54.8%), vomiting (22.6%), stomach ache (52.7%), diarrhea (32%), and fever (50%). Mild symptoms were found in 2.5% of cases, moderate in 63%, and severe in 34.5%. Laboratory results were (mean ± SD): total bilirubin 249 ± 158 µmol/L, direct bilirubin 166 ± 97 µmol/L, cholesterol 14 ± 8 mmol/L, alanine aminotransferase 207 ± 174 IU/L, aspartate aminotransferase 174 ± 230 IU/L, alkaline phosphatase 742 ± 751 IU/L, and gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase 1199 ± 1095 IU/L. Patients generally recovered over a period of 1-5 months, although high levels of alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase were still found in all patients examined after 6 months. Sixty-one patients (10.5%) died between 23 and 150 days after poisoning. Local cholestasis, inflammatory infiltration, and fibrosis developing into cirrhosis were found by liver biopsy.
Acute liver injury caused by PHMG-hydrochloride or PHMG in combination with either ethanol or diethyl phthalate can be characterized as cholestatic hepatitis with a severe inflammatory component causing high mortality.
Notes
Comment In: Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2011 Jul;49(6):441-221824054
Comment In: Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2012 Feb;50(2):154-5; author reply 15622216917
PubMed ID
21761961 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute necrotising hepatitis in Danish farmed hares.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56905
Source
Vet Rec. 1989 Nov 4;125(19):486-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-1989
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1988;223(2):119-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
N. Milman
N. Graudal
P. Strøm
M B Franzmann
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine B, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1988;223(2):119-24
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Comparative Study
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hepatitis, Alcoholic - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Liver - pathology
Liver Function Tests
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
In the period 1970-1984 alcoholic hepatitis was diagnosed by liver biopsy in 52 females. Thirty-six patients with cirrhosis were generally in a worse clinical and biochemical state than those without cirrhosis. Biochemical tests for liver function showed significant improvement from admission to the time of liver biopsy. At follow-up liver function tests were generally better in patients who had stopped drinking alcohol compared to those who continued to do so. The 5-year survival rate was 82% for females without cirrhosis, and 45% for those with cirrhosis (p less than 0.03). Considering the sex-related differences in alcohol abuse in the general population we found no evidence of increased susceptibility to the hepatotoxic effect of alcohol in females.
PubMed ID
3348109 View in PubMed
Less detail

Allogeneic intrabone marrow-bone marrow transplantation plus donor lymphocyte infusion suppresses growth of colon cancer cells implanted in skin and liver of rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78890
Source
Stem Cells. 2007 Feb;25(2):385-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Koike Yasushi
Adachi Yasushi
Suzuki Yasuhiro
Iwasaki Masayoshi
Koike-Kiriyama Naoko
Minamino Keizo
Nakano Keiji
Mukaide Hiromi
Shigematsu Akio
Kiyozuka Yasuhiko
Tubura Airo
Kamiyama Yasuo
Ikehara Susumu
Author Affiliation
First Department of Pathology, Kansai Medical University, 10-15 Moriguchi, Osaka, Japan.
Source
Stem Cells. 2007 Feb;25(2):385-91
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bone Marrow Transplantation
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes - immunology
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Cell Proliferation
Colonic Neoplasms - pathology
Killer Cells, Natural - immunology
Liver - pathology
Lymphocyte Transfusion
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Skin - pathology
Spleen - cytology - immunology
Survival Rate
Transplantation, Homologous
Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
Abstract
We have recently found that allogeneic intrabone marrow-bone marrow transplantation (IBM-BMT) + donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) using CD4(+) cell-depleted spleen cells (CD4(-) cells) can prevent graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) but suppress tumor growth (Meth A: fibrosarcoma) in mice. In the present study, we show that allogeneic IBM-BMT + DLI using CD4(-) cells also has suppressive effects on the growth of colon cancer cells implanted not only in the skin but also in the liver of rats. First, we examined the effects of allogeneic IBM-BMT + DLI on the subcutaneously inoculated ACL-15 (rat colon cancer cell line). Lethally irradiated Fischer rats (F344 rats) were transplanted with T-cell-depleted bone marrow cells (BMCs) from Brown Norway (BN) rats. Simultaneously, DLI was performed using whole spleen cells (whole cells), CD4(+) cell-depleted spleen cells (CD4(-) cells) or CD8(+) cell-depleted spleen cells (CD8(-) cells) of BN rats. Although allogeneic IBM-BMT + DLI suppressed tumor growth, a considerable number of rats treated with allogeneic IBM-BMT + DLI using whole cells or CD8(-) cells died due to GvHD. In contrast, allogeneic IBM-BMT + DLI using CD4(-) cells also suppressed tumor growth, but there was no GvHD. Based on these findings, we next examined the effects of allogeneic IBM-BMT + DLI using CD4(-) cells on the cancer cells implanted in the liver. Allogeneic IBM-BMT + DLI using CD4(-) cells via the portal vein significantly prolonged the survival. These results suggest that allogeneic IBM-BMT + DLI using CD4(-) cells could become a new strategy for the treatment of solid tumors.
PubMed ID
17284650 View in PubMed
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203 records – page 1 of 21.