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44 records – page 1 of 5.

210Pb and 210Po in tissues of some Alaskan residents as related to consumption of caribou or reindeer meat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5061
Source
Health Physics. 1970 Feb;18(2):127-134
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1970

Ah receptor ligands in tobacco smoke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69114
Source
Toxicol Lett. 1988 Aug;42(2):131-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1988
Author
G. Löfroth
A. Rannug
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Toxicol Lett. 1988 Aug;42(2):131-6
Date
Aug-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Binding Sites
Binding, Competitive
Cytosol - analysis
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Liver - analysis
Plants, Toxic
Rats
Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon
Receptors, Drug - analysis
Smoke - analysis
Tars - analysis
Tobacco
Abstract
Tar particulates from cigarette smoke contain compounds with affinity for the Ah receptor. The sidestream activity is larger than that of the mainstream with a ratio of about 5. The compounds causing the affinity appear in the neutral fraction after chemical fractionation excluding basic and acidic components as major contributors to the affinity. The affinity cannot be explained by benzo[a]pyrene and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons but it might be caused by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and related compounds and by oxidized tryptophan derivatives.
PubMed ID
2841776 View in PubMed
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Autopsy data and their total evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252752
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 1975 Jan;23(1):14-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1975
Author
W H Cherry
W F Forbes
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 1975 Jan;23(1):14-21
Date
Jan-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Aged
Autopsy
Bone and Bones - analysis
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Congenital Abnormalities - mortality
Endocrine System Diseases - mortality
Epidemiologic Methods
Gastrointestinal Diseases - mortality
Hematologic Diseases - mortality
Humans
Kidney - analysis
Liver - analysis
Lung - analysis
Male
Metabolic Diseases - mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
Nutrition Disorders - mortality
Ontario
Poisoning - mortality
Respiratory Tract Diseases - mortality
Trace Elements - analysis
Abstract
The role of the autopsy is discussed in the study of the etiology of the current major causes of death (cardiovascular and neoplastic diseases) in developed countries. Evidence is accumulating for the importance of environmental factors in the etiology of these diseases. The study of regional differences in occurrence is described as a method of identifying specific factors. Maps are shown of mortality rates for all causes of death in Ontario counties for males aged 65-74 and 95+ during 1964-68. Some of the difficulties in obtaining data in this form, and in their analysis, are indicated. Regional mortality patterns can be interpreted by the use of associations with available regional socioeconomic measures, or by the use of regional data on trace-metal levels in autopsy samples of human lung, rib, vertebra, kidney and liver. The methodology and the difficulties involved in the determination of trace-metal levels in these tissues are discussed, as is the possible relevance of these levels to the study of degenerative diseases. All these considerations emphasize the valuable contributions of autopsy studies.
PubMed ID
1109383 View in PubMed
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Cadmium exposure in Denmark. Based on analyses of liver and kidney tissues.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38015
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1989 Oct;36(5):499-502
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1989
Author
J C Hansen
P. Grøn
B A Jespersen
J. Voigt
J. Simonsen
J B Dalgaard
E. Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Toxicology, University of Aarhus, Copenhagen.
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1989 Oct;36(5):499-502
Date
Oct-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cadmium - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Infant
Kidney Cortex - analysis
Liver - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Spectrophotometry, Atomic
Abstract
To determine the cadmium exposure level in the Danish population, tissue samples of kidney and liver were collected over the period 1981 to 1987 at the Institutes of Forensic Medicine in Copenhagen, Odense and Aarhus. A total of 795 samples were collected, of which 143 were selected for analysis using, the criteria sudden violent death (accident, homicide or suicide). Cadmium concentrations in kidney cortex increased by age to a maximum of approximately 22 micrograms/g/g (w/w) in the age group 45-55 years and decreased in the older age group, while liver concentrations tended to increase throughout the entire lifespan. Cadmium concentrations in kidney cortex and liver were found significantly correlated. The findings are in good agreement with internationally published data, but lower than previously reported Danish concentration levels. The reason for this difference is discussed.
PubMed ID
2680317 View in PubMed
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Chemical and morphological studies of liver from eider (Somateria mollissima) in Svalbard with special reference to the distribution of copper.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75626
Source
J Comp Pathol. 1990 May;102(4):457-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1990
Author
G. Norheim
B. Borch-Iohnsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Norwegian College of Veterinary Medicine/National Veterinary Institute, Oslo.
Source
J Comp Pathol. 1990 May;102(4):457-66
Date
May-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cadmium - analysis
Copper - analysis - poisoning
Ducks
Female
Liver - analysis - ultrastructure
Male
Microscopy, Electron
Norway
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Selenium - analysis
Sex Factors
Zinc - analysis
Abstract
Specimens of male and brooding female eider (Somateria mollissima) were collected in Svalbard. Chemical analyses revealed hepatic copper concentrations ranging from 20 to 1050 micrograms per g wet weight. This is in agreement with previous results. The selenium, zinc and cadmium values were equal to or slightly higher than previously recorded. It is suggested that the wide variation in copper concentration is a result of differences in intake of copper-containing food among the birds. High selenium intake may enhance copper accumulation. Starvation influences the concentration of zinc and also copper. Zinc concentrations were significantly higher in females. This may be secondary to starvation. The percentage of copper recovered among the soluble proteins was inversely related to the copper content. The distribution of the soluble proteins reflects a normal copper metabolism. Microscopic studies showed prominent dark granules, positive with the rubeanic acid test for copper, confined to hepatocytes. By electron microscopy, the granules appeared as large irregular, electron-dense bodies that, by X-ray microanalysis, were found to contain copper. There were no signs of liver injuries such as necrosis and fibrosis. Apparently, the eider has evolved a high capacity for copper storage.
PubMed ID
2365857 View in PubMed
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[Diagnostic significance of some nonspecific indices in Botkin's disease in children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44790
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1967 Mar-Apr;2:16-7
Publication Type
Article

44 records – page 1 of 5.