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A 10-year follow up of reproductive function in women treated for childhood cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113054
Source
Reprod Biomed Online. 2013 Aug;27(2):192-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
S N Nielsen
A N Andersen
K T Schmidt
C. Rechnitzer
K. Schmiegelow
J G Bentzen
E C Larsen
Author Affiliation
The Fertility Clinic, The Juliane Marie Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Reprod Biomed Online. 2013 Aug;27(2):192-200
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - blood - chemically induced - etiology - pathology
Adult
Anti-Mullerian Hormone - blood
Antineoplastic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infertility, Female - chemically induced - complications - etiology - pathology
Live Birth
Menstruation Disturbances - chemically induced - complications - etiology - pathology
Neoplasms - complications - drug therapy - radiotherapy
Ovary - drug effects - pathology - radiation effects
Pregnancy
Primary Ovarian Insufficiency - chemically induced - complications - etiology - pathology
Remission Induction
Risk
Survivors
Young Adult
Abstract
Previously, this study group found that female childhood cancer survivors could be at risk of early cessation of fertility. The aim of the present study was to evaluate reproductive function in the same group of survivors 10 years after the initial study. Of the original cohort of 100, 71 were re-examined. Thirty-six survivors reported regular menstrual cycles. When they were compared with 210 controls, they differed significantly in antral follicle count (AFC) (median 15 versus 18, P=0.047) but not in anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) (median 13.0 versus 17.8 pmol/l). Survivors cured with minimal gonadotoxic treatment had significantly higher AMH and AFC compared with survivors cured with either potentially gonadotoxic treatment or treatment including alkylating chemotherapy and ovarian irradiation (20.0, 5.8 and
PubMed ID
23768622 View in PubMed
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Anxiety, depression and relationship satisfaction in the pregnancy following stillbirth and after the birth of a live-born baby: a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294808
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2018 01 24; 18(1):41
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-24-2018
Author
Ida Kathrine Gravensteen
Eva-Marie Jacobsen
Per Morten Sandset
Linda Bjørk Helgadottir
Ingela Rådestad
Leiv Sandvik
Øivind Ekeberg
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, P.O box 1171, Blindern, 0318, Oslo, Norway. ida.gravensteen@gmail.com.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2018 01 24; 18(1):41
Date
01-24-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Birth Intervals - psychology
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Interpersonal Relations
Live Birth - psychology
Logistic Models
Maternal Age
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Personal Satisfaction
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - psychology
Pregnant Women - psychology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sexual Partners - psychology
Stillbirth - psychology
Abstract
Experiencing a stillbirth can be a potent stressor for psychological distress in the subsequent pregnancy and possibly after the subsequent birth. The impact on women's relationship with her partner in the subsequent pregnancy and postpartum remains uncertain. The objectives of the study were 1) To investigate the prevalence of anxiety and depression in the pregnancy following stillbirth and assess gestational age at stillbirth and inter-pregnancy interval as individual risk factors. 2) To assess the course of anxiety, depression and satisfaction with partner relationship up to 3 years after the birth of a live-born baby following stillbirth.
This study is based on data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, a population-based pregnancy cohort. The sample included 901 pregnant women: 174 pregnant after a stillbirth, 362 pregnant after a live birth and 365 previously nulliparous. Anxiety and depression were assessed by short-form subscales of the Hopkins Symptoms Checklist, and relationship satisfaction was assessed by the Relationship Satisfaction Scale. These outcomes were measured in the third trimester of pregnancy and 6, 18 and 36 months postpartum. Logistic regression models were applied to study the impact of previous stillbirth on depression and anxiety in the third trimester of the subsequent pregnancy and to investigate gestational age and inter-pregnancy interval as potential risk factors.
Women pregnant after stillbirth had a higher prevalence of anxiety (22.5%) and depression (19.7%) compared with women with a previous live birth (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 5.47, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.90-10.32 and aOR 1.91, 95% CI 1.11-3.27) and previously nulliparous women (aOR 4.97, 95% CI 2.68-9.24 and aOR 1.91, 95% CI 1.08-3.36). Gestational age at stillbirth (>?30 weeks) and inter-pregnancy interval?
Notes
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PubMed ID
29361916 View in PubMed
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Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) in Canada: 2001 results from the Canadian ART Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172836
Source
Fertil Steril. 2005 Sep;84(3):590-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Joanne Gunby
Salim Daya
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. gunbyj@mcmaster.ca
Source
Fertil Steril. 2005 Sep;84(3):590-9
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Live Birth - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
To present the success rates of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) cycles performed in 2001 in Canada.
Retrospective cohort study.
Nineteen of 22 ART centers in Canada.
Couples undergoing ART treatment in Canada during 2001.
Data on each ART cycle performed during 2001 were submitted electronically to the Canadian ART Register (CARTR) by participating centers.
Clinical pregnancy and live birth rate per cycle started, multiple birth rate.
A total of 7,884 ART cycles was reported to CARTR. There were 5,393 in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI) cycles using the woman's own oocytes. Per cycle started, the pregnancy rate was 28.3%, and the live birth rate was 23.1%; the multiple birth rate per delivery was 32.8%. Of cycles with oocytes retrieved, IVF was performed in 44% and ICSI in 56%; the outcomes were similar with the two procedures. There were 301 IVF/ICSI cycles using donor oocytes. The pregnancy rate was 29.2%, and the live birth rate was 22.4%; the multiple birth rate was 43.5%. There were 1,936 frozen embryo transfer cycles using the woman's own oocytes. The pregnancy rate was 18.9%, and the live birth rate was 15.4%; the multiple birth rate was 24.9%.
For 2001, CARTR achieved 86% voluntary participation from Canadian ART centers. Pregnancy and live birth rates comparable to those of other countries were achieved.
Notes
Erratum In: Fertil Steril. 2006 Jan;85(1):272
PubMed ID
16169390 View in PubMed
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Associations of pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain with pregnancy outcome and postpartum weight retention: a prospective observational cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260815
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014;14:201
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Margaretha Haugen
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Anna Winkvist
Lauren Lissner
Jan Alexander
Bente Oftedal
Per Magnus
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014;14:201
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Body mass index
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Emergencies
Female
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Institute of Medicine (U.S.)
Live Birth - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Parity
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Thinness - epidemiology
United States
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Abstract
Excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with pregnancy complications, and Norwegian Health Authorities have adopted the GWG recommendations of the US Institute of Medicine and National Research Council (IOM). The aim of this study was to evaluate if a GWG outside the IOM recommendation in a Norwegian population is associated with increased risk of pregnancy complications like hypertension, low and high birth weight, preeclampsia, emergency caesarean delivery, and maternal post-partum weight retention (PPWR) at 6 and 18 months.
This study was performed in 56 101 pregnant women included in the prospective national Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) in the years 1999 to 2008. Women who delivered a singleton live born child during gestational week 37 to 42 were included. Maternal prepregnant and postpartum weight was collected from questionnaires at 17th week of gestation and 6 and 18 months postpartum.
A weight gain less than the IOM recommendations (GWG??IOM rec.) significantly increased the risk of pregnancy hypertension, a high birth weight baby, preeclampsia and emergency cesarean delivery in both nulliparous and parous normal weight women. Similar results were found for overweight women except for no increased risk for gestational hypertension in parous women with GWG?>?IOM rec. Seventy-four percent of the overweight nulliparous women and 66% of the obese women had a GWG?>?IOM rec. A GWG?>?IOM rec. resulted in increased risk of PPWR?>?2 kg in all weight classes, but most women attained their prepregnant weight class by 18 months post-partum.
For prepregnant normal weight and overweight women a GWG?>?IOM rec. increased the risk for unfavorable birth outcomes in both nulliparous and parous women. A GWG?>?IOM rec. increased the risk of a PPWR?>?2 kg at 18 months in all weight classes. This large study supports the Norwegian Health authorities' recommendations for normal weight and overweight women to comply with the IOM rec.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24917037 View in PubMed
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Bias from conditioning on live birth in pregnancy cohorts: an illustration based on neurodevelopment in children after prenatal exposure to organic pollutants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268382
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2015 Feb;44(1):345-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Zeyan Liew
Jørn Olsen
Xin Cui
Beate Ritz
Onyebuchi A Arah
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2015 Feb;44(1):345-54
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology
Bias (epidemiology)
Denmark
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Female
Fetal Death
Fluorocarbons - toxicity
Humans
Live Birth
Monte Carlo Method
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Abstract
Only 60-70% of fertilized eggs may result in a live birth, and very early fetal loss mainly goes unnoticed. Outcomes that can only be ascertained in live-born children will be missing for those who do not survive till birth. In this article, we illustrate a common bias structure (leading to 'live-birth bias') that arises from studying the effects of prenatal exposure to environmental factors on long-term health outcomes among live births only in pregnancy cohorts. To illustrate this we used prenatal exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in school-aged children as an example. PFAS are persistent organic pollutants that may impact human fecundity and be toxic for neurodevelopment. We simulated several hypothetical scenarios based on characteristics from the Danish National Birth Cohort and found that a weak inverse association may appear even if PFAS do not cause ADHD but have a considerable effect on fetal survival. The magnitude of the negative bias was generally small, and adjusting for common causes of the outcome and fetal loss can reduce the bias. Our example highlights the need to identify the determinants of pregnancy loss and the importance of quantifying bias arising from conditioning on live birth in observational studies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25604449 View in PubMed
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Births and ectopic pregnancies in a large cohort of women tested for Chlamydia trachomatis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163762
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 2007 Oct;34(10):739-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Inger Johanne Bakken
Finn Egil Skjeldestad
Stian Lydersen
Svein Arne Nordbø
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, SINTEF Health Research, Trondheim, Norway. inger.bakken@sintef.no
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 2007 Oct;34(10):739-43
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Chlamydia Infections - complications - epidemiology - microbiology
Chlamydia trachomatis - isolation & purification
Cohort Studies
Female
Fertility
Humans
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical
Live Birth
Mass Screening
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - microbiology
Pregnancy, Ectopic - epidemiology - microbiology
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Recent studies show divergent results concerning the risk of ectopic pregnancy following Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection.
Our goal was to investigate future reproductive health outcomes (births and ectopic pregnancies) among women tested for CT.
Our cohort consisted of 20,762 women born during 1970-1984 who were tested for CT during 1990-2003. We linked CT data to data on ectopic pregnancies and births during 1990-2004. Cox regression with time-dependent covariates was used to assess the association between CT history and births/ectopic pregnancies adjusted for age at first test. Analyses with ectopic pregnancy as outcome were also adjusted for parity.
We observed 9.6 births per 100 person-years of observation among women with negative tests only and 10.2 per 100 person-years among women with at least 1 positive test (hazard ratio adjusted for age at first test, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.01-1.12). Ectopic pregnancy incidence rates were higher for women with positive test(s) compared with women with negative test only (0.24 vs. 0.13 per 100 person-years; hazard ratio adjusted for age at first test and parity, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.27-2.60). Among women with at least 1 registered pregnancy, the adjusted hazard ratio was 2.03; 95% CI, 1.28-3.22).
Although women diagnosed with CT were at higher risk for ectopic pregnancy than women with negative test results only, our study suggest that their fertility prospects were better than they would have been had CT screening not been implemented in this population. Opportunistic CT screening is an appropriate method for maintaining female reproductive health.
PubMed ID
17479068 View in PubMed
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Birth weight differences between preterm stillbirths and live births: analysis of population-based studies from the U.S. and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119355
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2012;12:119
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Xun Zhang
K S Joseph
Sven Cnattingius
Michael S Kramer
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, McGill University Faculty of Medicine, Montreal, Canada.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2012;12:119
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Live Birth
Pregnancy
Premature Birth
Stillbirth
Sweden
United States
Abstract
Many stillbirths show evidence of fetal growth restriction, and most occur at preterm gestational age. The objective of this study is to compare birth weights at preterm gestational ages between live births and stillbirths, and between those occurring before or during labour.
Based on singleton births from the United States (U.S.) 2003-2005 (n=902,491) and Sweden 1992-2001 (n=946,343), we compared birth weights between singleton live births and stillbirths at 24-36 completed weeks of gestation from the U.S. and at 28-42 completed weeks from Sweden.
In both the U.S. and Sweden, stillbirth weight-for-gestational-age z-scores were at least one standard deviation lower than live birth z-scores at all preterm gestational ages (GA). In Sweden, no birth weight difference was observed between antepartum and intrapartum stillbirths at preterm GAs, whereas birth weights among intrapartum stillbirths were similar to those among live births at 37-42 weeks.
Birth weights observed at preterm gestation are abnormal, but preterm stillbirths appear to be more growth-restricted than preterm live birth. Similar birth weights among ante- and intrapartum preterm stillbirths suggest serious fetal compromise before the onset of labor.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23110432 View in PubMed
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Characteristics and associated anomalies in radial ray deficiencies in Finland--a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117224
Source
Am J Med Genet A. 2013 Feb;161A(2):261-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Niklas Pakkasjärvi
Eeva Koskimies
Annukka Ritvanen
Yrjänä Nietosvaara
Outi Mäkitie
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital, Helsinki University Central Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. niklas.pakkasjarvi@helsinki.fi
Source
Am J Med Genet A. 2013 Feb;161A(2):261-7
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Multiple - diagnosis - genetics - mortality
Anal Canal - abnormalities
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18
Esophagus - abnormalities
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Heart Defects, Congenital - diagnosis - genetics - mortality
Humans
Infant
Kidney - abnormalities
Limb Deformities, Congenital - diagnosis - genetics - mortality
Live Birth
Male
Prevalence
Spine - abnormalities
Stillbirth - genetics
Trachea - abnormalities
Trisomy - diagnosis
Abstract
Upper-limb defects with deficiencies of the radial ray have varying etiologies, with a low proportion of true Mendelian disorders. We carried out a population-based study to elucidate the birth prevalence and clinical spectrum of radial ray deficiencies in Finland. We identified all births with radial ray deficiency reported to the Finnish Register of Congenital Malformations in 1993-2005. Altogether 138 cases were identified (123 live births), with a birth prevalence of 1.83 per 10,000 births and a live birth prevalence of 1.64 per 10,000 live births. The proportion of infant deaths was as high as 35%. The majority of the cases were associated with known syndromes or multiple anomalies; only 13% were true isolated radial ray deficiencies. The most common syndrome was trisomy 18, and the most common in multiple anomalies was VACTERL association. In 8.7% of cases an association between radial ray deficiency and heart anomaly was observed. The high proportion of cases with associated major anomalies indicates that radial ray deficiency can be regarded isolated only after thorough assessment of the various organ systems in an affected infant.
PubMed ID
23322606 View in PubMed
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Congenital heart defect case ascertainment by the Alberta Congenital Anomalies Surveillance System.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125499
Source
Birth Defects Res A Clin Mol Teratol. 2012 Jun;94(6):449-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Tanya Bedard
R Brian Lowry
Barbara Sibbald
Joyce R Harder
Cynthia Trevenen
Vera Horobec
John D Dyck
Author Affiliation
Alberta Congenital Anomalies Surveillance System, Alberta Health and Wellness, Calgary, Canada. tanya.bedard@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
Birth Defects Res A Clin Mol Teratol. 2012 Jun;94(6):449-58
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta - epidemiology
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Heart Defects, Congenital - epidemiology
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Live Birth - epidemiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Statistical Distributions
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Abstract
Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common type of congenital anomaly, with a wide range of reported birth prevalence estimates. This quality assurance study describes CHD case ascertainment by the Alberta Congenital Anomalies Surveillance System (ACASS).
ACASS data for CHD cases were compared with additional sources including the two Pediatric Cardiology clinics in Alberta, the Alberta Children's Hospital Department of Pathology, and hospital records. Cases included live births, stillbirths, and fetal deaths at less than 20 weeks' gestation born in Alberta, Canada, between 1995 and 2002. The birth prevalence of cases and chi-square linear trend analyses were calculated for specific types of heart defects for the total study period.
The ascertainment of CHD cases by ACASS was 45%. The total prevalence of CHD cases was 5.59 per 1000 total births (TBs; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.32-5.86) when ACASS was the only data source and increased to 12.42 per 1000 TBs (95% CI, 12.03-12.83) when all data sources were used. Although the total prevalence of CHD cases remained stable during 1995 to 2002, the prevalence of atrial septal defect (ASD) and cases with an ASD and ventricular septal defect (VSD) significantly increased. The prevalence of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction cases significantly decreased during the study period.
Pediatric cardiology clinics are worth including as additional ascertainment sources to contribute to more accurate prevalence estimates. The significant increases of ASD and cases with both an ASD and VSD may reflect differences in diagnostic and ascertainment practices.
PubMed ID
22473636 View in PubMed
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Congenital Microphthalmia, Anophthalmia and Coloboma among Live Births in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283695
Source
Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2016 Oct;23(5):324-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Laura Roos
Hanne Jensen
Karen Grønskov
René Holst
Zeynep Tümer
Source
Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2016 Oct;23(5):324-30
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anophthalmos - epidemiology - genetics
Chromosome Aberrations - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Coloboma - epidemiology - genetics
DNA Copy Number Variations
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Live Birth - epidemiology
Logistic Models
Male
Microphthalmos - epidemiology - genetics
Prevalence
Abstract
This study aims to quantify the occurrence of the congenital eye malformations anophthalmia (AO), microphthalmia (MO) and coloboma among liveborn infants in Denmark, and to estimate the rate of chromosomal abnormalities in this group of patients.
A cohort of patients born in 1995-2012 with diagnoses of MO/AO or coloboma was identified from the Danish National Patient Registry (DNPR), and their ocular and extra-ocular diagnoses were reviewed. In order to assess the occurrence of chromosomal abnormalities in the cohort, the data were cross-referenced with the Danish Cytogenetic Central Registry (DCCR).
We identified 415 patients with MO/AO/coloboma in the DNPR. The total number of live births from 1995-2012 was 1,174,299, and the average birth prevalence of MO/AO/coloboma was 3.6/10,000 live births and of MO/AO was 1.2/10,000 live births. Extra-ocular abnormalities were observed in 32.1% of MO/AO cases and 21.7% of coloboma cases. Chromosome analysis was performed in 36.1% of the cohort, and 14.7% of cases had an abnormal karyotype. In 8.7% of the cohort, a chromosome microarray analysis was performed, and in 44.4% of cases, a possibly pathogenic copy number variation was observed.
The birth prevalence of MO/AO/coloboma in Denmark has been steady at 3.6/10,000 live births during the last 17 years. The rate of syndromic cases was lower compared to other studies. A relatively high rate of pathogenic chromosomal aberrations was observed, suggesting an important role for cytogenetic analysis in this group of patients.
PubMed ID
27552085 View in PubMed
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