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Are dysfunctional attitudes in depressive disorder trait or state dependent?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46328
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1998 Jun;97(6):419-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
T. Ohrt
L H Thorell
I. Sjödin
G. d'Elia
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1998 Jun;97(6):419-22
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Attitude
Case-Control Studies
Depression - physiopathology
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - physiopathology - psychology
Female
Humans
Lithium - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Personality
Remission Induction
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate whether euthymic patients in remission on lithium prophylaxis score higher on the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS) than healthy subjects, thus indicating a trait quality of dysfunctional attitudes in unipolar depression. A total of 79 patients with recurrent unipolar depressive episodes and 79 individually matched healthy controls were compared using a Swedish version of the DAS. The results indicate that DAS score is a state-dependent variable in depressive disorder.
PubMed ID
9669513 View in PubMed
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Changes in mood stabilizer prescription patterns in bipolar disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277408
Source
J Affect Disord. 2016 May;195:50-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Alina Karanti
Mathias Kardell
Ulrika Lundberg
Mikael Landén
Source
J Affect Disord. 2016 May;195:50-6
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anticonvulsants - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Benzodiazepines - therapeutic use
Bipolar Disorder - drug therapy
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Lithium - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Sweden
Valproic Acid - therapeutic use
Abstract
Lithium is a first line treatment option in bipolar disorder, but several alternative treatments have been introduced in recent years, such as antiepileptic and atypical antipsychotic drugs. Little is known about how this has changed the prescription patterns. We investigated possible changes in the use of mood stabilizers and antidepressants in Sweden during 2007-2013.
Data was collected from Swedish registers: the National Quality Assurance Register for bipolar disorder (BipoläR), the Prescribed Drug Register, and the Patient Register. Logistic regression models with drug use as outcomes were used to adjust for confounding factors such as sex, age, year of registration, and subtypes of bipolar disorder.
In both bipolar subtypes, lithium use decreased steadily during the study period, while the use of lamotrigine and quetiapine increased. The use of valproate decreased in bipolar II disorder and the use of olanzapine decreased among women. The use of antidepressant remained principally unchanged but increased somewhat in bipolar I disorder.
We only report data from 2007 as the coverage of BipoläR prior to 2007 was too low to allow for reliable analyses.
Significant changes in the prescription of drugs in the treatment of bipolar disorder have occurred in recent years in Sweden. Further studies are needed to clarify whether these changes alter the outcome in bipolar disorder.
PubMed ID
26859073 View in PubMed
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[Changes in prescription patterns to patients with bipolar syndromes. Increased use of lamotrigine and decreased use of lithium].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274728
Source
Lakartidningen. 2014 Dec 17-31;111(51-52):2284-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Alina Karanti
Mathias Kardell
Ulrika Lundberg
Mikael Landén
Source
Lakartidningen. 2014 Dec 17-31;111(51-52):2284-6
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Anticonvulsants - therapeutic use
Bipolar Disorder - drug therapy - epidemiology
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - trends
Female
Humans
Lithium - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Registries
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Triazines - therapeutic use
Abstract
Lithium is a first line option in the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder, but several alternative treatment regimens have been introduced in recent years, among them treatment with antiepileptic compounds and atypical antipsychotic drugs. Little is known about if and how this has changed the prescription patterns of mood stabilizers. We analysed trends in prescription of mood stabilisers in Sweden using the national quality register for bipolar disorder (BipoläR), the Prescribed Drug Register, and the Patient Register during the years 2007-2011. We found that lithium use decreased while lamotrigine use increased in bipolar patients. These changes could not be ex-plained by differences in bipolar subtypes; lithium use decreased in both bipolar type I and type II, and the use of lamotrigine increased in bipolar type II. Lithium use was more common in men, whereas lamotrigine use was more common in women. The prescription of other mood stabilisers did not change during these years. 
PubMed ID
25514669 View in PubMed
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Completed suicide and recent lithium treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222970
Source
J Affect Disord. 1992 Oct;26(2):101-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
E. Isometsä
M. Henriksson
J. Lönnqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Affect Disord. 1992 Oct;26(2):101-3
Date
Oct-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland
Humans
Lithium - therapeutic use
Male
Mood Disorders - classification - diagnosis - drug therapy
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Suicide
Treatment Refusal
Abstract
Of 1397 completed suicides in Finland in one year, all victims (N = 20) that had used lithium in prophylaxis and treatment of a mood disorder during the three final months were carefully examined. Eight victims (40%) fulfilled the criteria of recent adequate lithium prophylaxis. Continuous or intermittent noncompliance with psychopharmacological treatment during the last two years was reported in the majority (85%) of the victims. Only two cases used lithium as a suicide method. The study suggests that problems especially in compliance but also in quality of treatment are likely to limit the usefulness of lithium treatment in suicide prevention.
PubMed ID
1447426 View in PubMed
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Effect of an educational program for general practitioners on Gotland on the pattern of prescription of psychotropic drugs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46663
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1990 Dec;82(6):399-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1990
Author
W. Rutz
L. von Knorring
J. Wålinder
B. Wistedt
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, St. Olof's Hospital, Visby, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1990 Dec;82(6):399-403
Date
Dec-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Curriculum
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - drug therapy
Drug Utilization - trends
Education, Medical, Continuing
Family Practice - education
Humans
Lithium - therapeutic use
Prescriptions, Drug
Psychiatry - education
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
During the years 1983-1984, an educational program was given to all general practitioners on the island of Gotland. This report evaluates changes in prescription habits from 1982 to 1985. To correct for general trends that occurred simultaneously, the prescription habits were compared to the habits in the rest of Sweden. Both on Gotland and in Sweden as a whole, the use of antidepressants increased from 1982-1985, but significantly more on Gotland. In 1982, the use of antidepressants was low on Gotland, 54% of that in the rest of Sweden. After the educational programs, Gotland reached 77% of the use in the rest of Sweden. In 1982, the use of lithium was 123% of that in the rest of Sweden. After the educational programs, the use of lithium was unchanged, and a small increase of 5.6% was seen in the rest of Sweden. After the educational programs, the prescription of sedatives on Gotland decreased (-8.2%), and an increase of 4.5% was seen in the rest of Sweden. The use of major tranquilizers also decreased significantly (-23%) on Gotland. Even in the rest of Sweden, a significant but much smaller decrease was seen: -13%. On Gotland the frequency of hypnotics remained stable from 1982-1985, and a significant increase was seen in the rest of Sweden.
PubMed ID
2291408 View in PubMed
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Effect of enterosorbent noolith on behavior and serotonin (1A) receptors in mouse brain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46079
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2001 May;131(5):496-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2001
Author
Y I Borodin
D F Avgustinovich
M V Tenditnik
L N Rachkovskaya
A V Shurlygina
V A Trufakin
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Immunomorphology, Institute of Clinical and Experimental Lymphology, Siberian Division of the Russian Academy of Medical Science.
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2001 May;131(5):496-8
Date
May-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Behavior, Animal - drug effects
Brain - drug effects
Cerebral Cortex - drug effects
Depression - drug therapy
Hypothalamus - drug effects
Lithium - therapeutic use
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Physical Conditioning, Animal
Receptors, Serotonin - drug effects
Receptors, Serotonin, 5-HT1
Abstract
Protective properties of a new enterosorbent noolith (lithium ions immobilized on mineral matrix) were studied in C57Bl/6J mice predisposed to depression caused by intermale confrontations. The drug was administered daily for 15 days after the 5th confrontation and then the animals were tested in the forced swimming test. The number of specific(3)H-8-OH-DPAT binding sites in 3 brain regions was determined. It is shown that noolith produced an antidepressive effect manifested in decreased immobility time in the Porsolt test. Moreover, noolith reduced the number of 1A-serotonin receptors in the frontal cortex and hypothalamus. It is concluded that noolith possesses protective properties.
PubMed ID
11550065 View in PubMed
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[Effect of the enteric sorbent noolit on the psychoemotional status in mice]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46080
Source
Eksp Klin Farmakol. 2001 Jan-Feb;64(1):26-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu I Borodin
L N Rachkovskaia
M V Tenditnik
A V Shurlygina
N N Kudriavtseva
V A Trufakin
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical and Experimental Lymphology, Siberian Division, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, ul. Timakova, 2, Novosibirsk, 630117 Russia.
Source
Eksp Klin Farmakol. 2001 Jan-Feb;64(1):26-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Behavior, Animal - drug effects
Depression - etiology - psychology - therapy
English Abstract
Enterosorption - methods
Lithium - therapeutic use
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Minerals
Silicon - therapeutic use
Stress, Psychological - complications
Abstract
The enterosorbent noolit (representing a mineral matrix base with immobilized lithium and silicon compounds) significantly affects the psychoemotional state of mice with depression model induced by prolonged social emotional stress. Noolit administration produces a pronounced anxiolytic and antidepressant effect and reduced the level of behavioral deficiency in the test animals.
PubMed ID
11544798 View in PubMed
Less detail

Estimates of the prevalence of bipolar affective disorder. Methods based on treatment with lithium.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244968
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1981 Jan;63(1):83-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1981
Author
R. Eastwood
S. Stiasny
S. Tice
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1981 Jan;63(1):83-90
Date
Jan-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bipolar Disorder - classification - drug therapy - epidemiology
Canada
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Lithium - therapeutic use
Male
Abstract
During this century the epidemiology of the affective disorders has been studied, several classifications have been described and effective treatment measures have been introduced. Difficulties have been encountered in the epidemiology area due to inconsistent use of the terminology of measurement and varying types of classification; although it is possible to arrive at a broad consensus of agreement if the data are examined restrictedly. The clinical need for accurate rates of illness has become greater since the inception of the prophylactic drug lithium carbonate. While not used specifically for bipolar affective disorder, it is only for this disorder that its use has been demonstrated beyond doubt. The occurrence of mania in this disorder enables this aspect of the condition to be used as a marker. This paper describes three measures of the period prevalence of bipolar affective disorder, based upon treatment with lithium, two of which are of the "unobtrusive' type. Agreement was found between the three approaches and the utility of these for general use is discussed.
PubMed ID
7234468 View in PubMed
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High rate of antidepressant treatment in elderly people who commit suicide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210595
Source
BMJ. 1996 Nov 2;313(7065):1118
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2-1996
Author
M. Waern
J. Beskow
B. Runeson
I. Skoog
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Sahlgrenska Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
BMJ. 1996 Nov 2;313(7065):1118
Date
Nov-2-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects
Depression - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Lithium - therapeutic use
Male
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Suicide
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1991 Jul 4;325(1):1-52046708
Cites: Int Psychogeriatr. 1995 Summer;7(2):149-648829424
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 1995 Apr;166(4):451-77795915
PubMed ID
8916699 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.