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Control options for Listeria monocytogenes in seafoods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196105
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2000 Dec 20;62(3):267-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-20-2000
Author
H H Huss
L V Jørgensen
B F Vogel
Author Affiliation
Danish Institute for Fisheries Research, Department of Seafood Research, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby. fish@ffl.min.dk
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2000 Dec 20;62(3):267-74
Date
Dec-20-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Fish Products - microbiology - standards
Food Contamination - prevention & control
Food Preservation
Food-Processing Industry - standards
Hot Temperature
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - growth & development
Listeriosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prevalence
Quality Control
Seafood - microbiology
Time Factors
Abstract
At least three outbreaks of listeriosis associated with seafood have been reported. Listeria monocytogenes is widely distributed in the general environment including fresh water, coastal water and live fish from these areas. Contamination or recontamination of seafood may also take place during processing and low levels (
PubMed ID
11156271 View in PubMed
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Institutional and relational determinants in high- and medium-extent food product crises: the inner perspective of a public health crisis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142051
Source
Int J Environ Health Res. 2010 Aug;20(4):299-312
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Sylvain Charlebois
Hilary Horan
Author Affiliation
University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. sylvain.charlebois@uregina.ca
Source
Int J Environ Health Res. 2010 Aug;20(4):299-312
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Product Safety
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Food Contamination
Food Industry - standards
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Hygiene
Listeria - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Models, organizational
Product Recalls and Withdrawals
Product Surveillance, Postmarketing
Public Health
Safety Management
Abstract
In 2008, Canada enacted its biggest-ever food recall in response to a Listeria crisis, stemming from a Maple Leaf Foods plant, that killed 22 Canadians. Afterwards, Maple Leaf's market share quickly returned to pre-crisis levels, but the long-term repercussions of the scare still reverberate in Maple Leaf's brand. In this case study, which offers an organizational perspective on the food recall, data was collected, through in-depth interviews of persons involved in the crisis response, and analyzed. The aim of this paper is to make transparent the ways in which Maple Leaf Foods organized their resources to manage the 2008 food recall. Results reveal that institutional and relational determinants are the most important factors in high- and medium-extent food product crises, whereas external and internal effects primarily influence an organization's capacity to cope with severe crises. Based on these findings, a conceptual framework is presented and managerial implications are discussed.
PubMed ID
20645203 View in PubMed
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Learning from Listeria: the autonomy of the Public Health Agency of Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155140
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Oct 21;179(9):877-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-21-2008

Listeria monocytogenes: a continuing challenge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194105
Source
Nutr Rev. 2001 Jun;59(6):183-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
C W Donnelly
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, The University of Vermont, Burlington, 05405, USA.
Source
Nutr Rev. 2001 Jun;59(6):183-94
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Colony Count, Microbial
Disease Outbreaks
Food Contamination
Food Handling - standards
Food Microbiology
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Incidence
Listeria monocytogenes - pathogenicity
Listeriosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Meat - microbiology - standards
Quality Control
Safety
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
As a leading cause of death from a foodborne pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes continues to cause sporadic cases and outbreaks of illness. The most recent of these outbreaks in the United States involved consumption of hot dogs, with 101 cases of illness and 21 deaths reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for the years 1998-1999. Epidemiologic analysis determined that contamination levels in hot dogs were remarkably low (0.3 CFU [colony-forming units] L monocytogenes serotype 4b/g). That same year, manufacturers of hot dogs and luncheon meats collectively recalled more than 500,000 pounds of product owing to possible Listeria contamination. This article, through focus on issues such as reexamination of zero-tolerance policies, improvements in detection and enumeration procedures, the impact of epidemiologic innovations, and measures needed to further reduce the incidence of listeriosis will highlight why L monocytogenes remains a continuing challenge for the food industry.
PubMed ID
11444596 View in PubMed
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Present situation in Canada regarding Listeria monocytogenes and ready-to-eat seafood products.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196106
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2000 Dec 20;62(3):247-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-20-2000
Author
J M Farber
Author Affiliation
Health Canada, Food Directorate, Sir F.G. Banting Research Centre, Ottawa, Ontario. jeff_farber@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2000 Dec 20;62(3):247-51
Date
Dec-20-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Fish Products - microbiology
Food Contamination - legislation & jurisprudence
Food Microbiology
Humans
Incidence
Listeria monocytogenes - growth & development
Listeriosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Public Policy
Seafood - microbiology
Abstract
The present situation regarding Listeria monocytogenes and ready-to-eat (RTE) seafood is discussed. An updated regulatory policy on L. monocytogenes directs inspection and compliance action to those RTE foods capable of supporting growth of the organism and is based on a combination of inspection, environmental sampling and product testing. The incidence of L. monocytogenes in imported seafood products in 1996-1997 and 1997-1998 was 0.88 and 0.3%, respectively. With respect to domestic products, an analysis of 347 RTE foods in 1997-1998 and 1998-1999, at one of the large fish inspection labs in the Maritimes, revealed an absence of L. monocytogenes. The only seafood product linked to suspect cases of listeriosis in Canada was imported.
PubMed ID
11156268 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.